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raymondaliasapollyon
Posted: Friday, April 30, 2021 2:52:38 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/14/2020
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Hi,

In the following sentence, does "we're all well rid of him" mean "we'll be much better without him"?

He was a nuisance and we're all well rid of him.


I'd appreciate your help.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, April 30, 2021 3:08:21 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 2,560
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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
raymondaliasapollyon wrote:
Hi,

In the following sentence, does "we're all well rid of him" mean "we'll be much better without him"?

He was a nuisance and we're all well rid of him.


I'd appreciate your help.


Yes it’s a commonly used phrase in British English, I don’t know if Americans use it though.
raymondaliasapollyon
Posted: Friday, April 30, 2021 9:10:48 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/14/2020
Posts: 501
Neurons: 2,919
I'm wondering whether it means "we'll be much better without him" or "we are much better without him."
Audiendus
Posted: Saturday, May 1, 2021 9:01:07 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/24/2011
Posts: 7,252
Neurons: 1,364,773
Location: London, England, United Kingdom
raymondaliasapollyon wrote:
I'm wondering whether it means "we'll be much better without him" or "we are much better without him."


"We're (we are) all well rid of him" means both now and in the future. He has gone now, and we don't expect him to come back.
FounDit
Posted: Saturday, May 1, 2021 10:40:25 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 15,744
Neurons: 75,132
Audiendus wrote:
raymondaliasapollyon wrote:
I'm wondering whether it means "we'll be much better without him" or "we are much better without him."


"We're (we are) all well rid of him" means both now and in the future. He has gone now, and we don't expect him to come back.


And it is used in AmE to mean we'll be better off (in better conditions) without him.
raymondaliasapollyon
Posted: Sunday, May 2, 2021 5:05:57 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/14/2020
Posts: 501
Neurons: 2,919
Audiendus wrote:
raymondaliasapollyon wrote:
I'm wondering whether it means "we'll be much better without him" or "we are much better without him."


"We're (we are) all well rid of him" means both now and in the future. He has gone now, and we don't expect him to come back.


Thank you. Are you saying "we're all well rid of him" means "we are much better without him, and we will continue to be so?


The Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary attaches an exaplantion to that sentence. It struck me as odd:

He was a nuisance and we're all well rid of him (= we'll be much better without him) .


FounDit
Posted: Sunday, May 2, 2021 11:20:36 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 15,744
Neurons: 75,132
raymondaliasapollyon wrote:
Audiendus wrote:
raymondaliasapollyon wrote:
I'm wondering whether it means "we'll be much better without him" or "we are much better without him."


"We're (we are) all well rid of him" means both now and in the future. He has gone now, and we don't expect him to come back.


Thank you. Are you saying "we're all well rid of him" means "we are much better without him, and we will continue to be so?
Yes.

The Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary attaches an exaplantion to that sentence. It struck me as odd:

He was a nuisance and we're all well rid of him (= we'll be much better without him) .
This is what the "we're all well rid" part means. We are, and will be, much better without him.

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