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Lay laid lied lie Options
Leah
Posted: Thursday, November 19, 2020 4:00:24 PM

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Location: Toledo, Ohio, United States
I have a lot of trouble with lay and laid and lie and lied. Is it proper to say "I laid down in the leaves."?
tautophile
Posted: Thursday, November 19, 2020 6:02:26 PM
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It would be OK to say "I laid myself down in the leaves". If you want to leave out the "myself", you should say "I lay down in the leaves", since "lay" is the past tense of "lie" but few people would object or misunderstand if you say "I laid down in the leaves" in an informal situation.

"Lie" and "lay" are easily confused. So are "lie" and "lie", and "lay" and "lay"...and "lain" and "lane".

Lie--1. A verb meaning "assume a horizontal condition". It does not take a direct object.
I lie on the bed right now
past tense(PT): lay I lay on the bed all last night.
past participle (PP): lain I have lain on the bed for three hours.

Lie--2. A verb meaning "tell a falsehood" (or a noun meaning the falsehood itself).
I lie when I don't tell the truth or when I tell a lie.
PT: lied I lied when I didn't tell the truth.
PP: lied I have lied before now.

Lay--1. Cause to assume a horizontal position or deposit something. It takes a direct object.
He lays the plate on the table.
PT: laid He laid the plate on the table. The chicken laid an egg in its nest.
PP: laid He has laid the plate on the table. The chicken has laid an egg in its nest.

Lay--2. An old song or poem or tale. The Lay of the Last Minstrel, a poem by Sir Walter Scott

Lane--3. A country road, or a part of a street. The country lane was narrow, but the motorway was four lanes wide.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, November 22, 2020 7:50:23 AM

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Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
tautophile wrote:
"Lie" and "lay" are easily confused. So are "lie" and "lie", and "lay" and "lay"...and "lain" and "lane".

AND Leah! Whistle

Sorry, couldn't resist!Silenced
Audiendus
Posted: Sunday, November 22, 2020 8:18:41 AM
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Here's a quiz question:

Away in a manger, no crib for a bed,
The little Lord Jesus...


Without looking it up, can you give the next word?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, November 22, 2020 9:15:26 AM

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I remember 'lay down his sweet head', I think.
It's decades since I sang it.

OOps - it should be 'laid down', shouldn't it, as it's transitive. Anxious Pray
lazarius
Posted: Sunday, November 22, 2020 9:35:20 AM

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Location: Kotel’niki, Moskovskaya, Russia
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
I remember 'lay down his sweet head', I think.

Quote:
To Lie, Lay

Theſe words have certainly a very different meaning, and are ſeldom uſed one for another, but when connected with other words, ſo as to form phraſes. To ſhew the impropriety of an indiſcriminate uſe of them, it will be ſufficient to point out the diſtinction in a few inſtances.

To lie by, implies, to remain ſtill; to lay by, means, to reſerve for ſome future time.

To lie down, implies, to reſt or repoſe oneſelf; to lay down, means, to depoſit, or to advance as a propoſition.

To lie in, implies, to be in childbed; to lay in, means, to ſtore.

To lie with, implies, to ſleep with; to lay with, means, to bet with.

To lie under, implies, to be ſubject to; to lay under, means, to ſubject to.

-
The Diſtinction between Words Eſteemed Synonymous, 1766-95, John Truſler

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Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, November 22, 2020 10:07:46 AM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Yes - that phrase remains the same. Quite a few of them still mean the same or very similar.

To lay down - to deposit.

So it's "to lay down his head" - and in the past tense "he laid down his sweet head", not "he lay down his sweet head".

Some of the others there have changed over the years. A couple are not used at all.
"To lie in" means to get up later than usual.
lazarius
Posted: Sunday, November 22, 2020 10:44:21 AM

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Location: Kotel’niki, Moskovskaya, Russia
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Some of the others there have changed over the years. A couple are not used at all.

I'm in the middle of restoring the third edition and can give you a copy if and when I carry the job through (if you are interested). Here's where I am:



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Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, November 22, 2020 12:14:50 PM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
lazarius wrote:
I'm in the middle of restoring the third edition and can give you a copy if and when I carry the job through (if you are interested).

That would be great - it seems a little like the COBUILD dictionaries, which explain the usage of words as much as their definitions.
This description of the "synonyms" 'wood' and 'timber' is (in a way) similar to a modern one I read last week - we loan someone money, or we lend them some money - we lend a hand to someone needing help, but we don't 'loan a hand'.

Those long 's'es take a bit of getting used to, though.
Tara2
Posted: Sunday, November 22, 2020 12:23:01 PM

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Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 2,758
Neurons: 10,477
lazarius wrote:
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Some of the others there have changed over the years. A couple are not used at all.

I'm in the middle of restoring the third edition and can give you a copy if and when I carry the job through (if you are interested). Here's where I am:



-

lazarius, you are writing a book?
lazarius
Posted: Sunday, November 22, 2020 2:16:58 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/27/2016
Posts: 913
Neurons: 1,096,169
Location: Kotel’niki, Moskovskaya, Russia
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
That would be great

And I need a critical evaluation of my work. :)

Drag0nspeaker wrote:
This description of the "synonyms" 'wood' and 'timber' is (in a way) similar to a modern one I read last week - we loan someone money, or we lend them some money - we lend a hand to someone needing help, but we don't 'loan a hand'.

I use a shortened name for my file. The book is called "The Diſtinction between Words Eſteemed Synonymous."

Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Those long 's'es take a bit of getting used to, though.

Just a bit.

Tara2 wrote:
lazarius, you are writing a book?

Heaven forfend! It is a very old book:

https://books.google.com/books?id=SJY_AAAAYAAJ&pg=RA1-PA61&dq=%22into+in+to%22

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Tara2
Posted: Sunday, November 22, 2020 3:12:08 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 2,758
Neurons: 10,477
lazarius wrote:
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
That would be great

And I need a critical evaluation of my work. :)

Drag0nspeaker wrote:
This description of the "synonyms" 'wood' and 'timber' is (in a way) similar to a modern one I read last week - we loan someone money, or we lend them some money - we lend a hand to someone needing help, but we don't 'loan a hand'.

I use a shortened name for my file. The book is called "The Diſtinction between Words Eſteemed Synonymous."

Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Those long 's'es take a bit of getting used to, though.

Just a bit.

Tara2 wrote:
lazarius, you are writing a book?

Heaven forfend! It is a very old book:

https://books.google.com/books?id=SJY_AAAAYAAJ&pg=RA1-PA61&dq=%22into+in+to%22

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Why heaven forfend? Don't you like to write a book? :)
lazarius
Posted: Monday, November 23, 2020 12:30:26 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/27/2016
Posts: 913
Neurons: 1,096,169
Location: Kotel’niki, Moskovskaya, Russia
Tara2 wrote:
Don't you like to write a book? :)

Nope. I do not like the idea.

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