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When we look back, the only things we cherish are those which in some way met our original want; the desire which formed in... Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, September 20, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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When we look back, the only things we cherish are those which in some way met our original want; the desire which formed in us in early youth, undirected, and of its own accord.

Willa Cather (1873-1947)
KSPavan
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Quotation of the Day

When we look back, the only things we cherish are those which in some way met our original want; the desire which formed in us in early youth, undirected, and of its own accord.

Willa Cather (1873-1947)
monamagda
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Context from:
THE SONG OF THE LARK


VI.

KRONBORG


He fell to looking back over his life and asking himself which years of it he would like to live over again,—just as they had been,—and they were not many. His college years he would live again, gladly. After them there was nothing he would care to repeat until he came to Thea Kronborg. There had been something stirring about those years in Moonstone, when he was a restless young man on the verge of breaking into larger enterprises, and when she was a restless child on the verge of growing up into something unknown. He realized now that she had counted for a great deal more to him than he knew at the time. It was a continuous sort of relationship. He was always on the lookout for her as he went about the town, always vaguely expecting her as he sat in his office at night. He had never asked himself then if it was strange that he should find a child of twelve the most interesting and companionable person in Moonstone. It had seemed a pleasant, natural kind of solicitude. He explained it then by the fact that he had no children of his own. But now, as he looked back at those years, the other interests were faded and inanimate. The thought of them was heavy. But wherever his life had touched Thea Kronborg's, there was still a little warmth left, a little sparkle. Their friendship seemed to run over those discontented years like a leafy pattern, still bright and fresh when the other patterns had faded into the dull background. Their walks and drives and confidences, the night they watched the rabbit in the moonlight,—why were these things stirring to remember? Whenever he thought of them, they were distinctly different from the other memories of his life; always seemed humorous, gay, with a little thrill of anticipation and mystery about them. They came nearer to being tender secrets than any others he possessed. Nearer than anything else they corresponded to what he had hoped to find in the world, and had not found. It came over him now that the unexpected favors of fortune, no matter how dazzling, do not mean very much to us. They may excite or divert us for a time, but when we look back, the only things we cherish are those which in some way met our original want; the desire which formed in us in early youth, undirected, and of its own accord.

Read more: http://cather.unl.edu/0007.html#pt6

raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Wednesday, September 20, 2017 9:52:00 AM

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Cather, Willa Sibert
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Cather, Willa Sibert (sī`bərt kăth`ər), 1873–1947, American novelist and short-story writer, b. Winchester, Va., considered one of the great American writers of the 20th cent. When she was nine her family moved to the Nebraska prairie frontier. She graduated from the Univ. of Nebraska in 1895 and worked as a journalist and as a teacher in Pittsburgh. In 1904 she went to New York City. The publication of The Troll Garden (1905), her first collection of short stories, led to her appointment to the editorial staff of McClure's Magazine. She eventually became managing editor and saved the magazine from financial disaster. After the publication of Alexander's Bridge in 1912, she left McClure's and devoted herself to creative writing. For many years she lived quietly in New York City's Greenwich Village. The first of her novels to deal with her major theme is O Pioneers! (1913), a celebration of the strength and courage of the frontier settlers. Other novels with this theme are My Ántonia (1918), One of Ours (1922; Pulitzer Prize), and A Lost Lady (1923). The Song of the Lark (1915) focuses on another of Cather's major preoccupations—the need of artists to free themselves from inhibiting influences, particularly that of a rural or small-town background; the tales collected in Youth and the Bright Medusa (1920) and the novel Lucy Gayheart (1935) also treat this theme. With success and increasing age Cather became convinced that the beliefs and way of life she valued were disappearing. This disillusionment is poignantly evident in her novel The Professor's House (1925). She subsequently turned to North America's far past for her material: to colonial New Mexico in Death Comes for the Archbishop (1927), widely regarded as her masterpiece, and to 17th-century Quebec for Shadows on the Rock (1931), in both novels blending history with religious reverence and loving characterizations. The volumes My Mortal Enemy (1926) and The Old Beauty and Others (1948) present her highly skilled shorter fiction. Her intense interest in the craft of fiction is shown in the essays in Not Under Forty (1936) and On Writing (1949). Cather herself was a master of that craft, her novels and stories written in a pellucid style of great charm and stateliness.
Bibliography
See selected letters ed. by A. Jewell and J. Stout (2013); E. K. Brown and L. Edel, Willa Cather: A Critical Biography (1980); S. O'Brien, Willa Cather: the Emerging Voice (1987); J. Woodres, Willa Cather: A Literary Life (1989).
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.
Cather, Willa Sibert
Born Dec. 7, 1876, in Winchester, Va.; died Apr. 24, 1947, in New York. American writer.
Cather, in the novels O Pioneers! (1913) and My Antonia (1918), depicted the rigorous life of immigrant farmers in Nebraska, expressing admiration for their integrity. Her critical attitude toward the “prosperity” of the 20th century was expressed both in novels devoted to contemporary times (The Professor’s House, 1925) and in the historical novel Death Comes for the Archbishop (1927).
WORKS
The Novels and Stories, vols. 1–13. Boston, 1937–41.
The World and the Parish, vols. 1–2. Lincoln, Neb., 1970.
In Russian translation:
“Pokhorony skul’ptora.” In Amerikanskaia novella XX v. Moscow, 1958.
REFERENCES
Elistratova, A. A. “Uilla Kezer. (Sotsial’naia satira i fermerskaia utopiia.) In the collection Problemy literatury SShA XX v. Moscow, 1970.
Willa Cather and Her Critics. Ithaca, N.Y. [1967]. (Bibliography.)
Woodress, J. Willa Cather: Her Life and Art. New York, 1970. (Bibliography, pp. 270–282.)
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights

with my pleasure
Bully_rus
Posted: Wednesday, September 20, 2017 3:07:14 PM
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Daemon wrote:
When we look back, the only things we cherish are those which in some way met our original want; the desire which formed in us in early youth, undirected, and of its own accord.

Willa Cather (1873-1947)

We look back when all major events behind us...
Verbatim
Posted: Wednesday, September 20, 2017 10:05:20 PM
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Joined: 10/3/2012
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Daemon wrote:
When we look back, the only things we cherish are those which in some way met our original want; the desire which formed in us in early youth, undirected, and of its own accord.

Willa Cather (1873-1947)


Wanting not in our original want...
We were then as happy as a lark,
Blithely trusting our runaway bark,
Sails aflutter, to find its own course,
Hardly ever steered, yet none the worse.


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