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difference between [take] and [get] a flu shot Options
robjen
Posted: Saturday, May 1, 2021 3:12:42 AM
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Joined: 2/17/2015
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(1a) I got a flu vaccine yesterday.
(1b) I took a flu vaccine yesterday.

(2a) I got a flu shot yesterday.
(2b) I took a flu shot yesterday.

What is the difference in meaning between "got" and "took"? Thank you very much.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Saturday, May 1, 2021 3:59:20 AM

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Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Normally they both mean the same, but strictly speaking, if you took it, you did it yourself, and if you got it, it was given by some medical person.
thar
Posted: Saturday, May 1, 2021 4:52:40 AM

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You take pills, you take medicine. But you don't take a vaccine. You don't take an injection. That sounds wrong.

I had/received... The vaccine/the vaccination/ a flu jab

Less elegant but commonly used:
I got...
sureshot
Posted: Saturday, May 1, 2021 7:36:01 AM
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Joined: 9/16/2015
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robjen wrote:
(1a) I got a flu vaccine yesterday.
(1b) I took a flu vaccine yesterday.

(2a) I got a flu shot yesterday.
(2b) I took a flu shot yesterday.

What is the difference in meaning between "got" and "took"? Thank you very much.

__________________

As already mentioned by thar, you are not likely to hear 1 (b) or 2 (b). We do speak of "taking medicine." This usually refers to oral medication and it always refers to medicine we administer to ourselves. However, your doctor or nurse will give you painkilling tablets or injections. The doctor is more likely to say, "I'll give you an injection". Vaccines are given by professionals.

You do not say "shot" in British English. "Shot" is common in American and Australian English. The word "jab" (e.g. flu jab) is common in British English. "Injection" and "vaccination" are more formal versions and they are common in both varieties of English especially when written down.

In my view "I had a vaccination for the flu yesterday", as well as "I had a flu vaccination yesterday", is nonstandard. Such a statement sounds like you are a medical representative or a courier for a vaccine delivery service and handled a flu vaccine the previous day! However, you might hear someone say "I had my vaccination for the flu yesterday" or more likely "I had my flu vaccination yesterday."

You are most likely to hear:

- I received a flu shot/jab/vaccine yesterday.
- I was given a flu shot/jab/vaccine yesterday.
- I was vaccinated against the flu yesterday.

Sarrriesfan
Posted: Saturday, May 1, 2021 8:01:12 AM

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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
In Scotland they use the term jag rather than shot or jab.
So “I received my flu jag yesterday.” is possible.

Ali Saleh hussain
Posted: Saturday, May 1, 2021 11:27:18 AM
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Posts: 1
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What about" Jab"? Jag, shoot...?(1915xx)(
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Saturday, May 1, 2021 11:34:48 AM

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Joined: 3/30/2016
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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Ali Saleh hussain wrote:
What about" Jab"?


As sureshot says jab is common in England and Wales, I am not sure about Northern Ireland though.
thar
Posted: Saturday, May 1, 2021 12:48:29 PM

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Joined: 7/8/2010
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A website for a practice in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

You can tell it is NI from the website address linked and phone area code.

They use 'jag'.

Quote:
Riverfront Medical
Contact Practice on 02871 314910
FLU / COVID-19 VACCINE INFORMATION
PLEASE CONTACT THE PRACTICE IF YOU HAVE NOT RECEIVED YOUR FLU JAG THIS YEAR. WE CAN NOW OFFER VACCINES TO 50-64YEAR OLDS
Find out about the COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout at nidirect.gov.uk/coronavirus



I do not know if GP practices are sectarian though! Whistle
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, May 1, 2021 5:50:31 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 35,085
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Interesting variations around the country.

I'm from England, but been living in Scotland for years.
"I had a/my flu injection yesterday." - this how I'd normally say it in conversation.
"I got my flu jab yesterday." - this is very informal.

I don't use "jag", but it's the most common word around here near Edinburgh.

Definitely not "took" - athers say, it sounds like you do it yourself, and it sounds oral.
The doctor gives you your medicine or pill and then you take it (swallow it).
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