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Diane de Poitiers (1499) Options
Daemon
Posted: Sunday, September 03, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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Diane de Poitiers (1499)

As a lady-in-waiting at the French royal court, Diane captivated the man who would become King Henry II of France—though he was 20 years her junior. After the death of her husband, she became Henry's mistress. Following his coronation in 1547, Diane held court as queen in all but name, while the real queen lived in relative obscurity. However, after Henry's 1559 death, she was forced to retire from court. Her death may have been the result of drinking too much gold in an elixir meant to do what? More...
KSPavan
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Diane de Poitiers (1499)
As a lady-in-waiting at the French royal court, Diane captivated the man who would become King Henry II of France—though he was 20 years her junior. After the death of her husband, she became Henry's mistress. Following his coronation in 1547, Diane held court as queen in all but name, while the real queen lived in relative obscurity. However, after Henry's 1559 death, she was forced to retire from court.
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Diane de Poitiers
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Related to Diane de Poitiers: Catherine de Medici
Diane de Poitiers
Diane de Poitiers
DianedePoitiers.jpg
Born 3 September 1499
Château de Saint-Vallier, Saint-Vallier, Drôme
Died 25 April 1566 (aged 66)
Anet, Eure-et-Loir
Title The Grand Senechal(e) of Normandy
Countess of Saint-Vallier
Duchess of Étampes
Duchess of Valentinois
Spouse(s) Louis de Brézé, Seigneur d'Anet
Children Françoise de Brézé
Louise de Brézé
Parents Jean de Poitiers, Seigneur de Saint Vallier
Jeanne de Batarnay

Diane de Poitiers (3 September 1499 – 25 April 1566) was a French noblewoman and a prominent courtier at the courts of kings Francis I and his son, Henry II of France. She became notorious as the latter's favourite. It was in this capacity that she wielded much influence and power at the French Court, which continued until Henry was mortally wounded in a tournament accident,[1] during which his lance wore her favour (ribbon) rather than his wife's.

The subject of paintings by François Clouet as well other anonymous painters, Diane was also immortalised in a statue by Jean Goujon.
Early life and marriage

She was born the daughter of Jean de Poitiers, Seigneur de Saint Vallier and Jeanne de Batarnay in the Château de Saint-Vallier, in the town of Saint-Vallier, Drôme, in the Rhône-Alpes region of France.[1] When still a girl, she was briefly in the retinue of Anne de Beaujeu, eldest sister of King Charles VIII, a capable and highly intelligent woman who held the regency of France during his minority.[2]

Diane was educated according to the principles of Renaissance humanism which was popular at the time, music, hunting, manners, languages, the art of conversation, and dancing. She learned how to read Latin and Greek, and became a keen hunter and sportswoman, remaining in good physical condition well into middle age.

At the age of 15, she married Louis de Brézé, seigneur d'Anet, who was 39 years her senior. He was a grandson of King Charles VII who served as a courtier of King Francis I. She bore him two daughters, Françoise de Brézé (1518–1574) and Louise de Brézé (1521–1577).[3]

In 1524, her father was accused of treason as an accomplice of the rebellious Connétable de Bourbon. His head was already on the execution block when his life was spared by Francis I.

When Louis de Brézé died in 1531 in Anet, Diane adopted the habit of wearing the colours of black and white, her personal trademark for the rest of her life. These were among the permitted colours of mourning, which as a widow she was required to wear, but they were also the symbolic colours of the bright and dark sides of the moon. They played on her name, Diane, which derived from Diana, the name of the beautiful Roman goddess of the moon.

Her keen interest in financial matters and legal shrewdness now became apparent for the first time. She retained her late husband's emoluments as governor and grand-sénéchal of Normandy, assuming herself the title of "sénéchale de Normandie". She challenged in court the obligation to return Louis de Bézé's appanages to the royal domain. The king allowed her to enjoy the appanage's income "until the status of those lands has been totally clarified."

When still the wife of Louis de Brézé, she became lady-in-waiting to Queen Claude of France. After the queen died, she served in the same capacity to Louise of Savoy, then Eleanor of Austria.[4]

with my pleasure
monamagda
Posted: Sunday, September 03, 2017 2:49:22 PM

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French king's mistress poisoned by gold elixir
The mistress of France's 16th century King Henry II was poisoned by a gold elixir she drank to keep herself looking young, scientists have discovered.



Diane de Poitiers was renowned for her youthful looks and porcelain skin and thought the concoction preserved her youth.
Experts say she was up to 20 years older than the king but her appearance made them look the same age. One courtier said she was "as fresh and lovable" in her final years as when aged 30 and had skin "of great whiteness".
She was unusually athletic for the time, keeping in shape by horse riding, hunting and going on daily swims in the river next to the chateau d'Anet, in northern France where she lived.
But her secret was the elixir she drunk every day made up of gold chloride and diethyl ether.
It was one of a host of anti-ageing treatments peddled by apothecaries, along with recipes including spider webs, earthworms, frogspawn and scorpion's oil.
However, French experts writing in the British Medical Journal say the yellow liquid said to harness the powers of the sun and keep her immutable actually slowly killed her at the age of 66.
Three scientists unearthed her bones last year and found the jaw perfectly matched her portrait while her leg bone had a clean break from a documented riding accident.
The breakthrough came when they studied locks of her hair kept at the chateau d'Anet: these were found to contain gold 500 times above normal levels, as well as mercury – used as a "purifier" in the elixir.
Since she was not a queen and did not wear a crown, scientists ruled out the possibility that jewellery had contaminated her hair and body.
Scientists Joel Poupon and Philippe Charlier, who usually works in hospital morgues in Paris, worked together to identify de Poitiers in the recently opened Normandy grave.
"Her hair was much finer than normal, which is a secondary effect of chronic gold poisoning," said Mr Charlier.
"It gives you white skin (from anaemia) and very fragile hair, bones and teeth. She was in this fragile state when she died."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/france/6865939/French-kings-mistress-poisoned-by-gold-elixir.html




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