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Human Echolocation Options
Daemon
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2020 12:00:00 AM
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Human Echolocation

Used by some blind people to navigate the world, human echolocation is a technique for establishing the locations and shapes of nearby objects by making sounds and interpreting the echoes that result. Sound-producing methods include tapping a cane, stamping, or making clicking noises with one's mouth. This sort of echolocation can provide blind practitioners with enough information to identify large objects by ear alone. What are some feats that blind people have accomplished using echolocation? More...
Ashwin Vemuri
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2020 12:03:14 AM

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Human Echolocation

Used by some blind people to navigate the world, human echolocation is a technique for establishing the locations and shapes of nearby objects by making sounds and interpreting the echoes that result. Sound-producing methods include tapping a cane, stamping, or making clicking noises with one's mouth. This sort of echolocation can provide blind practitioners with enough information to identify large objects by ear alone. What are some feats that blind people have accomplished using echolocation? More...
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2020 3:18:15 AM

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We know from other studies that those who use human sonar as a principal means of navigation are activating their visual brain. It’s the visual system that processes all of this, so vision is, in that sense, occurring in the brain.

It’s flashes. You do get a continuous sort of vision, the way you might if you used flashes to light up a darkened scene. It comes into clarity and focus with every flash, a kind of three-dimensional fuzzy geometry. It is in 3D, it has a 3D perspective, and it is a sense of space and spatial relationships. You have a depth of structure, and you have position and dimension. You also have a pretty strong sense of density and texture, that are sort of like the color, if you will, of flash sonar.

It does not possess the kind of high definition detailed precision that vision has. There’s a big difference in size, for example, between sound and light waves. And then there’s a difference in how the nervous system processes auditory information versus visual information, in how information is sent to the brain through the eye, as opposed to the ear. So you are, in some ways, comparing apples to oranges. But they’re both fruit, they’re both edible, there are a lot of similarities between them.


https://www.smithsonianmag.com
Wilmar (USA) 1M
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2020 4:50:06 PM

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I've heard of this. We have plenty of blind citizens in our area, and I wonder if any of them have been trained to use this. Or if it is as useful as what the article implies.
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