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First Issue of Scientific American Magazine Is Published (1845) Options
Daemon
Posted: Monday, August 28, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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First Issue of Scientific American Magazine Is Published (1845)

In 1845, Rufus Porter—an eccentric inventor, painter, and editor—published the first issue of Scientific American, a weekly newspaper about new inventions. By 1853, its circulation had reached 30,000 and it was reporting on various sciences, such as astronomy and medicine. In 1921, it became a monthly. Its solidly-researched, well-written articles, accompanied by illustrations and explanations, have made it a highly regarded publication. How much did the first subscriptions cost? More...
KSPavan
Posted: Monday, August 28, 2017 1:10:17 AM

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First Issue of Scientific American Magazine Is Published (1845)
In 1845, Rufus Porter—an eccentric inventor, painter, and editor—published the first issue of Scientific American, a weekly newspaper about new inventions. By 1853, its circulation had reached 30,000 and it was reporting on various sciences, such as astronomy and medicine. In 1921, it became a monthly. Its solidly-researched, well-written articles, accompanied by illustrations and explanations, have made it a highly regarded publication.
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Monday, August 28, 2017 9:32:03 AM

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Scientific American
Also found in: Acronyms.
Scientific American
Scientific American A magazine cover depicting a photorealistic view of the Earth, inserted into a melted ice cube, with the magazines masthead at top and a headline between the masthead and the Earth reading "Did Humans Stop an ICE AGE?" Beneath the headline in smaller type is the subheading "8,000 years of global warming"
Cover of the March 2005 issue
Categories Popular science
Frequency Monthly
Total circulation
(2012) 476,867[1]
First issue August 28, 1845
Company Nature Publishing Group
Country United States
Language English
Website scientificamerican.com
ISSN 0036-8733

Scientific American (informally abbreviated, SciAm) is a popular science magazine. It is notable for its long history of presenting scientific information on a monthly basis to the general educated public, through its careful attention to the clarity of its text as well as the quality of its specially commissioned color graphics.[citation needed] Many famous scientists, including Albert Einstein, have contributed articles in the past 168 years. It is the oldest continuously published monthly magazine in the United States.
History

Ajay Scientific American was founded by inventor and publisher Rufus M. Porter [2] in 1845 as a four page weekly newspaper. Throughout its early years, much emphasis was placed on reports of what was going on at the U.S. Patent Office. It also reported on a broad range of inventions including perpetual motion machines, an 1860 device for buoying vessels by Abraham Lincoln, and the universal joint which now finds place in nearly every automobile manufactured. Current issues include a "this date in history" section, featuring excerpts from articles originally published 50, 100, and 150 years earlier; topics include humorous incidents, wrong-headed theories, and noteworthy advances in the history of science and technology.

Porter sold the newspaper to Alfred Ely Beach and Orson Desaix Munn I a mere ten months after founding it. Until 1948, it remained owned by Munn & Company.[2] Under Orson Desaix Munn III, grandson of Orson I, it had evolved into something of a "workbench" publication, similar to the twentieth century incarnation of Popular Science.

In the years after World War II, the magazine was in steep decline. In 1948, three partners who were planning on starting a new popular science magazine, to be called The Sciences, purchased the assets of the old Scientific American instead and put its name on the designs they had created for their new magazine. Thus the partners—publisher Gerard Piel, editor Dennis Flanagan, and general manager Donald H. Miller, Jr.—essentially, created a new magazine.[3] Miller retired in 1979, Flanagan and Piel in 1984, when Gerard Piel's son Jonathan became president and editor; circulation had grown fifteen-fold since 1948. In 1986, it was sold to the Holtzbrinck group of Germany, which has owned it since.

In the fall of 2008, Scientific American was put under the control of Nature Publishing Group, a division of Holtzbrinck.[4]

Donald Miller died in December, 1998,[5] Gerard Piel in September 2004 and Dennis Flanagan in January 2005. Mariette DiChristina is the current editor-in-chief, after John Rennie stepped down in June 2009.[4]
International editions

Scientific American published its first foreign edition in 1890, the Spanish-language La America Cientifica. Publication was suspended in 1905, and another 63 years would pass before another foreign-language edition appeared: In 1968, an Italian edition, Le Scienze, was launched, and a Japanese edition, Nikkei Science (日経サイエンス), followed three years later. A new Spanish edition, Investigación y Ciencia was launched in Spain in 1976, followed by a French edition, Pour la Science, in France in 1977, and a German edition, Spektrum der Wissenschaft, in Germany in 1978. A Russian edition V Mire Nauki was launched in the Soviet Union in 1983, and continues in the present-day Russian Federation. Kexue (科学, "Science" in Chinese), a simplified Chinese edition launched in 1979, was the first Western magazine published in the People's Republic of China. Founded in Chongqing, the simplified Chinese magazine was transferred to Beijing in 2001. Later in 2005, a newer edition, Global Science (环球科学), was published instead of Kexue, which shut down due to financial problems. A traditional Chinese edition, known as 科學人 ("Scientist" in Chinese), was introduced to Taiwan in 2002, and has been developed to the best popular science magazine in Taiwan. The Hungarian edition Tudomány existed between 1984 and 1992. In 1986, an Arabic-edition, Oloom magazine (مجلة العلوم), was published. In 2002, a Portuguese edition in was launched in Brazil.

Today, Scientific American publishes 18 foreign-language editions around the globe: Arabic, Brazilian Portuguese, Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese, Czech, Dutch, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Lithuanian (discontinued after 15 issues), Polish, Romanian, Russian, and Spanish.

From 1902 to 1911, Scientific American supervised the publication of the Encyclopedia Americana, which during some of that period was known as The Americana.

with my pleasure
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Monday, August 28, 2017 12:57:37 PM

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Love this magazine.
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