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Hitch your wagon to a star. Options
Daemon
Posted: Monday, April 8, 2019 12:00:00 AM
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Hitch your wagon to a star.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)
KSPavan
Posted: Monday, April 8, 2019 2:28:03 AM

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Quotation of the Day
?
Hitch your wagon to a star.
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)
Bully_rus
Posted: Monday, April 8, 2019 4:23:41 AM
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Daemon wrote:
Hitch your wagon to a star.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)


Yeah. For now, our wagon is hitched to some unknown black hole. And I feel it deep in my bones... Yeah, Monday.
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Monday, April 8, 2019 6:08:26 AM

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Location: Casablanca, Grand Casablanca, Morocco
Daemon wrote:
Hitch your wagon to a star.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Monday, April 8, 2019 6:11:54 AM

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Yes, and we should act to reach our destination.
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Monday, April 8, 2019 8:47:27 AM

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Hitch your wagon to a star.
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)
Verbatim
Posted: Monday, April 8, 2019 4:37:23 PM
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Joined: 10/3/2012
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Daemon wrote:
Hitch your wagon to a star.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)


...shooting over the sky afar.

monamagda
Posted: Monday, April 8, 2019 7:38:25 PM

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Joined: 2/4/2014
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Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia

Context from:The Complete Works. 1904.
Vol. VII. Society and Solitude:


II. Civilization

We had letters to send: couriers could not go fast enough nor far enough; broke their wagons, foundered their horses; bad roads in spring, snowdrifts in winter, heats in summer; could not get the horses out of a walk. But we found out that the air and earth were full of Electricity, and always going our way,—just the way we wanted to send. Would he take a message? Just as lief as not; had nothing else to do; would carry it in no time. Only one doubt occurred, one staggering objection,—he had no carpet-bag, no visible pockets, no hands, not so much as a mouth, to carry a letter. But after much thought and many experiments we managed to meet the conditions, and to fold up the letter in such invisible compact form as he could carry in those invisible pockets of his, never wrought by needle and thread,—and it went like a charm.

I admire still more than the saw-mill the skill which, on the seashore, makes the tides drive the wheels and grind corn, and which thus engages the assistance of the moon, like a hired hand, to grind, and wind, and pump, and saw, and split stone, and roll iron.

Now that is the wisdom of a man, in every instance of his labor, to hitch his wagon to a star, and see his chore done by the gods themselves. That is the way we are strong, by borrowing the might of the elements. The forces of steam, gravity, galvanism, light, magnets, wind, fire, serve us day by day and cost us nothing.

Our astronomy is full of examples of calling in the aid of these magnificent helpers. Thus, on a planet so small as ours, the want of an adequate base for astronomical measurements is early felt, as, for example, in detecting the parallax of a star. But the astronomer, having by an observation fixed the place of a star,—by so simple an expedient as waiting six months and then repeating his observation, contrived to put the diameter of the earth’s orbit, say two hundred millions of miles, between his first observation and his second, and this line afforded him a respectable base for his triangle.

All our arts aim to win this vantage. We cannot bring the heavenly powers to us, but if we will only choose our jobs in directions in which they travel, they will undertake them with the greatest pleasure. It is a peremptory rule with them that they never go out of their road. We are dapper little busybodies and run this way and that way superserviceably; but they swerve never from their foreordained paths,—neither the sun, nor the moon, nor a bubble of air, nor a mote of dust.

Read more:https://www.bartleby.com/90/0702.html


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