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Since I have time/Since I have the time. Options
Ashraful Haque Ashraf
Posted: Wednesday, July 29, 2020 4:47:10 PM

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I get confused between 'time' and 'the time.' Here's a context:

- I'll do it since I have time/ I'll do it since I have the time.

Are both of these correct depending on the context?

tautophile
Posted: Wednesday, July 29, 2020 5:05:13 PM
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Yes. Both are correct, and differ only very slightly in meaning or emphasis. If you say "I'll do it, since I have time", you mean "I have enough free time in the fairly near future to start and complete the task". If you say "...since I have the time", you mean "I feel I have enough time in the immediate future--now, more or less--to start and complete the task." You can also say "I'll have [the] time to do it tomorrow", meaning that you don't have time today, but will have time tomorrow.

Ashraful Haque Ashraf
Posted: Saturday, August 1, 2020 11:11:53 AM

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tautophile wrote:
Yes. Both are correct, and differ only very slightly in meaning or emphasis. If you say "I'll do it, since I have time", you mean "I have enough free time in the fairly near future to start and complete the task". If you say "...since I have the time", you mean "I feel I have enough time in the immediate future--now, more or less--to start and complete the task." You can also say "I'll have [the] time to do it tomorrow", meaning that you don't have time today, but will have time tomorrow.


Thank you for the answer. From what I understand"
- Since I have time= I have free time.
- Since I have the time= I have enough time for the task. It says that I have enough time to finish this particular task. The emphasis is on the particular task.

If I say "I'll practice speaking English now since I have the (time to do it) time" it would means that I can finish practicing English in the time I have.

And if I say "I'll practice speaking English now since I have time" it would mean that I have some free time so I can practice English.

Please let me know if I understand it.
Romany
Posted: Saturday, August 1, 2020 2:19:11 PM
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Joined: 6/14/2009
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Vipin - I think you must make it clear, when asking about "English" to define which kind of English you mean.

You see, in BE, and even, I suspect, in AE(?), this statement would be advised against - it sounds pompous and rather arrogant!

Whereas, in Indian English for example, which is much more formal, it is probably perfectly acceptable, and would not raise an eyebrow.

Many language schools now teach a mixture of AE & BE, with a few of the best-known of phrases/vocabulary from other English-speaking countries (though those are almost entirely European/Australasian based!) that are now part of what's called "International English."

I hope, desperately, that this hasn't dismayed you?Pray or made you think this is all too complicated? It's not - because in real life, or in enrolled courses, the students indicate WHY they want to learn English ("I'm a business-person who wants to engage with foreign markets." "I'm going to go to an American College next year.") and can choose the class that's best for them.

But in forums like this it's good to know so we don't misunderstand what answer to give. So while Tauto has attended only to the putting the words you supplied into order; I assure you that if a colleague/friend said those words to me ("I'll do it since I have the time." I'd probably say "Jeez! Don't bother!" and walk out the door!!)



Ashraful Haque Ashraf
Posted: Saturday, August 1, 2020 3:57:42 PM

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Joined: 11/5/2019
Posts: 76
Neurons: 3,543
[quote=Romany]
Vipin - I think you must make it clear, when asking about "English" to define which kind of English you mean.

You see, in BE, and even, I suspect, in AE(?), this statement would be advised against - it sounds pompous and rather arrogant!

Whereas, in Indian English for example, which is much more formal, it is probably perfectly acceptable, and would not raise an eyebrow.

Many language schools now teach a mixture of AE & BE, with a few of the best-known of phrases/vocabulary from other English-speaking countries (though those are almost entirely European/Australasian based!) that are now part of what's called "International English."

I hope, desperately, that this hasn't dismayed you?Pray or made you think this is all too complicated? It's not - because in real life, or in enrolled courses, the students indicate WHY they want to learn English ("I'm a business-person who wants to engage with foreign markets." "I'm going to go to an American College next year.") and can choose the class that's best for them.

But in forums like this it's good to know so we don't misunderstand what answer to give. So while Tauto has attended only to the putting the words you supplied into order; I assure you that if a colleague/friend said those words to me ("I'll do it since I have the time." I'd probably say "Jeez! Don't bother!" and walk out the door!!)

Thanks a lot for the answer. My reason to learn English is because I absolutely love the language specially because it lets me talk to people all over the world and I love to travel. So far I've traveled a few countries, Singapore, Malaysia and India(multiple times) and the country I'm going to next as soon as the virus goes away is Dubai. Each country has its own way of speaking English and I've chosen the one that's more accessible to me, which is the American style. By accessible I meant movies, shows etc.

Back to topic. What if I change the context:
1) Lets do the homework now since we have time.
2) Lets do the homework now since we have the time.

Would you please help me understand the difference?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, August 1, 2020 10:51:05 PM

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Joined: 9/12/2011
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I'll "jump in" here as I have the time . . . Whistle

To me, generally, they say basically the same thing, though obviously (as the grammar is different) they are not absolutely identical.

The first uses "time" as an uncountable idea - a general "concept".
It's "I/we have some time free, not doing anything else."
Lets do the homework now since we have time.

The second uses "time" as a countable noun - a specific period of time with a certain number of hours and minutes.
It's "We have the time needed to do it." or "We have the time needed to make some progress."
It doesn't necessarily mean "time enough to complete it" - though it often does mean that.
Lets do the homework now since we have the time.
In your "practice English" example, you will never FINISH practicing English, really, but you have "the time" - enough time to do a meaningful amount of practise.

So, as you can see, the two blue sentences both say "Now would be a good and convenient time to do the homework" - so the overall message is the same. The exact way of saying it is different.
Romany
Posted: Sunday, August 2, 2020 6:47:04 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 17,398
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Ah-hah! Thank you very much for answering...gives one a better chance of helping you.

American English is pretty informal, so "since I have the time" would be more likely to be expressed as "Now I've got the time", "Now I've got time," but, if you don't like using "got" "Now I have the time" "Now I have time" is also fine. Using the article is more habitual than rule-based i.e. some people use it and others don't, but it makes no difference to the meaning as Drago says.

"Since" usually refers back to a past event.

"Since the kids started school I have more time to myself."
"Since I've finished that report I've time to edit your thesis."
"Since I visited Vietnam I could eat Pho every day!"

Using "since" to mean "because" (Because I have the time, I'll help you.) is used in more formal writing, but isn't natural, casual speech.

(In case you're wondering why I'd "walk out the door" if someone used your original sentence? That's because it SOUNDS, to me, as if I'm being told "I'm only going to help you because I've nothing better to do." As if, in an ordinary, busy day, you wouldn't bother to help me! I wouldn't actually walk out - I may be a bit of a bolshy Brit - but I'm not a discourteous one!)

Good to meet someone who is as eager to experience life in different cultures and countries as am I. Do you stay in Hostels when you travel? That's a brilliant way to improve your English because most people will be speaking English (or trying to!)as the common language no matter where they are from. It can also be a lot of fun! After Dubai, have you ever thought of visiting Thailand? Apart from being such a magnificent country with rain forests, beaches, caves, rock formations...the Thai people themselves are so gently kind and friendly one never feels like a stranger! And the food is wonderful!!
sureshot
Posted: Sunday, August 2, 2020 7:03:12 AM
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Joined: 9/16/2015
Posts: 2,741
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Ashraful Haque Ashraf said:

Back to topic. What if I change the context:
1) Lets do the homework now since we have time.
2) Lets do the homework now since we have the time.

Would you please help me understand the difference?
___________________________

After going through all the previous posts, I tend to broadly agree with tautophile. His answer tends to answer Ashraful Haque Ashraf's doubt. Drag0nspeaker has also mentioned that "time", if used without "the" has a general "concept". It is a general term. When you say "Lets do the homework now since we have time", it implies a general availability of time with no other planned activity following it. The starting time of ensuing activity will not act as a hindrance to the commencement of the planned activity (= homework). It also gives the sense that this available time is adequate. If you say "...now since I have the time", you imply that time is available to do the activity before another activity that has some sort of a starting time. So, "the time" usually refers to the defined interval between two events. It need not be specified with reference to the clock time. The available time space before the start of the next activity can be gainfully utilized to perform the activity ("homework" in this case"). Sentence 2 implies "Let's do the homework now since we have the time (to do the task) before the next activity." "The time" is used to talk about a definite period of time duration. In the given sentence, one end of the time period is "now" and the other end is the start time of the next planned activity. The definite interval between these two events is indicated by using "the time". The use of "time" without "the" preceding it has a general recognition of the fact that there is no definite deadline to stop doing the homework in the immediate future.

Hope this clarifies your doubt.



FounDit
Posted: Sunday, August 2, 2020 10:13:30 PM

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Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 14,062
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Ashraful Haque Ashraf wrote:
tautophile wrote:
Yes. Both are correct, and differ only very slightly in meaning or emphasis. If you say "I'll do it, since I have time", you mean "I have enough free time in the fairly near future to start and complete the task". If you say "...since I have the time", you mean "I feel I have enough time in the immediate future--now, more or less--to start and complete the task." You can also say "I'll have [the] time to do it tomorrow", meaning that you don't have time today, but will have time tomorrow.


Thank you for the answer. From what I understand"
- Since I have time= I have free time.
- Since I have the time= I have enough time for the task. It says that I have enough time to finish this particular task. The emphasis is on the particular task.

If I say "I'll practice speaking English now since I have the (time to do it) time" it would means that I can finish practicing English in the time I have.

And if I say "I'll practice speaking English now since I have time" it would mean that I have some free time so I can practice English.

Please let me know if I understand it.


Yes, you understand it perfectly.
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