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Carmenex
Posted: Thursday, April 29, 2021 10:04:13 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,207
Neurons: 6,434
Hi, I would like to ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
The right approach to doing that should be to appropriately combine the following strategies.
One approach could be (that of ?) raising prices as much as they would still be/remain below competitors. This strategy would enable the organization to realize and maintain a large sales volume through a lower price and profit margins and (would?) raise entry barriers to prospective competitors.
Another strategy would be (that of ?) pricing some products at very low cost to entice customers to bring more traffic to its shops. This increased traffic will likely to create more visibility for higher-priced products (such as special X blends), thus increasing sales and building brand loyalty from (repeat?) customers (do you need it?).
The decision on whether to privilege one strategy over the other would depend on factors/variables including (the?) price sensitivity of demand and the organisation’s ability to keep costs low (for example, buying in greater bulk from suppliers would likely result in discounts).
FounDit
Posted: Thursday, April 29, 2021 11:02:32 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 15,996
Neurons: 76,374
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would like to ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
My suggestions:

The right approach to doing that should be to appropriately combine the following strategies.

One approach could be that of setting prices slightly below those of competitors. This strategy would enable the organization to realize and maintain a large sales volume through a lower price and profit margins and would raise entry barriers to prospective competitors.

Another strategy would be that of pricing some products at very low cost to entice customer traffic to its shops. This increased traffic will likely to create more visibility for higher-priced products (such as special X blends), thus increasing sales and building brand loyalty from repeat customer buying.

The decision on whether to privilege one strategy over the other would depend on factors such as price sensitivity and the organisation’s ability to keep costs low (for example, buying in greater bulk from suppliers [b]which would likely result
in discounts).
Carmenex
Posted: Monday, June 7, 2021 7:31:44 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,207
Neurons: 6,434
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would like to ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
My suggestions:

The right approach to doing that should be to appropriately combine the following strategies.

One approach could be that of setting prices slightly below those of competitors. This strategy would enable the organization to realize and maintain a large sales volume through a lower price and profit margins and would raise entry barriers to prospective competitors.

Another strategy would be that of pricing some products at very low cost to entice customer traffic to its shops. This increased traffic will likely to create more visibility for higher-priced products (such as special X blends), thus increasing sales and building brand loyalty from repeat customer buying.

The decision on whether to privilege one strategy over the other would depend on factors such as price sensitivity and the organisation’s ability to keep costs low (for example, buying in greater bulk from suppliers which would likely result
in discounts).


Hi FounDit, and thank you for your reply. Could I please ask you with what verb you would replace increasing before sales in the penultimate sentence?
FounDit
Posted: Monday, June 7, 2021 10:36:37 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 15,996
Neurons: 76,374
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would like to ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
My suggestions:

The right approach to doing that should be to appropriately combine the following strategies.

One approach could be that of setting prices slightly below those of competitors. This strategy would enable the organization to realize and maintain a large sales volume through a lower price and profit margins and would raise entry barriers to prospective competitors.

Another strategy would be that of pricing some products at very low cost to entice customer traffic to its shops. This increased traffic will likely to create more visibility for higher-priced products (such as special X blends), thus increasing sales and building brand loyalty from repeat customer buying.

The decision on whether to privilege one strategy over the other would depend on factors such as price sensitivity and the organisation’s ability to keep costs low (for example, buying in greater bulk from suppliers which would likely result
in discounts).


Hi FounDit, and thank you for your reply. Could I please ask you with what verb you would replace increasing before sales in the penultimate sentence?

My first thought is to use "expand". You could also use "multiply", but I think expand works best.
Carmenex
Posted: Tuesday, June 8, 2021 6:51:11 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,207
Neurons: 6,434
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would like to ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
My suggestions:

The right approach to doing that should be to appropriately combine the following strategies.

One approach could be that of setting prices slightly below those of competitors. This strategy would enable the organization to realize and maintain a large sales volume through a lower price and profit margins and would raise entry barriers to prospective competitors.

Another strategy would be that of pricing some products at very low cost to entice customer traffic to its shops. This increased traffic will likely to create more visibility for higher-priced products (such as special X blends), thus increasing sales and building brand loyalty from repeat customer buying.

The decision on whether to privilege one strategy over the other would depend on factors such as price sensitivity and the organisation’s ability to keep costs low (for example, buying in greater bulk from suppliers which would likely result
in discounts).


Hi FounDit, and thank you for your reply. Could I please ask you with what verb you would replace increasing before sales in the penultimate sentence?

My first thought is to use "expand". You could also use "multiply", but I think expand works best.


Thank you, FounDit. Could I please ask you if thus bumping up sales, thus raising sales, or thus improving sales are as appropriate as thus expanding sales, and why?
Should it not be from repeat customers buying.?
FounDit
Posted: Tuesday, June 8, 2021 11:27:54 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 15,996
Neurons: 76,374
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would like to ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
My suggestions:

The right approach to doing that should be to appropriately combine the following strategies.

One approach could be that of setting prices slightly below those of competitors. This strategy would enable the organization to realize and maintain a large sales volume through a lower price and profit margins and would raise entry barriers to prospective competitors.

Another strategy would be that of pricing some products at very low cost to entice customer traffic to its shops. This increased traffic will likely to create more visibility for higher-priced products (such as special X blends), thus increasing sales and building brand loyalty from repeat customer buying.

The decision on whether to privilege one strategy over the other would depend on factors such as price sensitivity and the organisation’s ability to keep costs low (for example, buying in greater bulk from suppliers which would likely result
in discounts).


Hi FounDit, and thank you for your reply. Could I please ask you with what verb you would replace increasing before sales in the penultimate sentence?

My first thought is to use "expand". You could also use "multiply", but I think expand works best.


Thank you, FounDit. Could I please ask you if thus bumping up sales, thus raising sales, or thus improving sales are as appropriate as thus expanding sales, and why?
The different words imply somewhat different definitions, of course. "bumping" is very informal, but is understandable. You could use it, if you wanted to include colloquial speech.

"raising" tends to convey the idea of elevating, as in lifting up. While not exactly what you intend, it could be used as most people would understand that you really mean "increasing".

As for "improving", a sale can't really be improved, it's the number of sales that improve. However, most people would understand that is what you intend to say.

Since most would understand what is meant, all of these could be used. I chose expand because I thought it conveyed the idea more precisely.

Should it not be from repeat customers buying.?
I think not. It isn't the customers that are repeating so much as the buying of those customers. The focus is on the purchases, not the number of times the customer comes into the place of business.
Carmenex
Posted: Saturday, June 12, 2021 9:39:01 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,207
Neurons: 6,434
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would like to ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
My suggestions:

The right approach to doing that should be to appropriately combine the following strategies.

One approach could be that of setting prices slightly below those of competitors. This strategy would enable the organization to realize and maintain a large sales volume through a lower price and profit margins and would raise entry barriers to prospective competitors.

Another strategy would be that of pricing some products at very low cost to entice customer traffic to its shops. This increased traffic will likely to create more visibility for higher-priced products (such as special X blends), thus increasing sales and building brand loyalty from repeat customer buying.

The decision on whether to privilege one strategy over the other would depend on factors such as price sensitivity and the organisation’s ability to keep costs low (for example, buying in greater bulk from suppliers which would likely result
in discounts).


Hi FounDit, and thank you for your reply. Could I please ask you with what verb you would replace increasing before sales in the penultimate sentence?

My first thought is to use "expand". You could also use "multiply", but I think expand works best.


Thank you, FounDit. Could I please ask you if thus bumping up sales, thus raising sales, or thus improving sales are as appropriate as thus expanding sales, and why?
The different words imply somewhat different definitions, of course. "bumping" is very informal, but is understandable. You could use it, if you wanted to include colloquial speech.

"raising" tends to convey the idea of elevating, as in lifting up. While not exactly what you intend, it could be used as most people would understand that you really mean "increasing".

As for "improving", a sale can't really be improved, it's the number of sales that improve. However, most people would understand that is what you intend to say.

Since most would understand what is meant, all of these could be used. I chose expand because I thought it conveyed the idea more precisely.

Should it not be from repeat customers buying.?
I think not. It isn't the customers that are repeating so much as the buying of those customers. The focus is on the purchases, not the number of times the customer comes into the place of business.


Thank you, FounDit, for your explanation. And, is it possible to use the Saxon genitive, as follows ... and building brand loyalty from repeat customer's buying., or is from repeat customer buying a set phrase and, therefore, cannot be modified?
FounDit
Posted: Saturday, June 12, 2021 11:12:59 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 15,996
Neurons: 76,374
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would like to ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
My suggestions:

The right approach to doing that should be to appropriately combine the following strategies.

One approach could be that of setting prices slightly below those of competitors. This strategy would enable the organization to realize and maintain a large sales volume through a lower price and profit margins and would raise entry barriers to prospective competitors.

Another strategy would be that of pricing some products at very low cost to entice customer traffic to its shops. This increased traffic will likely to create more visibility for higher-priced products (such as special X blends), thus increasing sales and building brand loyalty from repeat customer buying.

The decision on whether to privilege one strategy over the other would depend on factors such as price sensitivity and the organisation’s ability to keep costs low (for example, buying in greater bulk from suppliers which would likely result
in discounts).


Hi FounDit, and thank you for your reply. Could I please ask you with what verb you would replace increasing before sales in the penultimate sentence?

My first thought is to use "expand". You could also use "multiply", but I think expand works best.


Thank you, FounDit. Could I please ask you if thus bumping up sales, thus raising sales, or thus improving sales are as appropriate as thus expanding sales, and why?
The different words imply somewhat different definitions, of course. "bumping" is very informal, but is understandable. You could use it, if you wanted to include colloquial speech.

"raising" tends to convey the idea of elevating, as in lifting up. While not exactly what you intend, it could be used as most people would understand that you really mean "increasing".

As for "improving", a sale can't really be improved, it's the number of sales that improve. However, most people would understand that is what you intend to say.

Since most would understand what is meant, all of these could be used. I chose expand because I thought it conveyed the idea more precisely.

Should it not be from repeat customers buying.?
I think not. It isn't the customers that are repeating so much as the buying of those customers. The focus is on the purchases, not the number of times the customer comes into the place of business.


Thank you, FounDit, for your explanation. And, is it possible to use the Saxon genitive, as follows ... and building brand loyalty from repeat customer's buying., or is from repeat customer buying a set phrase and, therefore, cannot be modified?

I'm not a grammar expert, but the genitive is awkward, IMO, and tends to convey the idea of "buying" as a verb to me, whereas the phrase, "from repeat customer buying" conveys the idea of "buying" as a gerund. This sounds more natural and correct to me.
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