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Dubai
Posted: Sunday, May 17, 2020 4:19:33 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/16/2011
Posts: 391
Neurons: 31,241
Dear Forum members,May you kindly explain the following quotation in simple words,please.

"Come, fill the cup, and in the fire of Spring
Your Winter-garment of Repentance fling
The bird of time has a little way
To flutter - and the Bird is on the Wing"
thar
Posted: Sunday, May 17, 2020 5:50:11 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 21,983
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This is an English translation. It might help you to look at one in your native language if not in Persian!

But here goes, my ideas. Note these
1 - just refer to these lines in isolation, without wider context
and
2 - don't take into account the nuances of these ideas in Persian culture - that might already have been done by the translator, and the original may use different metaphors:

Come
come, start

fill the cup
have a drink, start to celebrate

and fling your winter-garment of repentance in the fire of spring

the season is changing - it is time to take of that winter cloak and throw it in the fire [the fire is like spring - it is spring and the sun is starting to burn more brightly]

your cloak of repentance is the bad feelings that weigh you down like thick clothing, and stop you from standing proud and facing the future


the bird of time has a little way to flutter
the time has almost come, but you have to wait a little longer. It has a little way to go.
Fate will take you to that point but it does not always move directly and swiftly (it flutters, like a young bird)


the bird is on the wing
It is flying, it is on its way to its destination


That is just my idea of what it means. Others may have different ideas and more context. But if you want to know what the 'experts' think, I am sure there are 'students' notes' on the poem in English available somewhere online.

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, May 17, 2020 6:13:51 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 33,933
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Khayyam, in most translations is a bit of a hedonist - he believes wine, food, women and pleasure are important, more important than religion. (There are some translations which don't have this 'bias'.)

I agree with thar's ideas.

"Come fill the cup" is very similar to the traditional English song "Come fill up your glasses and let us be merry".

He is comparing life to winters, springs and summers - miserable times and happy times.
TIME is the bird flying - there is only a little way to flutter - life is not long, and time is already flying.
Don't spend you life in winters - "throw off the winter clothes" - forget the unhappy moments.
Throw winter's cloak in the fire of Spring.
Spring is the end of sadness and the start of joy.

This is a different translation of another part of the poem with a similar message.

Quote:
In Spring time I love to sit in the meadow with a paramour
perfect as a Houri and goodly jar of wine, and though
I may be blamed for this, yet hold me lower
than a dog if ever I dream of Paradise.


He considers that sitting in the sun with a beautiful girl, drinking wine, is better than the promise of a future heaven.
Dubai
Posted: Sunday, May 17, 2020 7:16:37 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/16/2011
Posts: 391
Neurons: 31,241
Thank you so much.

I learned a lot of things because of this great forum.
Dubai
Posted: Tuesday, May 19, 2020 2:28:06 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/16/2011
Posts: 391
Neurons: 31,241
Thank you so much. You all are so cooperative and helpful.
tautophile
Posted: Monday, May 25, 2020 5:59:04 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/14/2018
Posts: 623
Neurons: 11,415
Dubai, the poem you quoted is a quatrain from Edward FitzGerald's famous translation (or rendering) of "The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam". The most famous of FitzGerald's quatrains from Omar is

A Book of Verses underneath the Bough,
A Jug of Wine, A Loaf of Brea--and Thou
Beside me singing in the Wilderness--
Oh, Wilderness were Paradise enow!

"Enow" is an old version of "enough". Omar was a Persian poet Ghiyath al-Din Abu'l-Fath Omar ibn Ibrahim Al-Nisaburi Khayyámi (1048 CE – 1131 CE).
Romany
Posted: Monday, May 25, 2020 6:17:14 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 17,074
Neurons: 54,679
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Tauto =

I prefer Fitzgerald's translation to any of the other's. He seems somehow to have captured the 'spirit' of the poet.

While it's undeniable, as Drago says, that the man was a hedonist - I have always seen him as a jolly soul whom one, in modern jargon, would probably call "mindful" as well - he so adores life! He savours every minute.

Yet, not knowing Persian, I've from time to time wondered If that's how the original sounds, or whether that is Fitzgerald himself?

(However, his attitudes and his philosophy have influenced me since I first 'met' him in my mother's bookshelves when I was 10.)
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