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The greens Options
ahmetwrt
Posted: Tuesday, August 2, 2011 8:04:19 PM
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"Don't take the red apples. Take the greens."

In the sentence above, is it completely acceptable to say "the greens" instead of "the green apples/ones"?
What I'd like to know is; can names of colours be used like the one above?
Could we say, for example; "The blues are better than the yellows"?
What do you think?
kazi
Posted: Tuesday, August 2, 2011 8:25:25 PM
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Yes, that's correct.
IMcRout
Posted: Tuesday, August 2, 2011 9:05:23 PM
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ahmet wrote, "Don't take the red apples. Take the greens."

Take the green ones.

If you refer to your local football (or whatever) team, you can call them the Reds or Blues or whatever colour their shirts are. And in the 1950s there were 'Reds under the beds', meaning communist spies were thought to be everywhere.

But in most other cases - at least in non-colloquial language - you should use 'the green/blue/yellow/etc. ones when the apples/cars/bikes/etc. have been mentioned immediately before.

But I'd better leave the ultimate judging to our native speakers.
pontello
Posted: Tuesday, August 2, 2011 11:23:23 PM
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I think that IMcRout explanation is perfect.
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, August 3, 2011 1:24:01 AM
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It is also just possible that the speaker could be employing a play on words: 'The Greens' is the name of a political party dedicated to a clean environment. It is the only context in which I have heard the expression "the greens" used. Bochy - above - is perfectly correct in his explanation.
munro66
Posted: Wednesday, August 3, 2011 9:32:16 AM
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From personal experience when buying of apples it is the name of the apple that is chosen and it could be either red or green in colour.

'Greens' means vegetables -i.e cabbages, brussel sprouts.

The new Football season in the UK is nearly here and the friendly games between clubs have been played, if those clubs meet one another again during the new season it will be played in a competitive spirit, with everything to play for. Football Club terraces will be decked out with fans wearing their team colours and one would never say "the [colour] are better than the [colour] for this could up like being red rag to a bull to a very dedicated fan of a particular football club who might take other actions of a more serious nature than just uttering a mouthful of foul language.
MTC
Posted: Wednesday, August 3, 2011 9:54:41 AM
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IMcRourt commented: "If you refer to your local football (or whatever) team, you can call them the Reds or Blues or whatever colour their shirts are. And in the 1950s there were 'Reds under the beds', meaning communist spies were thought to be everywhere."

That's a good example of metonymy which TFD defines as follows:

me·ton·y·my (m-tn-m)
n. pl. me·ton·y·mies
A figure of speech in which one word or phrase is substituted for another with which it is closely associated, as in the use of Washington for the United States government or of the sword for military power.

In color metonymy, colors are substituted for things with which they are closely associated like Reds for Communists, Greens for Environmentalists, etc.

Your question has little to do with color metonymy, but does give me an opportunity to spout off.

ahmetwrt
Posted: Wednesday, August 3, 2011 6:59:11 PM
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MTC wrote:
IMcRourt commented: "If you refer to your local football (or whatever) team, you can call them the Reds or Blues or whatever colour their shirts are. And in the 1950s there were 'Reds under the beds', meaning communist spies were thought to be everywhere."

That's a good example of metonymy which TFD defines as follows:

me·ton·y·my (m-tn-m)
n. pl. me·ton·y·mies
A figure of speech in which one word or phrase is substituted for another with which it is closely associated, as in the use of Washington for the United States government or of the sword for military power.

In color metonymy, colors are substituted for things with which they are closely associated like Reds for Communists, Greens for Environmentalists, etc.

Your question has little to do with color metonymy, but does give me an opportunity to spout off.



Thanks for all comments.
Then, if one would like to use this metonymy, does he say "The white are ..." or "The whites are ..." instead of "The white people are ..."?
Romany
Posted: Friday, August 5, 2011 12:43:25 AM
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Ahmetwrt -

In your example the correct wording would be the whites."

However, that is not a particularly good example, as referring to people by the colour of their skin would leave one wide open to charges of racism.
Carruthers
Posted: Friday, August 5, 2011 5:03:09 AM
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IMcRout is correct, I think
pedro
Posted: Friday, August 5, 2011 5:24:10 AM
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The greens beats the blues
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