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make a cup of/sniff at Options
Penz
Posted: Saturday, July 24, 2021 9:41:43 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/26/2021
Posts: 602
Neurons: 4,424
Quote:
'Er- shall I make a cup of tea?' said Ron.

There were 4 people there, why say "I make a cup of tea"?

What does it mean when someone crosses their fingers while lying?


Quote:
Kep' goin' over horrible stuff in me mind.

Does it mean "thinking about CAREFULLY" or something else?


Quote:
..to sniff hopefully at the air.

Why not "sniff the air" or "sniff in the air"?
We do use sniff something, don't we?
What's the difference?


Quote:
squinting through the semi-darkness to the foot of his bed....

Does "foot of the bed" mean the ground part at the end of the bed or the surface of the bed?
And if it is on the ground, how can he see it as he is sitting up on the bed?

Also, what's the difference between "in the bed" and "on the bed"?
I have heard both of them being used every now and then.



Quote:
His eyes moved from the golden registration number at the top of the handle right down to the perfectly smoothz streamlined birch twigs that made up the tail.

Does "registration number" mean the "sequence number of it being manufactured" or "the number for it being sold to someone"?


Quote:
Ron ripped apart the Firebolt's wrappings.

Why not simply "wrapping"?
And do we use both of them, if yes, what is the difference.


Thank you all.



Sarrriesfan
Posted: Saturday, July 24, 2021 12:54:55 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 2,865
Neurons: 18,195
Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Penz wrote:
Quote:
'Er- shall I make a cup of tea?' said Ron.

There were 4 people there, why say "I make a cup of tea"?
Its a set phrase in British English, make a cup of tea means make a cup of tea for everybody.
What does it mean when someone crosses their fingers while lying?
Its a tradition, to ward of the evil that comes from lying. It comes from an older Christian tradition of crossing the fingers in benidiction.

[quote]Kep' goin' over horrible stuff in me mind.

Does it mean "thinking about CAREFULLY" or something else?
It means they could not get the thoughts of horrible things that might happen from their mind.


Quote:
..to sniff hopefully at the air.

Why not "sniff the air" or "sniff in the air"?
We do use sniff something, don't we?
What's the difference?


Quote:
squinting through the semi-darkness to the foot of his bed....

Does "foot of the bed" mean the ground part at the end of the bed or the surface of the bed?
And if it is on the ground, how can he see it as he is sitting up on the bed?
It means the space at the end of the bed, from the floor upwards. You can see a person standing at the foot of your bed as they are higher than the mattress.
Also, what's the difference between "in the bed" and "on the bed"?
I have heard both of them being used every now and then.
In the bed, underneath the top layers of the covers, blankets or duvet and the bottom sheet and mattress. On the bed on top of the bedding of the bed.


Quote:
His eyes moved from the golden registration number at the top of the handle right down to the perfectly smoothz streamlined birch twigs that made up the tail.

Does "registration number" mean the "sequence number of it being manufactured" or "the number for it being sold to someone"?

We can’t tell, it could be a serial number, or the number assigned to it when it was licensed and registered. It depends on how the Wizarding world does these things.
Quote:
Ron ripped apart the Firebolt's wrappings.

Why not simply "wrapping"?
And do we use both of them, if yes, what is the difference.


Thank you all.

Penz
Posted: Sunday, July 25, 2021 12:14:10 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/26/2021
Posts: 602
Neurons: 4,424
Thank you.
Though you missed a few questions.
And what does "go over stuff in mind" mean?
To think carefully or something else?
thatenglishbloke
Posted: Sunday, July 25, 2021 12:42:27 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 11/16/2020
Posts: 29
Neurons: 272
No, if we're going to be pedants, which we are! :) Quoting you:
You wrote: [Its] a set phrase. You meant [It's] a set phrase.

[It's] with an apostrophe is short for [it is]. [Its] implies [belonging to it], but usage dictates that although the pronoun [its] is a possessive, it shares (with his and hers) the absence of an apostrophe. This distinguishes the usage from the apostrophe which stands in for the absent letter 'i' in [it's], the contraction of [it is].
Other possessives, e.g. Tom's wallet, the army's tanks, England's cities, all have apostrophes to indicate possession. [Its] is the paradoxical exception to that rule.
Penz
Posted: Sunday, July 25, 2021 3:10:11 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/26/2021
Posts: 602
Neurons: 4,424
Quote:
..to sniff hopefully at the air.

Why not "sniff the air" or "sniff in the air"?
We do use sniff something, don't we?
What's the difference?



Quote:
Ron ripped apart the Firebolt's wrappings.

Why not simply "wrapping"?
And do we use both of them, if yes, what is the difference.


And what does "go over stuff in mind" mean?
To think carefully or something else?

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