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Ivan the Terrible (1530) Options
Daemon
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Ivan the Terrible (1530)

Ivan IV was the first ruler of Russia to formally assume the title "czar." His early reign saw modernization, expansion, and reform. However, after a near-fatal illness, a failed war against Sweden and Poland, and the death of a wife, Ivan's mental state deteriorated. He withdrew to his personal territory, and his later reign was marked by extreme violence, repression, and tyranny. He rid himself of unwanted wives by forcing them into convents. Why did Ivan murder his son—and only heir—in 1581? More...
ChristopherJohnson
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Sadistic tyrant. Stalin admired him. One must read the History of the Russian State by Nikolay Karamzin to get the full idea of how mean and repulsive this monarch was.
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Ivan the Terrible (1530)
Ivan IV was the first ruler of Russia to formally assume the title "czar." His early reign saw modernization, expansion, and reform. However, after a near-fatal illness, a failed war against Sweden and Poland, and the death of a wife, Ivan's mental state deteriorated. He withdrew to his personal territory, and his later reign was marked by extreme violence, repression, and tyranny. He rid himself of unwanted wives by forcing them into convents.
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Ivan IV of Russia
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Related to Ivan IV of Russia: Ivan VI of Russia
Ivan IV of Russia
Ivan the Terrible
Иван Грозный
Ivan-Groznyi-Parsuna.jpg
Ivan the Terrible (State Historical Museum)
Tsar of All the Russias
Reign 16 January 1547 – 28 March [O.S. 18 March] 1584
Coronation 16 January 1547
Predecessor Himself as Grand Prince
Successor Feodor I
Grand Prince of Moscow
Reign 3 December 1533 – 16 January 1547
Predecessor Vasili III
Successor Himself as Tsar
Spouse Anastasia Romanovna
Maria Temryukovna
Marfa Sobakina
Anna Koltovskaya
Anna Vasilchikova
Vasilisa Melentyeva
Maria Dolgorukaya
Maria Nagaya
more...
Issue
Dmitry Ivanovich (born 1552)
Ivan Ivanovich
Feodor Ivanovich
Dmitry Ivanovich (born 1582)
Full name
Ivan Vasilyevich
Dynasty Rurik
Father Vasili III
Mother Elena Glinskaya
Born 25 August 1530
Kolomenskoye, Russia
Died 28 March [O.S. 18 March] 1584 (aged 53)
Moscow, Russia
Burial Cathedral of the Archangel, Moscow
Religion Russian Orthodox

Ivan IV Vasilyevich (Russian: Ива́н Васи́льевич; 25 August 1530 – 28 March [O.S. 18 March] 1584),[1] known in English as Ivan the Terrible (Russian: , Ivan Grozny; lit. Fearsome), was the Grand Prince of Moscow from 1533 to 1547 and Tsar of All the Russias from 1547 until his death. His long reign saw the conquest of the Khanates of Kazan, Astrakhan, and Siberia, transforming Russia into a multiethnic and multiconfessional state spanning almost one billion acres, approximately 4,046,856 km2 (1,562,500 sq mi).[2] Ivan managed countless changes in the progression from a medieval state to an empire and emerging regional power, and became the first ruler to be crowned as Tsar of All the Russias.

Historic sources present disparate accounts of Ivan's complex personality: he was described as intelligent and devout, yet given to rages and prone to episodic outbreaks of mental illness. On one such outburst he killed his groomed and chosen heir Ivan Ivanovich. This left the Tsardom to be passed to Ivan's younger son, the weak and intellectually disabled[3] Feodor Ivanovich. Ivan's legacy is complex: he was an able diplomat, a patron of arts and trade, founder of Russia's first Print Yard, but he is also remembered for his apparent paranoia and arguably harsh treatment of the nobility.
Sobriquet

The English word terrible is usually used to translate the Russian word grozny in Ivan's nickname, but the modern English usage of terrible, with a pejorative connotation of bad or evil, does not precisely represent the intended meaning. The meaning of grozny is closer to the original usage of terrible—inspiring fear or terror, dangerous (as in Old English in one's danger), formidable or threatening. Other translations were suggested, such as Ivan the Fearsome or Ivan the Formidable.[4][5][6]
Early life

Ivan was the son of Vasili III and his second wife, Elena Glinskaya. When Ivan was three years old, his father died from a boil and inflammation on his leg which developed into blood poisoning. Ivan was proclaimed the Grand Prince of Moscow at his father's request. At first, his mother Elena Glinskaya acted as regent, but she died of what many believe to be assassination by poison[7][8] when Ivan was only eight years old. According to his own letters, Ivan, along with his younger brother Yuri, often felt neglected and offended by the mighty boyars from the Shuisky and Belsky families.

Ivan was crowned with Monomakh's Cap at the Cathedral of the Dormition at age 16 on 16 January 1547. He was the first person to be crowned as "Tsar of All the Russias", hence claiming the ancestry of Kievan Rus. Prior to that, rulers of Muscovy were crowned as Grand Princes, although Ivan III the Great, his grandfather, styled himself "tsar" in his correspondence.

By being crowned Tsar, Ivan was sending a message to the world and to Russia: he was now the one and only supreme ruler of the country, and his will was not to be questioned. "The new title symbolized an assumption of powers equivalent and parallel to those held by former Byzantine Emperor and the Tatar Khan, both known in Russian sources as Tsar. The political effect was to elevate Ivan's position."[9] The new title not only secured the throne, but it also granted Ivan a new dimension of power, one intimately tied to religion. He was now a "divine" leader appointed to enact God's will, "church texts described Old Testament kings as 'Tsars' and Christ as the Heavenly Tsar."[10] The newly appointed title was then passed on from generation to generation, "succeeding Muscovite rulers...benefited from the divine nature of the power of the Russian monarch...crystallized during Ivan's reign."[11]
Domestic policy

with my pleasure
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