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VERBS THAT CAN NOT BE USED WITH PRESENT PERFECT...ARE THERE ANY? Options
jrsofiati
Posted: Thursday, September 10, 2020 2:25:49 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 9/10/2020
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Location: Blumenau, Santa Catarina, Brazil
The other day I was informed there are some verbs that are exceptions in relation to present perfect, that is,
they can not be used or are not very common with this verb tense.

Two examples that were given to me: TO GET and TO KNOW. In the case of the verb TO KNOW, according to what I was informed,
with the meaning of TO KNOW HOW / WHAT or TO KNOW ABOUT SOMETHING... would not be used with the present perfect.
Examples: I didn't know anything about her.
As it doesn't have finalization of time or definite time I always thought that the most correct would be to use the present perfect, that is:
I haven't known anything about her.

On the other hand, with the meaning of KNOWING ANY PERSON, PLACE OR THING could be used with present perfect.
Example: I haven't known all these people so far / I didn´t know all these people so far. Which one is the correct or more common?

Another case, the verb TO GET, what would be the correct way of the following sentence?
Have you got to sell your house? / Did you get to sell your house?

Is this information correct? Thank you very much!!
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, September 11, 2020 4:08:55 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 34,362
Neurons: 227,040
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hello jrsofiati.
Welcome to the forum.

I think that there may be a misunderstanding. There are verbs (including 'know' and some meanings of 'get') which are rarely used in the progressive or continuous tense. However, this is not true of the perfect.

"Get" is a very awkward verb - it has too many different meanings, and it is used sometimes when it's not needed ("I have got money in my pocket" says exactly the same as "I have money in my pocket.")

You can say "I get money every month" (present tense - habit) or "I have got money" (perfect), though it's better (my opinion) to say "I have money".
However "I am getting money" means something different - it shows something which is happening in the future. I'm getting money tomorrow, but I have none right now.

You say "I know how to . . ." but not "I am knowing how to . . .".
You can say "I have known how to . . . for ten years."
You say "I know her" or "I have known her for years."
But you don't say "I am knowing her."

I didn't know anything about her. - this says that it was true at some point in the past. "Yesterday, I didn't know anything about her, but now I do."
I haven't known anything about her. - this says that it is true for the past (up to the present), but says nothing about the future. It is more common to say "I don't know anything about her."
Quote:

Example: I haven't known all these people so far / I didn´t know all these people so far. Which one is the correct or more common?
Neither of them really - the second one is not correct, as it uses the past tense with "so far" which includes the present.
The common way to say it is "I don't know these people yet."
Quote:

Another case, the verb TO GET, what would be the correct way of the following sentence?
Have you got to sell your house? / Did you get to sell your house?

These are two completely different meanings of "get".
To me, the correct ways to say these are:
"Do you have to sell your house?"
"Did you get to sell your house?"
or "Were you able to sell your house?"

Overall - every verb can be used in all tenses and aspects in some contexts.
Some verbs (which have - included in their meaning - a duration) are more common in some tenses - other verbs (which occur at a POINT in time) use different tenses more often. Other verbs show a state, rather than an action - these use (most commonly) another different set of tenses.

"Be", "know", "understand", "have" all have a duration, and show a state (you don't "be" something just for an instant and then "not be" it) "Know" and "understand" are similar. If you knew someone yesterday, you still know them.
These verbs are not used in the progressive very often (though they CAN be in some circumstances).
"I understand what you say" not "I am understanding what you say."
However, they are used in the perfect "I have understood every lesson so far."


Audiendus
Posted: Tuesday, September 15, 2020 2:33:02 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/24/2011
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Is "know" ever used in a continuous tense? I cannot think of an example.

I can think of rare cases where "understand" is so used, e.g: "Can you stop and go back, please? I am not understanding what you are saying".
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 12:48:59 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 34,362
Neurons: 227,040
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Audiendus wrote:
Is "know" ever used in a continuous tense? I cannot think of an example.


Er . . . .Think . . . Hmmmmm . . . Think . . . well, now that you mention it, I can't think of one either.

Unless . . . maybe . . . do I remember Dr. Ahmed el Kabir using "I am knowing ________"?



Well, goodness gracious me!
thar
Posted: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 12:54:29 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 22,676
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It becomes an adjective with a different meaning.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 12:59:51 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 34,362
Neurons: 227,040
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Ah. I am all-knowing.
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