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Morals are an acquirement, like music, like a foreign language, like piety, poker, paralysis, no man is born with them. Options
Daemon
Posted: Saturday, February 2, 2019 12:00:00 AM
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Morals are an acquirement, like music, like a foreign language, like piety, poker, paralysis, no man is born with them.

Mark Twain (1835-1910)
KSPavan
Posted: Saturday, February 2, 2019 2:16:04 AM

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Quotation of the Day

Morals are an acquirement, like music, like a foreign language, like piety, poker, paralysis, no man is born with them.

Mark Twain (1835-1910)
monamagda
Posted: Saturday, February 2, 2019 4:43:00 AM

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Context from: MARK TWAIN’S SPEECHES


SEVENTIETH BIRTHDAY


I have never taken any exercise, except sleeping and resting, and I never intend to take any. Exercise is loathsome. And it cannot be any benefit when you are tired; and I was always tired. But let another person try my way, and see where he will come out. I desire now to repeat and emphasise that maxim: We can’t reach old age by another man’s road. My habits protect my life, but they would assassinate you.

I have lived a severely moral life. But it would be a mistake for other people to try that, or for me to recommend it. Very few would succeed: you have to have a perfectly colossal stock of morals; and you can’t get them on a margin; you have to have the whole thing, and put them in your box. Morals are an acquirement—like music, like a foreign language, like piety, poker, paralysis—no man is born with them. I wasn’t myself, I started poor. I hadn’t a single moral. There is hardly a man in this house that is poorer than I was then. Yes, I started like that—the world before me, not a moral in the slot. Not even an insurance moral. I can remember the first one I ever got. I can remember the landscape, the weather, the—I can remember how everything looked. It was an old moral, an old second-hand moral, all out of repair, and didn’t fit, anyway. But if you are careful with a thing like that, and keep it in a dry place, and save it for processions, and Chautauquas, and World’s Fairs, and so on, and disinfect it now and then, and give it a fresh coat of whitewash once in a while, you will be surprised to see how well she will last and how long she will keep sweet, or at least inoffensive. When I got that mouldy old moral, she had stopped growing, because she hadn’t any exercise; but I worked her hard, I worked her Sundays and all. Under this cultivation she waxed in might and stature beyond belief, and served me well and was my pride and joy for sixty-three years; then she got to associating with insurance presidents, and lost flesh and character, and was a sorrow to look at and no longer competent for business. She was a great loss to me. Yet not all loss. I sold her—ah, pathetic skeleton, as she was—I sold her to Leopold, the pirate King of Belgium; he sold her to our Metropolitan Museum, and it was very glad to get her, for without a rag on, she stands 57 feet long and 16 feet high, and they think she’s a brontosaur. Well, she looks it. They believe it will take nineteen geological periods to breed her match.

Morals are of inestimable value, for every man is born crammed with sin microbes, and the only thing that can extirpate these sin microbes is morals. Now you take a sterilized Christian—I mean, you take the sterilized Christian, for there’s only one. Dear sir, I wish you wouldn’t look at me like that.

Threescore years and ten!

Rerad more : https://www.gutenberg.org/files/3188/3188-h/3188-h.htm#link2H_4_0096
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Saturday, February 2, 2019 5:40:44 AM

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Daemon wrote:
Morals are an acquirement, like music, like a foreign language, like piety, poker, paralysis, no man is born with them.

Mark Twain (1835-1910)
taurine
Posted: Saturday, February 2, 2019 7:20:52 AM

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I wish to propose other explanation leading to the understanding of what constitutes "morals". There are several words helpful in explaining what "morals" actually is.
The word Ἀγαθόν can be translated into English language as "good". Diogenes Laertius defines "good" in this fashion: the good is the perfection in accordance with nature of a rational being qua rational.
The word Ἀρετή can be translated into English language as "excellence", "virtue", "arete". Diogenes Laertius defines "arete" in the following manner: a harmonious disposition which is choice-worthy in itself, not because of any fear, hope, or any external thing. Diogenes Laertius also defines "virtue" as the best condition/state, or a condition/state out of which the very thing it is realized best, and which provides the appropriate activities in the best way. Referring to "excellence", the word Εὐκαιρίαν was used by Polybius for the purpose to describe 'favourable location, felicitous position' in the following sentence: "He marveled at the position of the city and the favourable location of its citadel, as regards both places beyond the Isthmus and those within the divide".
The word Ἡδοναί translated into English language as "pleasures" was used in the writings of the Cyrenaic philosophers, the followers of Aristippus in this way: "[P]articular pleasure is worth choosing by itself, but happiness is not worth choosing by itself but by particular pleasures".
The word Καθῆκόν translated into English language as "due action, what is appropriate". Zeno of Citium, the founder of the Stoic school, described a "due action" as one which when done has a reasonable justification. Diogenes Laertius cites it in this way as derived from Zeno.
The word Τέλος translated into English language may be understood as "end". I like the distinction made by Aristotle allegedly in de Anima, Physics, Metaphysics, Eudemian Ethics referring to the builder, namely: [F]or the builder the end as 'that for the sake of which' is to produce a covering preventative of rain and burning heat for us, for he produces such a covering for us.
The end in the sense of, used by Aristotle, "that for the sake of which" indicates the purpose for which something is done or produces in the specific context of art. Building may be described as an art.

In the result, in my opinion, comparison made by Mark Twain as to music, foreign language, poker, paralysis to name not all of them, is erroneous.


So pa la enferma
Bully_rus
Posted: Saturday, February 2, 2019 11:20:15 AM
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Daemon wrote:
Morals are an acquirement, like music, like a foreign language, like piety, poker, paralysis, no man is born with them.

Mark Twain (1835-1910)


Yeah. The good thing is that sooner or later all acquire morals. The only problem is how to make them compatible between themselves...
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Saturday, February 2, 2019 3:02:17 PM

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Morals are an acquirement, like music, like a foreign language, like piety, poker, paralysis, no man is born with them.
C185445
Posted: Saturday, February 2, 2019 5:27:12 PM

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This is why some cultures are simply incompatible... They have morals attached to their own social construct which cannot coexist with certain others...
mudbudda669
Posted: Saturday, February 2, 2019 9:46:59 PM

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Word
FounDit
Posted: Sunday, February 3, 2019 10:15:57 AM

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taurine's definitions are an excellent description of morals after one has wrung out all the humor of Twain.

I tend to agree with C185445. Each culture creates its own set of morals which are often incompatible with others. This is why Identity Politics must fail, as it destroys, rather than enhances, the culture that embraces it. Identity Politics is a bird that fouls its own nest.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
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