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Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Monday, January 9, 2017 8:52:23 AM

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Joined: 8/3/2016
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Location: Jandiāla Guru, Punjab, India
That the Earth has giant Nuclear furnace?[img]http://cdn2.uk.mentalfloss.com/sites/mentalflossuk/files/2/75//earth-core.jpg[img]

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
will
Posted: Monday, January 9, 2017 11:29:33 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/29/2009
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Hi Ashwin Joshi
I'm enjoying the subjects you are offering for consideration, but could you consider using the subject matter as your title, instead of 'Do you know'. The same title with a different number added make it difficult to keep track of conversations. Thanks

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Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 12:25:27 PM

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Sir, man by nature is selfish. So, in order to leave an indeliable trail I wanted to start a series. I am ready to accept any suggestion , you may suggest for the same reason.

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 12:47:37 PM

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Joined: 8/3/2016
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Location: Jandiāla Guru, Punjab, India
Hi again!

I hope the following title, for example, will be fine.

Do you know that (subject).................

Ok?

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
leonAzul
Posted: Wednesday, January 11, 2017 11:11:01 PM

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Joined: 8/11/2011
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Location: Miami, Florida, United States
Do you know that citing such a source is amusing yet hopelessly ignorant?

Think

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Friday, January 13, 2017 11:59:17 AM

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Location: Jandiāla Guru, Punjab, India
Ignorant for whom? Questioner or answerer?

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
Epiphileon
Posted: Saturday, January 14, 2017 5:14:34 AM

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Ashwin Joshi wrote:
Ignorant for whom? Questioner or answerer?

Ignorance is the lack of knowledge concerning some subject. Claiming the Earth is a nuclear furnace demonstrates ignorance of geology.

Ignorance is not a bad thing as long as it is not willfully adhered to, and action, or belief, in any particular field is not predicated on it.

There are a number of different sciences that I am largely ignorant of, and some of the best fun I have is when I discover a source for understanding them that I can comprehend.

Question authority. How do you know, that you know, what you know?
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Saturday, January 14, 2017 11:51:41 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/3/2016
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Neurons: 72,530
Location: Jandiāla Guru, Punjab, India
My endeavor is toattract the science lovers towards hitherto unknown facts.

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
Epiphileon
Posted: Sunday, January 15, 2017 1:17:07 PM

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Joined: 3/22/2009
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Ashwin Joshi wrote:
My endeavor is toattract the science lovers towards hitherto unknown facts.


So are you maintaining the Earth is a nuclear furnace as fact?


Question authority. How do you know, that you know, what you know?
will
Posted: Monday, January 16, 2017 8:56:33 AM
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I say this tentatively, because I haven't got time to check right now...

I think there is some compelling research to suggest nuclear reactions at least plays some role within the Earth. But I don't remember if it was within the core, or any of the details.

It's surely fairer to assume Ashwin Joshi was just offering the idea for discussion, rather than making a statement of fact. Eh?


.
TMe
Posted: Wednesday, June 28, 2017 12:02:19 AM

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I am a layman.
Islami
Posted: Wednesday, June 27, 2018 10:15:45 AM
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Joined: 7/21/2017
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Geophysics: 97% of the Earth's mass is in the core/mantle which is on average ~ 8,000 degrees Fahrenheit. Why wouldn't such a massive furnace have FAR more effect on climate than the Sun 93MM miles away; or the injection of a comparatively miniscule amount of carbon into our 3% ecosystem?

The short answer is that rocks don't conduct heat very well and even though the centre of the Earth is hotter than the surface of the Sun, and much closer, the rate of heating from under our feet is very slow.





Just because the writer of an article is British doesn't mean that they use English correctly-DragOnspeaker.
Kampong
Posted: Monday, July 9, 2018 11:03:15 AM
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Joined: 9/30/2017
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Epiphileon wrote:
Ashwin Joshi wrote:
My endeavor is toattract the science lovers towards hitherto unknown facts.


So are you maintaining the Earth is a nuclear furnace as fact?

The processes that generate heat in the Earth are nuclear decay, and phase changes.
The contribution is mostly the nuclear part : ScientificAmerican, but calling it a nuclear furnace is putting too much emphasis on the source of energy, when so much energy is "bottled up" by the crust.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Monday, July 9, 2018 6:27:37 PM

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Yes what's happening within the Eatth to generate heat is similar to the affect used to power spacecraft such as the Voyager space probe.
Certain radioactive elements decay moving down thier decay series giving off various particles and energy as a by product.

It's not quite the image of a nuclear furnace as might be suggested by the Scientific American article.

Do you know about the Oklo region of Gabon where uranium became naturally enriched around 2 billion years ago to form a natural fission reactor.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_nuclear_fission_reactor

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, July 11, 2018 5:06:04 AM

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This type of natural fission reactor (including the periodically rising and falling pool) featured in "The Midas Legacy" by Andy McDermott.

Not a bad adventure - and the science was good (relying only on only one rather minor discovery which has not actually occurred - and probably never will).

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
thar
Posted: Wednesday, July 11, 2018 5:21:10 PM

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I like the topic of Earth's thermal history in general, because it is an object lesson in science. - Listen to the geologists! Just kidding. They did the same thing when it came to continental drift - listen to the meteorologist!

But it is why the early calculations on the age of the Earth were wrong.

The geologists were saying that under the principle of uniformitarianism (ie things happen in the same way throughout time) that the Earth must be very old, because currently things happen very slowly!

Kelvin got together all the information he could about thermal gradients, and rock melting points, and using thermodynamics he calculated the cooling rate to give the current state of the Earth from an initial molten state, and got a age of 100 million years. Minimum 20Ma, maximum 400Ma, the wide range because of the uncertainties in his data.

Since Kelvin was so respected, the geologists like Lyell had a hard time telling people the Earth must be much older than that. It also gave Darwin (who was convinved by the arguments of uniformitarian geologists) a bit of a problem to fit in time for all that evolution!

Quote:
Some of the great scientists, carefully ciphering the evidences furnished by geology, have arrived at the conviction that our world is prodigiously old, and they may be right but Lord Kelvin is not of their opinion. He takes the cautious, conservative view, in order to be on the safe side, and feels sure it is not so old as they think. As Lord Kelvin is the highest authority in science now living, I think we must yield to him and accept his views.

-Mark Twain, Letters from the Earth (Burchfield, ix)


Quote:
Kelvin was forced to respond and did so in an 1897 address. Based on new measurements of the melting point of rocks, Kelvin adjusted his estimate down to 20 million years. Based on this new data, he was increasingly confident and omitted the cautionary statements from his earlier works (121). Geikie, who had initially accepted Kelvin's 100 million year estimate because he believed geologic processes could complete their work within that timeframe, now turned on Kelvin when it became obvious that 20 million years was far insufficient and declared the independence of geologists from the autocratic pronouncements of the mathematical physicists like Kelvin and Tait (122).


Geologists 1 - Physicists 0

But that was before radioactivity was discovered - and that was the heart source he couldn't have accounted for. Especially the shorter lived isotopes like Aluminium-26. The unknown unknown. Whistle
All that original isotope has long since disappeared, because it has a half-life of less than a million years, but there is some constantly created from cosmic rays, so it is useful for dating how long surfaces have been exposed.Whistle

There was enough in early small solar system bodies to melt the interiors and allow differentiation, which is why you can get iron meteorites and stony meteorites, formed from the core and crust of those small bodies.

Nowadays the Earth is down to only the long-half-life isotopes such as Thorium-232 (10^10 years) and Potassium-40 (10^9 years) - but that early Earth was really rockin' it with the good stuff.

Just goes to show - you can do the best science, do all the detailed experiments, cover all the angles - but then something comes along and hits you, that you never even thought could exist. Got to keep an open mind.

Epiphileon
Posted: Thursday, July 12, 2018 3:20:29 AM

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Thanks Thar that was very informative. I was unaware that the Earth was thought to be so young, so recently, within science that is.

Question authority. How do you know, that you know, what you know?
Romany
Posted: Thursday, July 12, 2018 2:54:34 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
I always enjoy the ways Thar tells things. Simply, jargon-free...and so you don't feel like a dummy because you didn't know that before.

(I hadn't given any thought to the original isotopes disappearing. But then, truthfully, I hadn't given too much thought to the whole subject until I read Thar's post.)
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