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Of course poets have morals and manners of their own, and custom is no argument with them. Options
Daemon
Posted: Sunday, February 10, 2019 12:00:00 AM
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Of course poets have morals and manners of their own, and custom is no argument with them.

Thomas Hardy (1840-1928)
KSPavan
Posted: Sunday, February 10, 2019 12:50:20 AM

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Quotation of the Day

Of course poets have morals and manners of their own, and custom is no argument with them.

Thomas Hardy (1840-1928)
Bully_rus
Posted: Sunday, February 10, 2019 1:05:44 AM
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Daemon wrote:
Of course poets have morals and manners of their own, and custom is no argument with them.

Thomas Hardy (1840-1928)


Yeah. Though I guess that only mere mortals don’t have morals and manners of their own...
Halit Arik
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Of course poets have morals and manners of their own, and custom is no argument with them
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Sunday, February 10, 2019 2:19:08 AM

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Daemon wrote:
Of course poets have morals and manners of their own, and custom is no argument with them.

Thomas Hardy (1840-1928)
monamagda
Posted: Sunday, February 10, 2019 4:30:20 AM

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Context from:VICTORIAN TRILOGY: Desperate Remedies, The Hand of Ethelberta & A Laodicean ...

2. Christopher's House - Sandbourne Town - Sandbourne Moor


'Was I? Then that was chiefly the reason. Well, I decided to think no more of her, and I was helped to do it by the troubles that came upon us shortly afterwards; it is a blessed arrangement that one does not feel a sentimental grief at all when additional grief comes in the shape of practical misfortune. However, on the first afternoon of the little holiday I took for my walking tour last summer, I came to Anglebury, and stayed about the neighbourhood for a day or two to see what it was like, thinking we might settle there if this place failed us. The next evening I left, and walked across the heath to Flychett--that's a village about five miles further on- -so as to be that distance on my way for next morning; and while I was crossing the heath there I met this very woman. We talked a little, because we couldn't help it--you may imagine the kind of talk it was--and parted as coolly as we had met. Now this strange book comes to me; and I have a strong conviction that she is the writer of it, for that poem sketches a similar scene--or rather suggests it; and the tone generally seems the kind of thing she would write--not that she was a sad woman, either.'

'She seems to be a warm-hearted, impulsive woman, to judge from these tender verses.'

'People who print very warm words have sometimes very cold manners. I wonder if it is really her writing, and if she has sent it to me!'

'Would it not be a singular thing for a married woman to do? Though of course'--(she removed her spectacles as if they hindered her from thinking, and hid them under the timepiece till she should go on reading)--'of course poets have morals and manners of their own, and custom is no argument with them. I am sure I would not have sent it to a man for the world!'

'I do not see any absolute harm in her sending it. Perhaps she thinks that, since it is all over, we may as well die friends.'

'If I were her husband I should have doubts about the dying. And "all over" may not be so plain to other people as it is to you.'

'Perhaps not. And when a man checks all a woman's finer sentiments towards him by marrying her, it is only natural that it should find a vent somewhere. However, she probably does not know of my downfall since father's death. I hardly think she would have cared to do it had she known that. (I am assuming that it is Ethelberta-- Mrs. Petherwin--who sends it: of course I am not sure.) We must remember that when I knew her I was a gentleman at ease, who had not the least notion that I should have to work for a living, and not only so, but should have first to invent a profession to work at out of my old tastes.'

Read more:https://www.classicreader.com/book/1552/3/

Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Sunday, February 10, 2019 10:00:13 AM

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Of course poets have morals and manners of their own, and custom is no argument with them.
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