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Thurgood Marshall Confirmed as First African-American US Supreme Court Justice (1967) Options
Daemon
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Thurgood Marshall Confirmed as First African-American US Supreme Court Justice (1967)

The great-grandson of a slave and the first African American to serve on the US Supreme Court, Marshall was appointed by President Lyndon B. Johnson at the height of the Civil Rights movement. As a lawyer, he won 29 of the 32 cases he argued before the Supreme Court, including the landmark Brown v. Board of Education and others that established equal protection for African Americans in housing, voting, employment, and education. What church has included Marshall in its calendar of saints? More...
KSPavan
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Thurgood Marshall Confirmed as First African-American US Supreme Court Justice (1967)
The great-grandson of a slave and the first African American to serve on the US Supreme Court, Marshall was appointed by President Lyndon B. Johnson at the height of the Civil Rights movement. As a lawyer, he won 29 of the 32 cases he argued before the Supreme Court, including the landmark Brown v. Board of Education and others that established equal protection for African Americans in housing, voting, employment, and education.
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Wednesday, August 30, 2017 9:35:59 AM

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Thurgood Marshall
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Thurgood Marshall
Thurgood Marshall
Thurgood-marshall-2.jpg
Marshall in 1976
Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court
In office
October 2, 1967[1] – October 1, 1991
Nominated by Lyndon B. Johnson
Preceded by Tom C. Clark
Succeeded by Clarence Thomas
32nd United States Solicitor General
In office
August 1965 – August 1967
President Lyndon B. Johnson
Preceded by Archibald Cox
Succeeded by Erwin N. Griswold
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit
In office
August 1961 – August 1965
Nominated by John F. Kennedy
Preceded by New Seat
Succeeded by Wilfred Feinberg
Personal details
Born July 2, 1908
Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.
Died January 24, 1993 (aged 84)
Bethesda, Maryland, U.S.
Spouse(s) Vivien "Buster" Burey (1929–1955) (her death)
Cecilia Suyat (1955–1993) (his death)
Children Thurgood Marshall, Jr.
Alma mater Lincoln University
Howard University School of Law
Religion Episcopalian

Thurgood Marshall (July 2, 1908 – January 24, 1993) was an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court, serving from October 1967 until October 1991. Marshall was the Court's 96th justice and its first African-American justice.

Before becoming a judge, Marshall was a lawyer who was best known for his high success rate in arguing before the Supreme Court and for the victory in Brown v. Board of Education, a decision that desegregated public schools. He served on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit after being appointed by President John F. Kennedy and then served as the Solicitor General after being appointed by President Lyndon Johnson in 1965. President Johnson nominated him to the United States Supreme Court in 1967.
Early life
Henry Highland Garnet School (P.S. 103), where Marshall attended elementary school

Marshall was born in Baltimore, Maryland, on July 2, 1908. He was the great-grandson of a slave who was born in the modern-day Democratic Republic of the Congo;[2][3] his grandfather was also a slave.[4] His original name was Thoroughgood, but he shortened it to Thurgood in second grade because he disliked spelling it. His father, William Marshall, who was a railroad porter, and his mother Norma, a teacher, instilled in him an appreciation for the Constitution of the United States and the rule of law.[5]
Education

Marshall attended Frederick Douglass High School in Baltimore and was placed in the class with the best students. He graduated a year early in 1925 with a B-grade average, and placed in the top third of the class. Subsequently he went to Lincoln University. It is commonly reported that he intended to study medicine and become a dentist. But according to his application to Lincoln University,[6] Marshall stated that his goal was to become a lawyer. Other alumni at Lincoln University at the same time as Marshall were poet Langston Hughes, musician Cab Calloway and future president of Ghana Kwame Nkrumah. Initially he did not take his studies seriously, and was suspended twice for hazing and pranks against fellow students.[7][8] He was not politically active at first, becoming a "star" of the debating team[8] and in his freshman year opposed the integration of African-American professors at the university.[7] Hughes later described him as "rough and ready, loud and wrong".[9] In his second year he got involved in a sit-in protest against segregation at a local movie theatre. In this same year, he was initiated as a member of the first black fraternity, Alpha Phi Alpha.[10] His marriage to Vivien Burey in September 1929 encouraged him to take his studies seriously, and he graduated from Lincoln with honors (cum laude) Bachelor of Arts in Humanities, with a major in American literature and philosophy.[8]

Marshall wanted to study in his hometown law school, the University of Maryland School of Law, but did not apply because of the school's segregation policy. Marshall instead attended Howard University School of Law, where he worked harder than he had at Lincoln and his views on discrimination were heavily influenced by the dean Charles Hamilton Houston.[8] In 1933 he graduated from there first in his class. Three years later, Marshall would successfully represent his client bringing suit against the University of Maryland Law School for its policy, ending segregation there (see Murray v. Pearson).

with my pleasure
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Wednesday, August 30, 2017 1:18:32 PM

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The man does not look like one having Black African ancestry.
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