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Daemon
Posted: Friday, November 26, 2021 12:00:00 AM
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sere

(adjective) Dried up or withered.

Synonyms: shriveled

Usage: The desert was edged with sere vegetation.
lazarius
Posted: Friday, November 26, 2021 12:16:32 AM

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Daemon wrote:


Quote:
Marilla whisked into the kitchen, grievously disturbed, leaving a very much distracted little soul in the porch behind her. Presently Anne stepped out bareheaded into the chill autumn dusk; very determinedly and steadily she took her way down through the sere clover field over the log bridge and up through the spruce grove, lighted by a pale little moon hanging low over the western woods. Mrs. Barry, coming to the door in answer to a timid knock, found a white-lipped eager-eyed suppliant on the doorstep.

-
Anne of Green Gables, Lucy Maud Montgomery

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Mehrdad77
Posted: Friday, November 26, 2021 1:10:21 AM

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sere (adj.)
Old English sear "dried up, withered, barren," from Proto-Germanic *sauzas (source also of Middle Low German sor, Dutch zoor "dry"), from PIE root *saus- "dry" (source also of Sanskrit susyati "dries, withers;" Old Persian uška- "dry" (adj.), "land" (n.); Avestan huška- "dry;" Greek auos "dry," auein "to dry;" Latin sudus "dry"). A good word now relegated to bad poetry. Related to sear. Sere month was an old name for "August."

Mehrdad77
Posted: Friday, November 26, 2021 1:11:20 AM

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You can describe something that is dried up, withered, or without moisture with the adjective sere. The desert climate, for example, is sere, as is your skin after a day in the wind.

Mehrdad77
Posted: Friday, November 26, 2021 1:15:43 AM

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Sere’s shriveled and withered meaning crops up in things like Shakespeare's Macbeth ("My way of life Is fall’n into the sere, the yellow leaf;" 5:III), or in archaic references to Sere-month (August), but it isn't frequently used in modern conversation. The variant spelling of sere is sear, which has other meanings that see more modern use.

Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Friday, November 26, 2021 6:45:36 AM

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"I have lived long enough. My way of life is to fall into the sere, the yellow leaf, and that which should accompany old age, as honor, love, obedience, troops of friends I must not look to have."


William Shakespeare
monamagda
Posted: Friday, November 26, 2021 3:02:16 PM

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Mehrdad77
Posted: Saturday, November 27, 2021 1:42:22 AM

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Orphic (adj.)
"of or related to Orpheus or the doctrines attributed to him," 1670s, from Latinized form of Greek orphikos "pertaining to Orpheus," the legendary master musician of ancient Thrace, son of Eagrus and Calliope, husband of Eurydice, who had the power of charming all living things and inanimate objects with his lyre. His name is of unknown origin. In later times he was accounted a philosopher and adept in secret knowledge, and various mystic doctrines were associated with his name, whence Orphic mysteries, etc. (late 17c.). The earlier adjective was Orphean (1590s). Related: Orphism.

Mehrdad77
Posted: Saturday, November 27, 2021 1:43:40 AM

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Today’s orphic tools may not aspire to the Greek prophet’s standard of beauty, but they carry this original impulse to combat the sounds of others.



The New Yorker May 31, 2019
Mehrdad77
Posted: Saturday, November 27, 2021 1:44:17 AM

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At a time of partisan “echo chambers” and the “silencing” of meaningful debate, there’s a metaphorical dimension to this orphic impulse to hear only what we want to hear.



The New YorkerMay 31, 2019
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