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Children have a natural antipathy to books--handicraft should be the basis of education. Boys and girls should be taught to... Options
Daemon
Posted: Saturday, December 15, 2018 12:00:00 AM
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Children have a natural antipathy to books--handicraft should be the basis of education. Boys and girls should be taught to use their hands to make something, and they would be less apt to destroy and be mischievous.

Oscar Wilde (1854-1900)
KSPavan
Posted: Saturday, December 15, 2018 1:22:15 AM

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Quotation of the Day

Children have a natural antipathy to books--handicraft should be the basis of education. Boys and girls should be taught to use their hands to make something, and they would be less apt to destroy and be mischievous.

Oscar Wilde (1854-1900)
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Saturday, December 15, 2018 3:59:09 AM

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It isn't as simple as that. Educating is a complex process. I would also add care, guidance, and encouragement.
Pieter_Hove
Posted: Saturday, December 15, 2018 8:39:41 AM

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Adyl Mouhei wrote:
It isn't as simple as that. Educating is a complex process. I would also add care, guidance, and encouragement.


Quotes are always a simplification of things, of course. I agree that education is complex. What Oscar Wilde is trying to say, I think, is: 'grow up in reason and handcraft'. What I would add, is: when you grow up, accept help from your tutors. And by the way: aren't we all busy with growing up, until we die?
monamagda
Posted: Saturday, December 15, 2018 9:52:55 AM

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Context from:IMPRESSIONS OF AMERICA.

Among the more elderly inhabitants of the South I found a melancholy tendency to date every event of importance by the late war. “How beautiful the moon is to-night,” I once remarked to a gentleman who was standing next to me. “Yes,” was his reply, “but you should have seen it before the war.”

So infinitesimal did I find the knowledge of Art, west of the Rocky Mountains, that an art patron—one who in his day had been a miner—actually sued the railroad company for damages because the plaster cast of Venus of Milo, which he had imported from Paris, had been delivered minus the arms. And, what is more surprising still, he gained his case and the damages.

Pennsylvania, with its rocky gorges and woodland scenery, reminded me of Switzerland. The prairie reminded me of a piece of blotting-paper.

The Spanish and French have left behind them memorials in the beauty of their names. All the cities that have beautiful names derive them from the Spanish or the French. The English people give intensely ugly names to places. One place had such an ugly name that I refused to lecture there. It was called Grigsville. Supposing I had founded a school of Art there—fancy “Early Grigsville.” Imagine a School of Art teaching “Grigsville Renaissance.”

As for slang I did not hear much of it, though a young lady who had changed her clothes after an afternoon dance did say that “after the heel kick she shifted her day goods.”

American youths are pale and precocious, or sallow and supercilious, but American girls are pretty and charming—little oases of pretty unreasonableness in a vast desert of practical common-sense.

Every American girl is entitled to have twelve young men devoted to her. They remain her slaves and she rules them with charming nonchalance.

The men are entirely given to business; they have, as they say, their brains in front of their heads. They are also exceedingly acceptive of new ideas. Their education is practical. We base the education of children entirely on books, but we must give a child a mind before we can instruct the mind. Children have a natural antipathy to books—handicraft should be the basis of education. Boys and girls should be taught to use their hands to make something, and they would be less apt to destroy and be mischievous.
In going to America one learns that poverty is not a necessary accompaniment to civilisation. There at any rate is a country that has no trappings, no pageants and no gorgeous ceremonies. I saw only two processions—one was the Fire Brigade preceded by the Police, the other was the Police preceded by the Fire Brigade.

Every man when he gets to the age of twenty-one is allowed a vote, and thereby immediately acquires his political education. The Americans are the best politically educated people in the world. It is well worth one’s while to go to a country which can teach us the beauty of the word FREEDOM and the value of the thing LIBERTY.


Read more: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/41806/41806-h/41806-h.htm

Bully_rus
Posted: Saturday, December 15, 2018 10:53:00 AM
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Daemon wrote:
Children have a natural antipathy to books--handicraft should be the basis of education. Boys and girls should be taught to use their hands to make something, and they would be less apt to destroy and be mischievous.

Oscar Wilde (1854-1900)


Yeah. It’s so true in the sense that the little things can make a big difference – at both ends of the scale.
FounDit
Posted: Saturday, December 15, 2018 2:45:18 PM

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I never had an antipathy to books. I loved to read when I was growing up. Books were the source of knowledge and wisdom.

They provided information, and with an abundance of those two things, a person is better able to evaluate the ideas that come along in daily life; which is precisely why there is an effort today to keep the young ignorant of wisdom.

They are provided a surfeit of information, but little in the way of knowledge and wisdom.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
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