mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest
Fresh, up the pitch, in the showers Options
Penz
Posted: Friday, June 4, 2021 4:02:08 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 2/26/2021
Posts: 406
Neurons: 2,794
All these excerpts are taken from "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban".

Quote:
Full of fresh determination, he urged his broom through the turbulent air..

Does "fresh" mean "new" or "full of energy and vigor"?

Harry looked wildly around. Cedric Diggory was pelting up the pitch, and a tiny speck of gold was shimmering in the rain-filled air between them....
What does "pelting up the pitch " mean here?


Gryffindors has lost the match and Harry is in the hospital wing.
Quote:
'Where is Wood? ' said Harry,
suddenly realising he wasn't there.
'Still in the showers' said Fred. 'We think he's trying to drown himself.'

Does "shower" mean "bathroom" or "the rain"?
Why "showers" instead of simply "shower"?
Why "in the showers" as opposed to simply "in showers"?


Harry's broom has broken now.
Quote:
Slowly, she reached down for a bag at her feet, turned it upside-town and tipped a dozen bits of splintered wood and twig onto the bed, the only remains of Harry's faithful, finally beaten broomstick.

I can get "bits of splintered wood" as there was only one piece of wood, that is, the handle of the broom. However "and twig" ?
There were actually many twigs?



Does "beaten" means "physically beaten" as it had fallen into the Whomping Willow or "figuratively lost"?


Harry is going to ask if they are having a replay of the match during which he collapsed.
Quote:
No one said anything. The horrible truth sank into Harry like a stone.
'We didn't - lose?

I know it's a metaphor. But it must refer to something?



Only one match has come to pass, that is, Gryffindor vs Hufflepuff. Now they (Gryffindor team) are in the hospital wing, discussing how can they still win- They have lost the match.

Quote:
"It's not over yet, said Fred. We lost by a hundred points, right? So if Hufflepuff loses to Ravenclaw and we beat Ravenclaw and Slytherin..."

"Hufflepuff'll have to lose by at least two hundred points." said George.

"But if they beat Ravenclaw..."

"No way. Ravenclaw is too good. But if Slytherin loses against Hufflepuff.."

"It all depends on the points- a margin of a hundred either way-"


I don't understand this completely. How can they still win? I'm not generally interested in sports.

Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, June 4, 2021 5:00:38 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 2,636
Neurons: 16,744
Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Penz wrote:
All these excerpts are taken from "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban".

Quote:
Full of fresh determination, he urged his broom through the turbulent air..

Does "fresh" mean "new" or "full of energy and vigor"?

Harry looked wildly around. Cedric Diggory was pelting up the pitch, and a tiny speck of gold was shimmering in the rain-filled air between them....
What does "pelting up the pitch " mean here?
Fresh here means new.
Pelting up the pitch means running towards the opposing teams goal. In Britain it’s common to orientate positions on a pitch as downwards towards the goal you are defending, up the opposition goal.



Gryffindors has lost the match and Harry is in the hospital wing.
Quote:
'Where is Wood? ' said Harry,
suddenly realising he wasn't there.
'Still in the showers' said Fred. 'We think he's trying to drown himself.'

Does "shower" mean "bathroom" or "the rain"?
Why "showers" instead of simply "shower"?
Why "in the showers" as opposed to simply "in showers"?
Shower here means in an area of a sports changing room that has facilities to shower in it. It’s not a bathroom, it’s showers because there are facilities there to enable multiple people to shower at once whole sports teams or classes of pupils.
The showers is a particular area of the changing room.m



Harry's broom has broken now.
Quote:
Slowly, she reached down for a bag at her feet, turned it upside-town and tipped a dozen bits of splintered wood and twig onto the bed, the only remains of Harry's faithful, finally beaten broomstick.

I can get "bits of splintered wood" as there was only one piece of wood, that is, the handle of the broom. However "and twig" ?
There were actually many twigs?



Does "beaten" means "physically beaten" as it had fallen into the Whomping Willow or "figuratively lost"?



Only one match has come to pass, that is, Gryffindor vs Hufflepuff. Now they (Gryffindor team) are in the hospital wing, discussing how can they still win- They have lost the match.

Quote:
"It's not over yet, said Fred. We lost by a hundred points, right? So if Hufflepuff loses to Ravenclaw and we beat Ravenclaw and Slytherin..."

"Hufflepuff'll have to lose by at least two hundred points." said George.

"But if they beat Ravenclaw..."

"No way. Ravenclaw is too good. But if Slytherin loses against Hufflepuff.."

"It all depends on the points- a margin of a hundred either way-"


I don't understand this completely. How can they still win? I'm not generally interested in sports.



In Hogwarts each of the house teams play Quidditch against each other in a league system, points will be given to sides for winning matches and drawing them normally you get more points for a win than a draw (In football it’s 3 for a win 1 for a draw) .
There are also mechanisms in place to account for how many points you have scored in matches and how many have been scored against you, these normally come into play when two teams have accumulated the same number of points for winning, losing or drawing matches.
The team with the best ratio of points for them compared to against wins. So they are making calculations about how many points they have scored and how many Hufflepuff have and how much Hufflepuff have to allow to be scored against them to win the league.
sportsherald
Posted: Friday, June 4, 2021 2:15:37 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 2/8/2015
Posts: 45
Neurons: 425,587
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Within the context provided:


'fresh' means renewed or reinvigorated.
'pelting up the pitch' describes someone running vigorously on a sports field.
'in the showers' refers to the multiple showers (often multiple showerheads within one open room) adjacent to a locker room.
'a dozen bits of splintered wood and twig' means roughly 12 fragments, some originating from the finished broomstick, some from twigs that got mixed in during its destruction.
'beaten broomstick' appears to have the double meaning of defeated and physically damaged.
'sank into Harry like a stone' is a metaphor that is not in general use, but it describes the sad, heavy feeling Harry had on receiving the news.
Penz
Posted: Saturday, June 5, 2021 6:01:51 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 2/26/2021
Posts: 406
Neurons: 2,794
Why "bits of twig" instead of "bits of twigs"?
As there were many twigs on the broomstick.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, June 5, 2021 7:36:53 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 35,277
Neurons: 241,541
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
It's normal in English when speaking about something which has been divided (broken, cut up, torn, etc) to use the noun as a singular uncountable noun.

If you tear five sheets of paper into four, you have twenty pieces of paper. (not "pieces of papers")

Five pizzas, cut into six triangles each gives you thirty slices of pizza. (not "slices of pizzas")

If three bottles are dropped and break, you might say "There are bits of bottle all over the floor." (not "bits of bottles")

Several twigs from the broom are broken to bits - what you have is "lots of bits of twig". (not "bits of twigs")
Penz
Posted: Wednesday, June 9, 2021 12:23:25 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 2/26/2021
Posts: 406
Neurons: 2,794
Does "beaten" means "physically beaten" as it had fallen into the Whomping Willow or "figuratively lost"?
sportsherald
Posted: Friday, June 11, 2021 4:05:15 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 2/8/2015
Posts: 45
Neurons: 425,587
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Penz wrote:
Does "beaten" means "physically beaten" as it had fallen into the Whomping Willow or "figuratively lost"?


As I said before, it appears to mean both, i.e. the double meaning of defeated *and* physically damaged.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.