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Penz
Posted: Sunday, May 2, 2021 11:53:06 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 2/26/2021
Posts: 330
Neurons: 2,120
I want to thanks Foundit who already provided me the answer to this question among the others. However, I don't understand.


Harry and Hermione has entered the hall

Quote:
People looked around at them as they passed along the back of the Hall..



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Suppose it's a hall.
If you they are moving along the back of the Hall.
Does it mean they are close to the wall and going towards the back of the wall?

Or they are already at the back of the Hall and moving along the back wall.?

Or they are at the centre and moving towards the back of the hall?


Audiendus
Posted: Monday, May 3, 2021 12:09:04 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/24/2011
Posts: 7,252
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Location: London, England, United Kingdom
Penz wrote:
Or they are already at the back of the Hall and moving along the back wall.?

That is what it means.
tautophile
Posted: Monday, May 3, 2021 12:18:16 AM
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Joined: 3/14/2018
Posts: 1,503
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They are already at the back of the hall and moving along the back wall.

Imagine that you are in a movie theater or an auditorium or a church. The stage or screen or altar is at the front of the room. The rows of seats or pews face the stage or screen; and behind them, at the back of the room, is usually an open space between the last row of seats and the back wall. There is usually an entrance or door in the center of the back wall, and very often there are doors at the back corners of the room; and the seats are arranged in rows on either side of the central passageway or aisle, and there are also aisles between the left and right walls of the room and the rows of seats. You, as a member of the audience or congregation, enter the room from the back, and go up one of the aisles to the row of seats or pews where you want to sit. If you come in the door on the right side of the back wall, but want to sit in a row on the left side of the room, then you would walk along the back wall--the back of the hall--to get to the left side, and from there you would go forward to your chosen row of seats.
Bathcoup
Posted: Monday, May 3, 2021 4:35:42 AM
Rank: Member

Joined: 2/24/2021
Posts: 72
Neurons: 1,632
Penz wrote:
I want to thanks Foundit who already provided me the answer to this question among the others. However, I don't understand.


Harry and Hermione has entered the hall

[quote]People looked around at them as they passed along the back of the Hall..



- - - - - - - - - - - - ** >
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thar
Posted: Monday, May 3, 2021 6:45:04 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 24,116
Neurons: 97,689
Along means the length of something- from one end towards the other end. So there has to be some road, line, wall, edge.

It is not moving towards one thing but following the length of that line.

You walk along the road
There are words painted along the fence
There is a wall along the side of the playground
You cut along the dotted line
The walk along the back of the hall.

Cut along the dotted line:


Here the line, the path of 'the back of the hall' is the line in bathcoup's diagram. Since it is a building, that wall is probably straight.
Wilmar (USA) 1M
Posted: Monday, May 3, 2021 7:26:38 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/4/2015
Posts: 5,937
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Location: Vinton, Iowa, United States
thar, I think Bathcoup doesn't understand what the hall is. His diagram suggests he thinks the hall is this:
1. A corridor or passageway in a building.
Rather than this:
2. A large entrance room or vestibule in a building; a lobby.


thar
Posted: Monday, May 3, 2021 7:46:13 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 24,116
Neurons: 97,689
Ah, yes, I could only see one line on my limited screen space.

Ignore the bottom line of that diagram and it works if one line is the wall at the back of the hall.


As you say, this is this sort of hall:



A corridor (hallway) does not have a front and a back.
A hall (Great Hall, dining hall, lecture hall, meeting hall) does, because things happen at the front and that is where people look towards. Nobody is looking towards the back.
Except maybe the people on the dais or stage, and they probably can't see because the back of the hall would be a long way away from them and out of the light.
Bathcoup
Posted: Monday, May 3, 2021 6:32:42 PM
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Joined: 2/24/2021
Posts: 72
Neurons: 1,632
thar wrote:
"Ah, yes, I could only see one line on my limited screen space.
Ignore the bottom line of that diagram and it works if one line is the wall at the back of the hall."
============================================================================================================

It wasn't exactly my diagram.

Audiendus and tautophile had already responded so ordinarily I shouldn’t have anything to say. However, I noticed a diagram, having two lines, in the original post. My
interpretation is that those two lines represent the front and the back of the Hall and the OP was also hoping someone can indicate where they started. I added a few
marks and carefully inserted a couple of blank lines to indicate that the diagram is not-to-scale. Perhaps I should have inserted two hundred blank lines!

I also thought about what’s causing him to not understand the sentence. I had a theory, no more than a speculation, which is not worth mentioning. Now I don’t mind posting it.
The root cause may be the meaning of “looked around”.

They’ve looked around for a new/used car to buy. - This can’t be right.

He’s looked around the house for his wallet (he misplaced it). - This can’t be right either.

He stood in the garden, looked around (by turning the body, without moving about), saw everything around him: the flowers, the grass etc. -- My speculation is that Penz
may be applying this meaning to the sentence, so he’s expecting a route resembling a U or at least an L. That is being a thinking learner.

I suspect those "People" were probably seated. They twisted their body a bit and turned the head around to look at Harry and Hermione as they passed along the back of the Hall.
Bathcoup
Posted: Tuesday, May 4, 2021 6:45:23 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 2/24/2021
Posts: 72
Neurons: 1,632
Wilmar (USA) 1M wrote:
thar, I think Bathcoup doesn't understand what the hall is. His diagram suggests he thinks the hall is this:
1. A corridor or passageway in a building. -- What on earth in your mind makes you think it's even a possibility!!!
Rather than this:
2. A large entrance room or vestibule in a building; a lobby. -- You think the Hall Harry and Hermione has entered is like this???

Our daughter’s school has a Sports Hall (hall) inside a large building. About three hundred metres away from our home is the Memorial Hall (hall), a standalone
building, often used for wedding, dancing etc. There’s an old Town Hall (hall) in our town centre ...... I ate in college Dining Halls, a very long time ago.

Your post really put me in a dilemma – If I don’t response, anyone reading it will think I’m illiterate. A diagram is a diagram. The diagram was
in the OP. Please do your homework and be discreet before firing off anything like "I think Bathcoup or any other Member doesn't understand ...".
Who doesn't understand what the hall Hall is?
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