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azz
Posted: Wednesday, April 7, 2021 8:44:47 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/15/2014
Posts: 401
Neurons: 4,108
a. I have been here since he left.

Could I use (a) if I was here even before he left?

I think (a) is saying that I came here when he left. But maybe one could use (a) if one has been here since before he left.

Many thanks.
Audiendus
Posted: Thursday, April 8, 2021 10:02:49 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/24/2011
Posts: 7,222
Neurons: 1,353,572
Location: London, England, United Kingdom
azz wrote:
a. I have been here since he left.

Could I use (a) if I was here even before he left?

Yes. The sentence in red gives no information about where I was before he left.
Bathcoup
Posted: Friday, April 9, 2021 6:19:54 AM
Rank: Member

Joined: 2/24/2021
Posts: 58
Neurons: 1,502
I’m puzzled, quite troubled, by “Yes. The sentence in red gives no information about where I was before he left.”
Sentence (a) gives no information about where else I was before he left, but it definitely implies "I'd not been here".

azz wrote: "But maybe one could use (a) if one has been here since before he left."

I’ve remained here since he left.
I’ve continued to be here since he left. - If you've described something you'd done before he left.
I’ve continued being here since he left. - Sounding a tad more scholarly, otherwise same as above
I have been here since before he left. - Acceptable, particularly in everyday conversation. Some people may not like the "since before" grouping. I think it's practical, and like it.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, April 9, 2021 6:33:38 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 35,016
Neurons: 237,972
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
In normal English, "I've been here since he left" says absolutely nothing about what occurred before he left.
I may have been here, I may have been somewhere else.

It would be common to add a word or two to clarify, if needed.

"I've been here ever since he left" implies that I arrived at that time.
"I've been here only since he left" SAYS that I wasn't here before.
"I've been here since before he left" says specifically that I was here earlier.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, April 9, 2021 6:55:30 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 2,506
Neurons: 15,972
Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
I agree it does not mean “I’d not been here”.
I have been here since he left, give us no context to what is happening.

“James was the line manager when I was hired he put me in the widgets department. I was hoping to get promoted to thingies, but I have been here since he left.”
“Mohammed said he was going to find Azid he told me to wait here 5 minutes ago, I have been here since he left.”

It gives no sense of what happened before, or how long the person has been there since “he” left.
Bathcoup
Posted: Sunday, April 11, 2021 5:01:22 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 2/24/2021
Posts: 58
Neurons: 1,502
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
In normal English, "I've been here since he left" says absolutely nothing about what occurred before he left.
You simply can't say the above unless you know what situation it is supposed to describe.
I may have been here, I may have been somewhere else.

It would be common to add a word or two to clarify, if needed.

"I've been here ever since he left" implies that I arrived at that time. - Not applicable to the situation.
"I've been here only since he left" SAYS that I wasn't here before. - Not applicable to the situation.
"I've been here since before he left" says specifically that I was here earlier. - This was in my previous post. Your point? Are you dismissing or recommending it for azz's situation?


Thanks for your response.
Sarrriesfan, Your examples may be useful for illustrating your point, which is slightly off-topic. I'll write a few lines at a later time.
Drag0nspeaker, I've inserted some comments (see above). Everything I'm writing here is based on my understanding, which is summarised below.

Azz has proposed a situation: “I was here even before he left” and “I have been here since he left.
(A more verbose version: I came here before he left, had stayed here until he left, and have been here since he left.)

Question: Can Sentence (a) "I have been here since he left." be used to describe the situation?

The above is my understanding. It's clear to me azz is seeking a information-giving statement, a complete sentence similar to Sentence (a) to describe the duration of my being here.


azz
Posted: Sunday, April 11, 2021 11:13:49 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/15/2014
Posts: 401
Neurons: 4,108
Bathcoup wrote:


Azz has proposed a situation: “I was here even before he left” and “I have been here since he left.
(A more verbose version: I came here before he left, had stayed here until he left, and have been here since he left.)

Question: Can Sentence (a) "I have been here since he left." be used to describe the situation?

The above is my understanding. It's clear to me azz is seeking a information-giving statement, a complete sentence similar to Sentence (a) to describe the duration of my being here.[/color]



Thank you all so much for your kind responses.

The slight disagreement I see here clarifies the situation. I wanted to know if (a) could be used in that situation. It seems that it could. It does not clash with the facts. Now, does it describe that situation? No, it doesn't, because it could also be used if I arrived when he left. It doesn't describe the latter situation either. It is non-committal as to when I arrived. One could say it is ambiguous (although calling it ambiguous is a bit of a stretch).

That's my take on it. I think you are all correct!

Many thanks.
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