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Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Friday, May 17, 2013 4:41:33 PM

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Joined: 9/21/2009
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Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Yes, beware the trolls, too.


Daveski
Posted: Friday, May 17, 2013 5:28:12 PM
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Location: Caer Sidi
They're everywhere. Whistle
leonAzul
Posted: Friday, May 17, 2013 9:22:13 PM

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Location: Miami, Florida, United States
Daveski wrote:
excaelis wrote:
All except Shredni Vashtar, The Great Polecat Ferret !





[image not available]


The mink would eat him too.

Anecdotally, I have heard the word "polecat" to refer to any musteline mammal that has a particularly strong odor to it.

According to TFD, it is originally a reference to a European animal, later adopted to the American skunk.
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/polecat

Sorry to hear about the potholes in your lawn.
Whistle
leonAzul
Posted: Saturday, May 18, 2013 12:39:49 AM

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excaelis wrote:
All except Shredni Vashtar, The Great Polecat Ferret !


Thank you so much for introducing me to The Chronicles of Clovis by Saki. That is some wickedly imaginative writing. It reminds me of John Collier (Fancies and Good Nights), but more subtle.
Applause

almostfreebird
Posted: Saturday, May 18, 2013 8:14:41 AM
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Location: Japan
Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
Yes, beware the trolls, too.








You know you yourself was once troll in some thread ;)




Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Saturday, May 18, 2013 1:26:45 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 46,881
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Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
You're calling me names, man? That's an insult.
Just show me one thread here where I'm trolling.

I can show you some threads where you've been off-topic and threadjacking.
Tovarish
Posted: Monday, May 20, 2013 9:39:42 PM
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Location: Booligal, New South Wales, Australia
This is the first time I have opened this topic, they are cute little things and the cat doesn't seem intimidated in the first photo.

Are they herbivores or are they digging for grubs?

What happens when a home owner has a dog?

We don't have anything like it down here but we do have ferrets, nasty, bitey, stinky animals.

We do have Tasmanian Devils and they have a perpetual bad mood.
Arfax
Posted: Tuesday, May 21, 2013 10:09:45 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/29/2010
Posts: 103
Neurons: 273
Location: France
In french, the term for badger ("blaireau") is also understood as 1) an insult, equivalent to "boor" 2) "shaving brush" because these are traditionnally made out of badgers' hairs.

I have ferreted this out :

The 3 musketeers did not have to watch over the Queen's ferrets, "ferrets" in french are jewels - at least at this period, the term has mainly survived because of Alexandre Dumas's novel.
"Furet" is the french word for ferrets.

Meanwhile, the french king certainly wore his coat made of ermine fur (Mustela erminea).

Ermine's tails are also hieraldic symbols, attached in particular to Brittany .

I'm not sure ermines are so patient as to sit on a Lady's lap and enjoy being scratched, but Leonardo decided they could be

almostfreebird
Posted: Tuesday, May 21, 2013 11:29:31 AM
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excaelis
Posted: Tuesday, May 21, 2013 4:24:38 PM

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afb, are you badgering JJ or just stoating the fire of debate, maybe. Ermine a quandary here. It's not ferret all, you know.
RuthP
Posted: Tuesday, May 21, 2013 5:46:39 PM

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excaelis wrote:
afb, are you badgering JJ or just stoating the fire of debate, maybe. Ermine a quandary here. It's not ferret all, you know.

GROAN . . . How do you think of these‽
leonAzul
Posted: Tuesday, May 21, 2013 8:26:34 PM

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Location: Miami, Florida, United States
excaelis wrote:
afb, are you badgering JJ or just stoating the fire of debate, maybe. Ermine a quandary here. It's not ferret all, you know.


Polecat!
Whistle

(Just to be clear, in parts of the US that exclamation can mean "outstanding!" in a good way.)

excaelis
Posted: Wednesday, May 22, 2013 10:03:48 PM

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Sorry guys. I've been raccoon my brains for an appropriate response...
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Tuesday, August 31, 2021 1:16:59 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 46,881
Neurons: 663,179
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Sometimes you bump into some old thread where a lot of good old members had some joy.
I miss you excaelis, Tov, RuthP...
tautophile
Posted: Saturday, November 20, 2021 10:30:20 PM
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Animals are usually identified by their scientific name--the name of their genus (generic name) and the name of their species (specific name). Those whose generic name is the same as their specific name are called "tautonyms". Tautonyms like Meles meles (badger) and Mephitis mephitis (skunk) are mentioned above. Other well-know tautonyms are Bison bison, the bison or American buffalo, and Alces alces, the American moose (also called elk in Europe). I have collected and recorded several hundred tautonym from the zoological nomenclature, as well as some near-misses, e.g. Babyrousa babyrussa (babirusa, a wild pig), and some multi-language quasi-tautonyms like Diceros bicornis, the black or two-horned rhinoceros, whose scientific name translates as "two-horn two-horn" in Greek and Latin, respectively. You can find out more about tautonyms at the website https://www.curioustaxonomy.net/word/tautonym.html.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Sunday, November 21, 2021 2:54:32 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
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Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
In Finnish Meles meles is called mäyrä, are you surprised?
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