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Lockheed SR-71 Flies from New York to London in Under Two Hours (1974) Options
Daemon
Posted: Friday, September 01, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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Lockheed SR-71 Flies from New York to London in Under Two Hours (1974)

Shrouded in secrecy, the SR-71 Blackbird was a US reconnaissance plane used from the 1960s through the 90s. Difficult to detect by radar and virtually untouchable by anti-aircraft missiles, it flew at three times the speed of sound and at altitudes of up to 85,000 feet (26,000 m). Its existence was publicly acknowledged in 1964. A decade later, an SR-71 flew from New York to London in just under 1 hour and 55 minutes, crushing the previous record. What life support measures kept the crew alive? More...
catiii
Posted: Friday, September 01, 2017 1:34:56 AM
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I was in the control tower at Beale AFB when the SR-71 made this historic speed run, & I have to tell you that - in all seriousness - it was NOT going as fast as it was capable of going!

Ken
KSPavan
Posted: Friday, September 01, 2017 2:37:09 AM

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This Day in History
Lockheed SR-71 Flies from New York to London in Under Two Hours (1974)
Shrouded in secrecy, the SR-71 Blackbird was a US reconnaissance plane used from the 1960s through the 90s. Difficult to detect by radar and virtually untouchable by anti-aircraft missiles, it flew at three times the speed of sound and at altitudes of up to 85,000 feet (26,000 m). Its existence was publicly acknowledged in 1964. A decade later, an SR-71 flew from New York to London in just under 1 hour and 55 minutes, crushing the previous record.
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Friday, September 01, 2017 9:40:40 AM

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Location: Baghdad, Mayorality of Baghdad, Iraq
SR-71 Blackbird
SR-71 Blackbird
SR-71 "Blackbird"
Dryden's SR-71B Blackbird, NASA 831, slices across the snow-covered southern Sierra Nevada Mountains of California after being refueled by an Air Force tanker during a 1994 flight. SR-71B was the trainer version of the SR-71. The dual cockpit to allow the instructor to fly. Note the streaks of fuel from refueling spillage.
An SR-71B trainer over the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California in 1994. The raised second cockpit is for the instructor.
Role Strategic reconnaissance aircraft
Manufacturer Lockheed, Skunk Works division
Designer Clarence "Kelly" Johnson
First flight 22 December 1964
Introduction 1966
Retired 1998
Status Retired
Primary users United States Air Force
NASA
Number built 32
Developed from Lockheed A-12

The Lockheed SR-71 "Blackbird" was an advanced, long-range, Mach 3+ strategic reconnaissance aircraft.[1] It was developed as a black project from the Lockheed A-12 reconnaissance aircraft in the 1960s by Lockheed and its Skunk Works division. Clarence "Kelly" Johnson was responsible for many of the design's innovative concepts. During reconnaissance missions, the SR-71 operated at high speeds and altitudes to allow it to outrace threats. If a surface-to-air missile launch was detected, the standard evasive action was simply to accelerate and outfly the missile.[2]

The SR-71 served with the U.S. Air Force from 1964 to 1998. A total of 32 aircraft were built; 12 were lost in accidents, but none lost to enemy action.[3][4] The SR-71 has been given several nicknames, including Blackbird and Habu.[5] Since 1976, it has held the world record for the fastest air-breathing manned aircraft, a record previously held by the YF-12.[6][7][8]
Development
Background

Lockheed's previous reconnaissance aircraft was the relatively slow U-2, designed for the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). The 1960 downing of Francis Gary Powers's U-2 underscored the aircraft's vulnerability and the need for faster reconnaissance aircraft. The CIA turned again to Kelly Johnson and Lockheed's Skunk Works, who developed the A-12[9] and would go on to build upon its design concepts for the SR-71.

The A-12 first flew at Groom Lake (Area 51), Nevada, on 25 April 1962. Thirteen were built; two variants were also developed, including three YF-12A interceptor prototypes, and two M-21 drone carrier variants. The aircraft was meant to be powered by the Pratt & Whitney J58 engine, but development ran over schedule, and it was equipped instead with the less powerful Pratt & Whitney J75. The J58s were retrofitted as they became available, and became the standard powerplant for all subsequent aircraft in the series (A-12, YF-12, M-21) as well as the SR-71. The A-12 flew missions over Vietnam and North Korea before its retirement in 1968. The program's cancellation was announced on 28 December 1966,[10] due both to budget concerns[11] and because of the forthcoming SR-71.
SR-71
Blackbird on the assembly line at Lockheed Skunk Works
A-12 production on what would later become the Blackbird assembly line at Skunk Works

The SR-71 designator is a continuation of the pre-1962 bomber series, which ended with the XB-70 Valkyrie. During the later period of its testing, the B-70 was proposed for a reconnaissance/strike role, with an RS-70 designation. When it was clear that the A-12 performance potential was much greater, the Air Force ordered a variant of the A-12 in December 1962.[12] Originally named R-12[N 1] by Lockheed, the Air Force version was longer and heavier than the A-12, with a longer fuselage to hold more fuel, two seats in the cockpit, and reshaped chines. Reconnaissance equipment included signals intelligence sensors, a side-looking radar and a photo camera.[12] The CIA's A-12 was a better photo reconnaissance platform than the Air Force's R-12, since the A-12 flew somewhat higher and faster,[11] and with only one pilot it had room to carry a superior camera[11] and more instruments.[13]

During the 1964 campaign, Republican presidential nominee Barry Goldwater repeatedly criticized President Lyndon B. Johnson and his administration for falling behind the Soviet Union in developing new weapons. Johnson decided to counter this criticism by revealing the existence of the YF-12A Air Force interceptor, which also served as cover for the still-secret A-12,[14] and the Air Force reconnaissance model since July 1964. Air Force Chief of Staff General Curtis LeMay preferred the SR (Strategic Reconnaissance) designation and wanted the RS-71 to be named SR-71. Before the July speech, LeMay lobbied to modify Johnson's speech to read SR-71 instead of RS-71. The media transcript given to the press at the time still had the earlier RS-71 designation in places, creating the story that the president had misread the aircraft's designation.[15][N 2]

In 1968, Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara canceled the F-12 interceptor program; the specialized tooling used to manufacture both the YF-12 and the SR-71 was also ordered destroyed.[16] Production of the SR-71 totaled 32 aircraft with 29 SR-71As, 2 SR-71Bs, and the single SR-71C.[17]

with my pleasure
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Friday, September 01, 2017 2:48:48 PM

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Location: Tbilisi, T'bilisi, Georgia
This aircraft looks futuristic even for today.
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