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Ivan Fadeev
Posted: Tuesday, April 6, 2021 10:41:12 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/21/2015
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Is this correct?
This is no mine.
FounDit
Posted: Tuesday, April 6, 2021 11:00:27 AM

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Joined: 9/19/2011
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Ivan Fadeev wrote:
Is this correct?
This is no mine.


If you are speaking of a mine such as a gold mine, a silver mine, or a copper mine, then yes, it is correct. There is no mine means the mine does not exist.
Ivan Fadeev
Posted: Tuesday, April 6, 2021 12:39:55 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/21/2015
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I meant "this is not mine".
thar
Posted: Tuesday, April 6, 2021 1:29:27 PM

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Joined: 7/8/2010
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No
You are negating the verb.

This is not mine.
This isn't mine.

,
'no' negates a noun.




Unless you are speaking with a Scottish accent. Whistle


tautophile
Posted: Tuesday, April 6, 2021 1:30:15 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/14/2018
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A Scot, speaking in the Scots dialect, might say "It's no mine", but standard English would be "It's not mine", i.e., it does not belong to me.

As FounDit notes, "It's no mine" in standard English means "It's not a mine" (i.e., it's not a place where you dig for coal or diamonds or metal ores, etc.) It might be just a hole in the ground.

A mine can also be an explosive device usually buried in the ground (a land mine) or moored in the sea (a sea mine). "It's no mine" suggests that the thing being describe is neither of these.
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