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I would permit no man, no matter what his color might be, to narrow and degrade my soul by making me hate him. Options
Daemon
Posted: Monday, April 23, 2018 12:00:00 AM
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I would permit no man, no matter what his color might be, to narrow and degrade my soul by making me hate him.

Booker T. Washington (1856-1915)
KSPavan
Posted: Monday, April 23, 2018 3:22:39 AM

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Quotation of the Day

I would permit no man, no matter what his color might be, to narrow and degrade my soul by making me hate him.

Booker T. Washington (1856-1915)
zina antoaneta
Posted: Monday, April 23, 2018 6:23:31 AM

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Memorable quote! This is one power that they can't take away from us!
monamagda
Posted: Monday, April 23, 2018 7:43:54 AM

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Context from: Up From Slavery: An Autobiography

Chapter 11.

Making Their Beds Before They Could Lie On Them


It is now long ago that I learned this lesson from General Armstrong, and resolved that I would permit no man, no matter what his colour might be, to narrow and degrade my soul by making me hate him. With God's help, I believe that I have completely rid myself of any ill feeling toward the Southern white man for any wrong that he may have inflicted upon my race. I am made to feel just as happy now when I am rendering service to Southern white men as when the service is rendered to a member of my own race. I pity from the bottom of my heart any individual who is so unfortunate as to get into the habit of holding race prejudice.

The more I consider the subject, the more strongly I am convinced that the most harmful effect of the practice to which the people in certain sections of the South have felt themselves compelled to resort, in order to get rid of the force of the Negroes' ballot, is not wholly in the wrong done to the Negro, but in the permanent injury to the morals of the white man. The wrong to the Negro is temporary, but to the morals of the white man the injury is permanent. I have noted time and time again that when an individual perjures himself in order to break the force of the black man's ballot, he soon learns to practise dishonesty in other relations of life, not only where the Negro is concerned, but equally so where a white man is concerned. The white man who begins by cheating a Negro usually ends by cheating a white man. The white man who begins to break the law by lynching a Negro soon yields to the temptation to lynch a white man. All this, it seems to me, makes it important that the whole Nation lend a hand in trying to lift the burden of ignorance from the South.

Another thing that is becoming more apparent each year in the development of education in the South is the influence of General Armstrong's idea of education; and this not upon the blacks alone, but upon the whites also. At the present time there is almost no Southern state that is not putting forth efforts in the direction of securing industrial education for its white boys and girls, and in most cases it is easy to trace the history of these efforts back to General Armstrong.

Read more: http://www.literaturepage.com/read/upfromslavery-105.html



ibj_ldn
Posted: Monday, April 23, 2018 7:53:06 AM

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Another good man in the history of mankind...
ibj_ldn
Posted: Monday, April 23, 2018 7:59:05 AM

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Location: Londrina, Parana, Brazil
Other quotes by Booker T. Washington:

If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else.
Excellence is to do a common thing in an uncommon way.
Character, not circumstances, makes the man.
Associate yourself with people of good quality, for it is better to be alone than in bad company.
Bully_rus
Posted: Monday, April 23, 2018 2:19:24 PM
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Location: Minsk, Minskaya Voblasts', Belarus
Daemon wrote:
I would permit no man, no matter what his color might be, to narrow and degrade my soul by making me hate him.

Booker T. Washington (1856-1915)


Yeah. It is a big commitment, perhaps too big for one's boots...
Emel Rapchan
Posted: Monday, April 23, 2018 5:53:31 PM

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Location: Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil
I would permit no man, no matter what his color might be, to narrow and degrade my soul by making me hate him.
Booker T. Washington

- That is the essence of a fearful soul committed to living in peace on earth.
- Life is a rude experience for almost everyone. Live and survive in the society is a daunting experience that we are compelled to face since we are born. Sometimes, we can find relief or amusement, but, in general, we are endlessly dealing with forces that normally want us down or dead. Being someone who decides not feel hate is not only courageous but also bold.
monamagda
Posted: Tuesday, April 24, 2018 2:12:16 PM

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Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia

Context from:VANITY FAIR

Chapter LXVI

Amantium Irae


Frankness and kindness like Amelia's were likely to touch even such a hardened little reprobate as Becky. She returned Emmy's caresses and kind speeches with something very like gratitude, and an emotion which, if it was not lasting, for a moment was almost genuine. That was a lucky stroke of hers about the child "torn from her arms shrieking." It was by that harrowing misfortune that Becky had won her friend back, and it was one of the very first points, we may be certain, upon which our poor simple little Emmy began to talk to her new-found acquaintance.
"And so they took your darling child from you?" our simpleton cried out. "Oh, Rebecca, my poor dear suffering friend, I know what it is to lose a boy, and to feel for those who have lost one. But please Heaven yours will be restored to you, as a merciful merciful Providence has brought me back mine."
"The child, my child? Oh, yes, my agonies were frightful," Becky owned, not perhaps without a twinge of conscience. It jarred upon her to be obliged to commence instantly to tell lies in reply to so much confidence and simplicity. But that is the misfortune of beginning with this kind of forgery. When one fib becomes due as it were, you must forge another to take up the old acceptance; and so the stock of your lies in circulation inevitably multiplies, and the danger of detection increases every day.
"My agonies," Becky continued, "were terrible (I hope she won't sit down on the bottle) when they took him away from me; I thought I should die; but I fortunately had a brain fever, during which my doctor gave me up, and — and I recovered, and — and here I am, poor and friendless."
"How old is he?" Emmy asked.
"Eleven," said Becky.
"Eleven!" cried the other. "Why, he was born the same year with Georgy, who is — "
"I know, I know," Becky cried out, who had in fact quite forgotten all about little Rawdon's age. "Grief has made me forget so many things, dearest Amelia. I am very much changed: half-wild sometimes. He was eleven when they took him away from me. Bless his sweet face; I have never seen it again."
"Was he fair or dark?" went on that absurd little Emmy. "Show me his hair."
Becky almost laughed at her simplicity. "Not to-day, love — some other time, when my trunks arrive from Leipzig, whence I came to this place — and a little drawing of him, which I made in happy days."
"Poor Becky, poor Becky!" said Emmy. "How thankful, how thankful I ought to be"; (though I doubt whether that practice of piety inculcated upon us by our womankind in early youth, namely, to be thankful because we are better off than somebody else, be a very rational religious exercise) and then she began to think, as usual, how her son was the handsomest, the best, and the cleverest boy in the whole world.
"You will see my Georgy," was the best thing Emmy could think of to console Becky. If anything could make her comfortable that would.


Read more : http://www.victorianlondon.org/etexts/thackeray/vanity_fair-0066.shtml
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