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Distressed/distraught, thin moustache Options
Penz
Posted: Monday, November 22, 2021 5:11:00 AM

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What's the difference between distressed and distraught, when I look it up a forum comes where someone explains that
Quote:
Distressed is like a stream that is passing in front of you. Distraught is like a picture of that stream.

What do you think?


Quote:
What is a thin moustache?

Is it normal in shape but less dense like someone would get a few days after shaving or a small line of moustache like Brad Pitt had in Inglorious Basterds?


Source: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
Chapter : 21
Quote:
The Hippogriff gave one sweep of its mighty wings and they were soaring upwards again, high as the top of the West Tower. Buckbeak landed with a clatter on the battlements and Harry and Hermione slid off him at once.

The creature couldn't have landed on the wall so I take the meaning of "battlements" here as the roof covered by battlements.

1) Even then, is "battlements" always plural even if we talk about the roof and not the structure surrounding it?

2) Now there is battlements on the Great Wall of China, but it doesn't look like like a roof but a path. So can we use "battlements" to refer to that area like we do in roofs?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, November 22, 2021 8:11:54 PM

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"Distressed" and "Distraught" are very similar.
That "explanation" makes absolutely no sense to me.

"Disraught" is a word based on an old meaning of "distracted" ("pulled away") - meaning "mentally unable to interact with the present environment". It's now really only used in that meaning as a technical (Psychology) term.
A person who is distraught is so "tied up" in their grief or worry that they do not see or hear what's going on around them.
The phrase "to distraction" is sometimes still used as an exaggeration - "The kids have been wild today - they drove me to distraction!"

"Distressed" (in the mental sense) means "upset" or "worried".

To me, "distraught" sounds rather stronger than "distressed" - though I can imagine them being used interchangeably in many cases.

**************
A thin moustache (to me) is a thin line - it could be fairly short like the Brad Pitt one, or l-o-n-g.


Sometimes called a 'pencil moustache' because they can look like they are drawn on the face.

****************
You're right. A gryphon could land on top of the narrow, notched wall (like a bird) but a hippogryph couldn't.

What I understand is that behind the crenelations (the top bit with alternating walls and gaps) is a flat path (the actual top of the wall) where archers could walk (and a hippogryph could land).



So, a flat path between the top of the wall and the sloping roof

*****************
It's often said as "battlements" - I guess because normally there is one battlement on top of each wall, and several walls to a castle.
Audiendus
Posted: Monday, November 22, 2021 9:23:43 PM
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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
"Distressed" and "Distraught" are very similar.
That "explanation" makes absolutely no sense to me.

It doesn't make sense to me either, but here is where it comes from (see the third post):

http://forum.wordreference.com/threads/distressed-or-distraught.328183/
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, November 22, 2021 10:58:29 PM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Audiendus wrote:
It doesn't make sense to me either, but here is where it comes from (see the third post)
Whoa! - Perhaps I need to study more English . . . None of those 2006 answers make much sense to me. The 2012 answer #6 seems clearer.

PS - I added more answer before I saw this.
Penz
Posted: Wednesday, November 24, 2021 1:44:37 AM

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So even for 1 roof surrounded by battlements, we could refer to the surface of the roof as "battlements" and not "battlement" as there is only one roof?


And what would we call the moustache that is normal in size but not dense as in a few days after shaving?
Penz
Posted: Thursday, November 25, 2021 3:46:19 AM

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Quote:
**************
You're right. A gryphon could land on top of the narrow, notched wall (like a bird) but a hippogryph couldn't.

What I understand is that behind the crenelations (the top bit with alternating walls and gaps) is a flat path (the actual top of the wall) where archers could walk (and a hippogryph could land).

So, a flat path between the top of the wall and the sloping roof

*****************
It's often said as "battlements" - I guess because normally there is one battlement on top of each wall, and several walls to a castle.


Dictionaries also mentions we can call the roof covered by battlements "battlements".

So even for one roof surrounded by battlements, we could refer to the surface of the roof as "battlements" and not "battlement" as there is only one roof?





And what would we call the moustache that is normal in size but not dense as in a few days after shaving?
thar
Posted: Thursday, November 25, 2021 3:57:58 AM

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Stop thinking of them as roofs. The battlements are the level where the defenders can shoot at attackers. They have no roof.
The have a surface where you can climb up to, and fight. That may form the roof of a space below, but the important thing is the place on top where you stand to defend the castle.
On a house, they might have a roof next to them, but they are the walls, not the roof.
The space on top would be called the battlements because it is flat - a roof is at an angle.







Penz
Posted: Thursday, November 25, 2021 10:35:13 AM

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1) But in the image, the flat space on top of one of the towers (that is, the edges of towers have battlments) would be called "battlements" not "battlement" despite having one floor surrounded by battlements?

2) And what would we call the moustache that is normal in size but not dense as in a few days after shaving?


I think I haven't been able to make myself about what I am asking.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Thursday, November 25, 2021 1:21:18 PM

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Yes that would be regarded as part of the battlements.
Penz
Posted: Thursday, November 25, 2021 1:38:41 PM

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Please read the whole question.
My question is the top flat area is singular if we consider only that of only one tower. Would we call that "battlements" not "battlement" as it is singular that is one floor surrounded by battlements? Please check the 2nd defintion in oxford dictionary. It could help.

And what would we call the moustache that is normal in size but not dense as in a few days after shaving?
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Thursday, November 25, 2021 2:11:28 PM

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This definition?

Quote:
1.1 A section of roof enclosed by battlements.
‘I want to go up on the battlements’


As the dictionary also says.

Quote:
NOUN

usually battlements


Battlements are normally referred to in the plural form.

The moustache, possibly stubble.
Quote:
2Short, stiff hairs growing on a part of the body that has not been shaved for a while, especially on a man’s face.
‘she ran her fingers over the dark stubble on his cheeks’
georgew
Posted: Thursday, November 25, 2021 9:19:27 PM

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https://www.google.com/search?q=distressed+distraught&oq=distressed+distraught&aqs=chrome..69i57j69i60j0l4.18308j1j7&client=ubuntu&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

See below.

Penz
Posted: Friday, November 26, 2021 2:43:12 AM

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Sarrriesfan wrote:
This definition?

Quote:
1.1 A section of roof enclosed by battlements.
‘I want to go up on the battlements’


As the dictionary also says.

Quote:
NOUN

usually battlements


Battlements are normally referred to in the plural form.

The moustache, possibly stubble.
Quote:
2Short, stiff hairs growing on a part of the body that has not been shaved for a while, especially on a man’s face.
‘she ran her fingers over the dark stubble on his cheeks’




Suppose I want to imply there were two tops as in of two towers, how do we do it?





Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, November 26, 2021 2:53:51 AM

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You say that there are battlements and two towers.

People will understand what that means.
Penz
Posted: Friday, November 26, 2021 10:26:31 AM

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Thank you so much!
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