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Growing up we were taught/have been taught. Options
Ashraful Haque Ashraf
Posted: Thursday, January 7, 2021 1:33:51 PM

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Joined: 11/5/2019
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I was asked "Do you think you can judge someone based on the kind of cloth the are wearing at work?"
I started my answer this way:
"Growing up we were taught not to judge a book by its cover. But the reality is that we do it all the time."

Have I used 'growing up' correctly in this sentence? I'm not sure if I should say 'growing up we have been taught' or 'we were taught.'

I'd really appreciate it if you could write a few more sentence with 'growing up.'
FounDit
Posted: Thursday, January 7, 2021 1:40:43 PM

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Ashraful Haque Ashraf wrote:
I was asked "Do you think you can judge someone based on the kind of clothes the are wearing at work?"
I started my answer this way:
"Growing up, we were taught not to judge a book by its cover. But the reality is that we do it all the time."

Have I used 'growing up' correctly in this sentence? I'm not sure if I should say 'growing up we have been taught' or 'we were taught.'
Yes, you have used it perfectly. You could also have said, "We were taught not to judge a book by its cover when we were growing up", or "When we were growing up, we were taught not to judge a book by its cover".

I'd really appreciate it if you could write a few more sentence with 'growing up.'
Wilmar (USA) 1M
Posted: Thursday, January 7, 2021 2:30:15 PM

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Never disagree w/ FounDit. Hardly every.
I just wanted to mention that FounDit's first suggested sentence can be misunderstood due to the sequence of the information in the sentence, as he shows it (no comma). The second sentence should be no problem at all.

The problem with the first sentence is that it might mean to some people, that it is only during your childhood that you should not judge a book by its cover.
The second sentence solves that problem by resequencing the information, and also using a comma to make the distinction between the two clauses.
Pher
Posted: Thursday, January 7, 2021 5:47:18 PM
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The first sentence should read like this. I was asked, "Do you think you can judge someone based on the kind of clothes they are wearing at work?"
Ashraful Haque Ashraf
Posted: Friday, January 8, 2021 3:04:40 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/5/2019
Posts: 196
Neurons: 5,438
FounDit wrote:
Ashraful Haque Ashraf wrote:
I was asked "Do you think you can judge someone based on the kind of clothes the are wearing at work?"
I started my answer this way:
"Growing up, we were taught not to judge a book by its cover. But the reality is that we do it all the time."

Have I used 'growing up' correctly in this sentence? I'm not sure if I should say 'growing up we have been taught' or 'we were taught.'
Yes, you have used it perfectly. You could also have said, "We were taught not to judge a book by its cover when we were growing up", or "When we were growing up, we were taught not to judge a book by its cover".

I'd really appreciate it if you could write a few more sentence with 'growing up.'


I might be wrong but I often hear people saying sentences like 'growing up it was drilled into our heads you've got to go to college....." Is this expression more common?
Ashraful Haque Ashraf
Posted: Friday, January 8, 2021 3:05:20 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/5/2019
Posts: 196
Neurons: 5,438
Pher wrote:
The first sentence should read like this. I was asked, "Do you think you can judge someone based on the kind of clothes they are wearing at work?"


Thank you so much. I wonder why 'clothes' is plural.
Romany
Posted: Friday, January 8, 2021 3:50:00 PM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Clothes is plural because we wear more than one item of clothing. (well actually I've lived in places where only one item of clothing is required!)

As to the 'growing-up' sentences: I'd say that the more colloquial expression is "when we were kids..."/when I was a kid."

There are a plethora of ways people express this idiomatically - no one particular way is preferable. Both your sentences are correct - use either. From time to time you'll come across it being expressed in lots of different ways, including:

"My mother/father/grandparent etc. used to say..."
"I had it drilled/thumped into me when I was a kid...."
"In our house, growing up, we were always being reminded..."
"My parents drummed X into me all through my childhood..."

Ashraful Haque Ashraf
Posted: Wednesday, January 13, 2021 2:18:32 AM

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Joined: 11/5/2019
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Romany wrote:

Clothes is plural because we wear more than one item of clothing. (well actually I've lived in places where only one item of clothing is required!)

As to the 'growing-up' sentences: I'd say that the more colloquial expression is "when we were kids..."/when I was a kid."

There are a plethora of ways people express this idiomatically - no one particular way is preferable. Both your sentences are correct - use either. From time to time you'll come across it being expressed in lots of different ways, including:

"My mother/father/grandparent etc. used to say..."
"I had it drilled/thumped into me when I was a kid...."
"In our house, growing up, we were always being reminded..."
"My parents drummed X into me all through my childhood..."



Thank you so much. Is it possible to use present perfect with such sentences? For example:
"Growing up I've been exposed to abuse."
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, January 13, 2021 6:29:42 AM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

No. Simple past is direct and grammatically more suitable.
Wilmar (USA) 1M
Posted: Wednesday, January 13, 2021 8:05:06 AM

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Location: Vinton, Iowa, United States
You asked about the word clothes. It isn't plural -- it simply is a word that ends in 's'.
definition (one of several, all very similar)

1. garments for the body; articles of dress; wearing apparel.

Clothes is simply a word that means garments -- apparel. It's whatever you are wearing today, regardless of the number of pieces involved.
Edit to add -- Yes, for grammatical purposes it is treated as plural, as in, my clothes are comfortable. Even when the number of clothing items you are wearing is one (long underwear) -- it is clothes.
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, January 13, 2021 12:55:55 PM
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Joined: 6/14/2009
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom


Well, actually it IS plural - it came into the language as being the plural form of 'cloth.' It came into use in the Middle English period - unsurprisingly because this was the era of the great cloth merchants. Thus huge volumes of trade between East & West for 'clothes' - the bales of cloth from which apparel and furnishings were made.

When its meaning started to shift in the 18thC to meaning the items that 'clothes' were made up into, it remained plural because it referred to all the items of apparel that were cut from a piece of cloth.
Ashraful Haque Ashraf
Posted: Thursday, January 14, 2021 1:49:07 AM

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Joined: 11/5/2019
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Romany wrote:

No. Simple past is direct and grammatically more suitable.


Thank you so much.
Ashraful Haque Ashraf
Posted: Thursday, January 14, 2021 1:50:03 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/5/2019
Posts: 196
Neurons: 5,438
Wilmar (USA) 1M wrote:
You asked about the word clothes. It isn't plural -- it simply is a word that ends in 's'.
definition (one of several, all very similar)

1. garments for the body; articles of dress; wearing apparel.

Clothes is simply a word that means garments -- apparel. It's whatever you are wearing today, regardless of the number of pieces involved.
Edit to add -- Yes, for grammatical purposes it is treated as plural, as in, my clothes are comfortable. Even when the number of clothing items you are wearing is one (long underwear) -- it is clothes.


I see. So I guess I should say "What kind of clothes will you be wearing to the party?"
Hope123
Posted: Thursday, January 14, 2021 9:46:51 AM

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Joined: 3/23/2015
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Location: Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
Ashraful Haque Ashraf wrote:
I was asked "Do you think you can judge someone based on the kind of cloth the are wearing at work?"
I started my answer this way:
"Growing up we were taught not to judge a book by its cover. But the reality is that we do it all the time."

Have I used 'growing up' correctly in this sentence? I'm not sure if I should say 'growing up we have been taught' or 'we were taught.'

We would say 'were' rather than 'have been' because the time period 'growing up' is specified so simple past is better.

The present perfect is used to indicate a link between the present and the past. The time of the action is before now but not specified, and we are often more interested in the result than in the action itself.




I'd really appreciate it if you could write a few more sentence with 'growing up.'


Hope123
Posted: Thursday, January 14, 2021 9:48:57 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/23/2015
Posts: 9,998
Neurons: 57,037
Location: Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
Ashraful Haque Ashraf wrote:
Wilmar (USA) 1M wrote:
You asked about the word clothes. It isn't plural -- it simply is a word that ends in 's'.
definition (one of several, all very similar)

1. garments for the body; articles of dress; wearing apparel.

Clothes is simply a word that means garments -- apparel. It's whatever you are wearing today, regardless of the number of pieces involved.
Edit to add -- Yes, for grammatical purposes it is treated as plural, as in, my clothes are comfortable. Even when the number of clothing items you are wearing is one (long underwear) -- it is clothes.


I see. So I guess I should say "What kind of clothes will you be wearing to the party?"


Well, yes, except we'd just say, "What are you wearing to the party?" Clothes and what kind would be understood and we are lazy speakers who keep things short when speaking.

:::
TFD - clothes (klōz, klōthz)
pl.n.
Ashraful Haque Ashraf
Posted: Saturday, January 16, 2021 3:33:20 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/5/2019
Posts: 196
Neurons: 5,438
Hope123 wrote:
Ashraful Haque Ashraf wrote:
Wilmar (USA) 1M wrote:
You asked about the word clothes. It isn't plural -- it simply is a word that ends in 's'.
definition (one of several, all very similar)

1. garments for the body; articles of dress; wearing apparel.

Clothes is simply a word that means garments -- apparel. It's whatever you are wearing today, regardless of the number of pieces involved.
Edit to add -- Yes, for grammatical purposes it is treated as plural, as in, my clothes are comfortable. Even when the number of clothing items you are wearing is one (long underwear) -- it is clothes.


I see. So I guess I should say "What kind of clothes will you be wearing to the party?"


Well, yes, except we'd just say, "What are you wearing to the party?" Clothes and what kind would be understood and we are lazy speakers who keep things short when speaking.

:::
TFD - clothes (klōz, klōthz)
pl.n.


I guess that means I need to learn the lazy way since I'm going to Canada this year for my Masters.
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