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More so than, very well, a moment or two Options
Penz
Posted: Monday, May 31, 2021 10:22:34 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 2/26/2021
Posts: 406
Neurons: 2,794
All these excerpts are taken from the book "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban".

Dumbledore asks Snape if the search for Black has been conducted successfully.
Quote:
'All searched...'
'Very well, Severus. I didn't really expect Black to linger.

Does "Very well" here mean..
"Good job" or "I heard you" or something else. What exactly does Dumbledore want to convey?

If he didn't really think Black would linger then why run search or is he saying that Black is lingering somewhere where they can't find him?


Dumbledore is going to inform Dementors that the search is complete.
Quote:
'Didn't they want to help, sir? ' said Percy.
'Oh yes,' said Dumbledore coldly. 'But I'm afraid no Dementors will cross the threshold of this castle while I'm Headmaster.'

First, there's no reason for a cold reply?
Second, did he mean doors' thresholds by saying "threshold of this castle "?



Quote:
She stared at Harry for a moment or two.

Moment is a unidentifiable duration.
It could be a second or simply a minute.
A moment = uncertain amount of time.
A moment or two = uncertain amount of time?
What's the difference?



Quote:
Flint's just been to see me.

I think it would be more appropriate
"Flint's just been here to see me."
Is this correct?



Wood is talking about Hufflepuff team.
Quote:
They've got a new captain and Seeker.

Why not "a new captain and a Seeker"?
Several times I have seen constructions where both nouns contain articles.
Why is it so?


They are talking about the team and it's captain.
Quote:
Diggory's put a very strong side together.

Put a strong side together??
What does it mean?
And if the side is singular, how could one put a single thing "together"?



Quote:
'Oliver, calm down!' said Fred,
looking slightly alarmed. 'We're taking Hufflepuff very seriously. Seriously.'

What exactly does second "seriously" mean?


Quote:
The Slytherin team were looking very smug indeed, and none more so than Malfoy.


None more than Malfoy.
None more so than Malfoy.
What's the difference?

FounDit
Posted: Monday, May 31, 2021 2:56:28 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 15,996
Neurons: 76,374
Penz wrote:
All these excerpts are taken from the book "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban".

Dumbledore asks Snape if the search for Black has been conducted successfully.
Quote:
'All searched...'
'Very well, Severus. I didn't really expect Black to linger.

Does "Very well" here mean..
"Good job" or "I heard you" or something else. What exactly does Dumbledore want to convey?
It has the sense of "very good", or "good job".

If he didn't really think Black would linger then why run search or is he saying that Black is lingering somewhere where they can't find him?
He didn't expect him to linger, but just to make sure, he had the search done. He wasn't entirely convinced that Black was gone.

Dumbledore is going to inform Dementors that the search is complete.
Quote:
'Didn't they want to help, sir? ' said Percy.
'Oh yes,' said Dumbledore coldly. 'But I'm afraid no Dementors will cross the threshold of this castle while I'm Headmaster.'

First, there's no reason for a cold reply?
He doesn't like Dementors. That's the reason for the coldness. He has no fondness for them.
Second, did he mean doors' thresholds by saying "threshold of this castle "?

Thresholds of every door. They were not permitted to enter at all.

Quote:
She stared at Harry for a moment or two.

Moment is a unidentifiable duration.
It could be a second or simply a minute.
A moment = uncertain amount of time.
A moment or two = uncertain amount of time?
What's the difference?
Usually, a moment is less than a minute by quite a lot. I tend to think of a moment like this as being about 1 to 2 seconds.


Quote:
Flint's just been to see me.

I think it would be more appropriate
"Flint's just been here to see me."
Is this correct?

You could say it this way, but it's fine as it is. Since he was there and saw "me", he obviously was "here".

Wood is talking about Hufflepuff team.
Quote:
They've got a new captain and Seeker.

Why not "a new captain and a Seeker"?
Several times I have seen constructions where both nouns contain articles.
Why is it so?
You can have a compound subject, or you can emphasize each individual in the subject. Both are acceptable.

They are talking about the team and it's captain.
Quote:
Diggory's put a very strong side together.

Put a strong side together??
What does it mean?
And if the side is singular, how could one put a single thing "together"?
The teams in a sporting event are the two "sides". So a side is a group, or a team.


Quote:
'Oliver, calm down!' said Fred,
looking slightly alarmed. 'We're taking Hufflepuff very seriously. Seriously.'

What exactly does second "seriously" mean?
It means they are not thinking Hufflepuff will be easy to beat. They are aware they will have to work hard, they will have to be "serious" in their efforts, and not relax, thinking it will be easy.

Quote:
The Slytherin team were looking very smug indeed, and none more so than Malfoy.


None more than Malfoy.
No one looked more smug than Malfoy. He looked very smug and no one looked more smug.

None more so than Malfoy.
The word "so" represents "smug".
What's the difference?

Penz
Posted: Monday, May 31, 2021 8:56:23 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 2/26/2021
Posts: 406
Neurons: 2,794
Very well -does it express "I heard you" in other cases.

What's the definition of "seriously there". I couldn't find the applicable one.

A moment or two.
What's "or two" represent ? As you said a moment is itself 1 to 2 seconds.

Does "a captain and Seeker" represent there were only one person who was both and "a Seeker would imply there were two individuals?
FounDit
Posted: Monday, May 31, 2021 9:40:06 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 15,996
Neurons: 76,374
Penz wrote:
Very well -does it express "I heard you" in other cases.
Yes, it can mean that in some cases.

What's the definition of "seriously there". I couldn't find the applicable one.
I explained that, but this is

From TFD:

seriously (ˈsɪərɪəslɪ)
adv
1. in a serious manner or to a serious degree

[/color]
A moment or two.
What's "or two" represent ? As you said a moment is itself 1 to 2 seconds.
It's a very brief amount of time with no distinct number. What I said is probably true for most people, it's 1 to 2 seconds. If it's one second, then "or two" would be two seconds. If it's two seconds, the "or two" would be four seconds. It has no definite time period, just a very short amount of time.

Does "a captain and Seeker" represent there were only one person who was both and "a Seeker would imply there were two individuals?
It's two people. If the captain was doing both jobs, it would be worded that way, "They have a new person who is both captain and seeker".
Penz
Posted: Friday, June 4, 2021 2:53:13 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 2/26/2021
Posts: 406
Neurons: 2,794
We are taken them seriously. Seriously!

Why two seriously what is its significance?

No they were only one person.
A captain and Seeker.


Then why have we no used "a" before Seeker?
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, June 4, 2021 3:10:27 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 2,636
Neurons: 16,744
Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Penz wrote:
We are taken them seriously. Seriously!

Why two seriously what is its significance?

No they were only one person.
A captain and Seeker.


Then why have we no used "a" before Seeker?


They are one person who has two roles as captain and as seeker, but it’s still one person doing both so in British English you only use “a” in front of the first one.
A new captain and a Seeker would mean they have two new team members, one that is captain and another that is Seeker.
Penz
Posted: Friday, June 4, 2021 7:41:16 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 2/26/2021
Posts: 406
Neurons: 2,794
And "Seriously" ?
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, June 4, 2021 11:34:36 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 2,636
Neurons: 16,744
Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
As FD has said they are taking them as a serious threat, taking due care and attention in their efforts to beat them,
In a serious manner or degree,

https://www.lexico.com/definition/seriously
Quote:
2With earnest intent; not lightly or superficially.


There are two seriously to emphasise how seriously they are taking them.
Penz
Posted: Wednesday, June 9, 2021 12:28:29 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 2/26/2021
Posts: 406
Neurons: 2,794
He is a captain and a seeker. (two person B.E)
He is a captain and Seeker. (one person)
Buy what about American English? Is it the same case there?


Quote:
They are one person who has two roles as captain and as seeker, but it’s still one person doing both so in British English you only use “a” in front of the first one.





Do we use noun noun without article in this case?
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