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Et in Arcadia Ego: I Am Also in Arcadia Options
Daemon
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Et in Arcadia Ego: I Am Also in Arcadia

"Et in Arcadia Ego" is a Latin phrase that most famously appears as the title of two highly influential 17th-century paintings depicting shepherds from classical antiquity gathered around an austere tomb. The phrase is usually interpreted as "I am also in Arcadia," and its purpose is to set up an ironic contrast between mortality and idle merriment. Recently, however, the phrase has been used in conspiracy theories and interpreted to mean what? More...
KSPavan
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Et in Arcadia Ego: I Am Also in Arcadia
"Et in Arcadia Ego" is a Latin phrase that most famously appears as the title of two highly influential 17th-century paintings depicting shepherds from classical antiquity gathered around an austere tomb. The phrase is usually interpreted as "I am also in Arcadia," and its purpose is to set up an ironic contrast between mortality and idle merriment.
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Monday, August 28, 2017 9:30:53 AM

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Et in Arcadia ego
Also found in: Acronyms.
Et in Arcadia ego
Et in Arcadia ego French: Les Bergers d'Arcadie
Artist Nicolas Poussin
Year 1637–1638
Type oil on canvas
Dimensions 87 cm × 120 cm (34.25 in × 47.24 in)
Location Musée du Louvre

"Et in Arcadia ego" is a Latin phrase that most famously appears as the title of two paintings by Nicolas Poussin (1594–1665). They are pastoral paintings depicting idealized shepherds from classical antiquity, clustering around an austere tomb. The more famous second version of the subject, measuring 87 by 120 centimetres (34.25 x 47.24 in), is in the Louvre, Paris, and also goes under the name "Les bergers d'Arcadie" ("The Arcadian Shepherds").
Origin

The translation of the phrase is "Even in Arcadia, there am I". The usual interpretation is that "I" refers to death, and "Arcadia" means a utopian land. It would thus be a memento mori. During Antiquity, Greeks lived in cities close to the sea, and led an urban life. Only Arcadians, in the middle of the Peloponnese, lacked cities, were far from the sea, and led a shepherd life. Thus for urban Greeks, especially during the Hellenistic era, Arcadia symbolized pure, rural, idyllic life, far from the city.

However, Poussin's biographer, André Félibien, interpreted the phrase to mean that "the person buried in this tomb lived in Arcadia"; in other words, that the person too once enjoyed the pleasures of life on earth. This reading was common in the 18th and 19th centuries. For example William Hazlitt wrote that Poussin "describes some shepherds wandering out in a morning of the spring, and coming to a tomb with this inscription, 'I also was an Arcadian'."[1]

The former interpretation ("ego" referring to death) is now generally considered more likely; the ambiguity of the phrase is the subject of a famous essay by the art historian Erwin Panofsky (see References). Either way, the sentiment was meant to set up an ironic contrast between the shadow of death and the usual idle merriment that the nymphs and swains of ancient Arcadia were thought to embody.
Guercino's version of the subject.

The first appearance of a tomb with a memorial inscription (to Daphnis) amid the idyllic settings of Arcadia appears in Virgil's Eclogues V 42 ff. Virgil took the idealized Sicilian rustics that had first appeared in the Idylls of Theocritus and set them in the primitive Greek district of Arcadia (see Eclogues VII and X). The idea was taken up anew in the circle of Lorenzo de' Medici in the 1460s and 1470s, during the Florentine Renaissance.

In his pastoral work Arcadia (1504), Jacopo Sannazaro fixed the Early Modern perception of Arcadia as a lost world of idyllic bliss, remembered in regretful dirges. The first pictorial representation of the familiar memento mori theme that was popularized in 16th-century Venice, now made more concrete and vivid by the inscription ET IN ARCADIA EGO, is Guercino's version, painted between 1618 and 1622 (in the Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Antica, Rome), in which the inscription gains force from the prominent presence of a skull in the foreground, beneath which the words are carved.
Poussin's 1627 version of the Arcadian Shepherds, in Chatsworth House, depicting a different tomb with the same inscription.

Poussin's own first version of the painting (now in Chatsworth House) was probably commissioned as a reworking of Guercino's version. It is in a far more Baroque style than the later version, characteristic of Poussin's early work. In the Chatsworth painting the shepherds are actively discovering the half-hidden and overgrown tomb, and are reading the inscription with curious expressions. The shepherdess, standing at the left, is posed in sexually suggestive fashion, very different from her austere counterpart in the later version. The later version has a far more geometric composition and the figures are much more contemplative. The mask-like face of the shepherdess conforms to the conventions of the Classical "Greek profile".

with my pleasure
monamagda
Posted: Monday, August 28, 2017 2:49:23 PM

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Secret Meaning to the Phrases of Et in Arcadia Ego and I Tego Arcana Dei Revealed


As more and more occasions of the expression were discovered, the reasoning for its usage continued to be questioned. It seemed to always be associated with the mysterious.

This article offers not another possible explanation on what, where, when or how the phrase was used but a possible reason for why it was used.

It has been noted the fourteen letters of Et in Arcadia Ego is an anagram of I Tego Arcana Dei; translated as Begone! I conceal the secrets of God. An anagram is the re-arrangement of letters. To be a true anagram, all letters must be used and none are added. The same set of letters simply changes into another array. During the time this enigmatic collection of letters first appeared (Guercino’s painting), anagrams were highly popular and were used to convey deeper understandings, as explained in a previous article entitled; The History and Secrets of the Anagram. The unfamiliar phrase of Et in Arcadia Ego beckoned to be changed and most likely was. This leads one to believe the anagram is vital for discovering the intentional value and reason for its usage.

Another clue is considered also. Et in Arcadia Ego does not include a definite verb and so may imply an action is required for disclosing its significance.

Read more:
http://mysteriouswritings.com/secret-meaning-to-the-phrases-of-et-in-arcadia-ego-and-i-tego-arcana-dei-revealed/

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