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The Kaaba Options
Daemon
Posted: Saturday, September 09, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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The Kaaba

Islam's holiest place, the Kaaba—whose name is derived from the Arabic word for "cube"—is a cuboid stone building located in the Great Mosque in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. When performing their daily prayers, Muslims around the world turn to face the Kaaba, whose four corners correspond roughly to the points of the compass. Although the Kaaba is surrounded by a restricted area that can only be entered by Muslims, the structure itself predates Islam. What did the Kaaba represent to pre-Islamic Meccans? More...
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Saturday, September 09, 2017 9:57:36 AM

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Kaaba
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Kaaba (Ka'aba)
ٱلْكَعْبَة
Mosquée Masjid el Haram à la Mecque.jpg
The Kaaba in Al-Masjid al-Haram
Basic information
Location Mecca, Hejaz, Saudi Arabia
Geographic coordinates 21°25′21.0″N 39°49′34.2″E / 21.422500°N 39.826167°E
Affiliation Islam
Country Saudi Arabia
Height (max) 13.1 m (43 ft)

The Kaaba (Arabic: ٱلْكَعْبَة‎‎ al-kaʿbah IPA: [alˈkaʕba], "The Cube"), also referred as al-ka`bah al-musharrafah (The Holy Kaaba), is a building at the center of Islam's most sacred mosque, that is Al-Masjid Al-Ḥarām (Arabic: الـمَـسـجِـد الـحَـرَام‎‎, The Sacred Mosque), in Mecca, Hejaz, Saudi Arabia.[1] It is the most sacred site in Islam.[2] It is considered by Muslims to be the bayt Allāh, the "House of God", and has a similar role to the Tabernacle and Holy of Holies in Judaism. Wherever they are in the world, Muslims are expected to face the Kaaba when performing salat (prayer). From any point in the world, the direction facing the Kaaba is called the qibla.

One of the Five Pillars of Islam requires every Muslim who is able to do so to perform the hajj pilgrimage at least once in their lifetime. Multiple parts of the hajj require pilgrims to make tawaf, the circumambulation seven times around the Kaaba in a counter-clockwise direction. Tawaf is also performed by pilgrims during the umrah (lesser pilgrimage).[2] However, the most significant times are during the hajj, when millions of pilgrims gather to circle the building within a 5-day period.[3][4] In 2013, the number of pilgrims coming from outside the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to perform hajj was officially reported as 1,379,531.[5] In 2014, Saudi Arabia reported having completed Hajj permits for 1,389,053 international pilgrims and 63,375 for residents.[6]
The Kaaba.

Lexicology

The literal meaning of the Arabic word ka`bah (كَعْبَة) is “cube.”[7] The Kaaba of Mecca is called by many names in the Quran and Hadith, such as al-bayt (the house), al-bayt al-ḥarām (the sacred house), bayt Allāh (the house of God), al-bayt al-`atīq (the ancient house), and ’awwal bayt (the first house).
Architecture and interior

The Kaaba is a cubical stone structure made of granite. It is approximately 13.1 m (43 ft) high (some claim 12.03 m (39.5 ft)), with sides measuring 11.03 m (36.2 ft) by 12.86 m (42.2 ft).[8][9] Inside the Kaaba, the floor is made of marble and limestone. The interior walls, measuring 13 m (43 ft) by 9 m (30 ft), are clad with tiled, white marble halfway to the roof, with darker trimmings along the floor. The floor of the interior stands about 2.2 m (7.2 ft) above the ground area where tawaf is performed.

The wall directly adjacent to the entrance of the Kaaba has six tablets inlaid with inscriptions, and there are several more tablets along the other walls. Along the top corners of the walls runs a green cloth embroidered with gold Qur'anic verses. Caretakers anoint the marble cladding with the same scented oil used to anoint the Black Stone outside. Three pillars (some erroneously report two) stand inside the Kaaba, with a small altar or table set between one and the other two. (It has been claimed that this table is used for the placement of perfumes or other items.) Lamp-like objects (possible lanterns or crucible censers) hang from the ceiling. The ceiling itself is of a darker colour, similar in hue to the lower trimming. A golden door—the bāb al-tawbah (also romanized as Baabut Taubah, and meaning "Door of Repentance")—on the right wall (right of the entrance) opens to an enclosed staircase that leads to a hatch, which itself opens to the roof. Both the roof and ceiling (collectively dual-layered) are made of stainless steel-capped teak wood.
A drawing of the Kaaba. See key in text.
A technical drawing of the Kaaba showing dimensions and elements
Pilgrims performing Tawaf

Each numbered item in the following list corresponds to features noted in the diagram image.

Al-Ḥajaru al-Aswad, "the Black Stone", is located on the Kaaba's eastern corner. Its northern corner is known as the Ruknu l-ˤĪrāqī, "the Iraqi corner", its western as the Ruknu sh-Shāmī, "the Levantine corner", and its southern as Ruknu l-Yamanī, "the Yemeni corner".[2][9] The four corners of the Kaaba roughly point toward the four cardinal directions of the compass.[2] Its major (long) axis is aligned with the rising of the star Canopus toward which its southern wall is directed, while its minor axis (its east-west facades) roughly align with the sunrise of summer solstice and the sunset of winter solstice.[10][11]
The entrance is a door set 2.13 m (7 ft) above the ground on the north-eastern wall of the Kaaba, which acts as the façade.[2] In 1979 the 300 kg gold doors made by chief artist Ahmad bin Ibrahim Badr, replaced the old silver doors made by his father, Ibrahim Badr in 1942.[12] There is a wooden staircase on wheels, usually stored in the mosque between the arch-shaped gate of Banū Shaybah and the Zamzam Well.

with my pleasure
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Saturday, September 09, 2017 2:30:22 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/27/2014
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Location: Tbilisi, T'bilisi, Georgia
Some suppose, there is a meteoritic stone inside this shrine.
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