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Should it be *charged with" instead? Options
Koh Elaine
Posted: Tuesday, September 14, 2021 7:41:35 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 7,354
Neurons: 31,828
Unfortunately, he lost it all in the late '80s when he opened a karaoke bar but was charged for running an illegal business without a license.

Should it be "charged with" instead?

Thanks!
Ruthania
Posted: Wednesday, September 15, 2021 3:58:54 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 7/20/2021
Posts: 20
Neurons: 103

Koh Elaine wrote:
... running an illegal business without a license.



This statement suggests that if you have a license it's OK to run an illegal business!

Better is ...running a illegal business without a license.

Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, September 15, 2021 4:55:20 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 45,388
Neurons: 648,814
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
To be charged with something is to be accused of some crime.
To be charged for something is to be asked some price of something.
Wilmar (USA) 1M
Posted: Wednesday, September 15, 2021 9:35:04 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/4/2015
Posts: 6,231
Neurons: 1,361,189
Location: Vinton, Iowa, United States
Yes, the standard expression is "charged with"... He was charged with disturbing the peace, or speeding, or or DUI, or
any such thing.
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