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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner Options
Daemon
Posted: Monday, January 29, 2018 12:00:00 AM
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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner is a poem written by English poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Published in 1798, it represented a shift to modern poetry and heralded the beginning of English Romanticism. The poem opens with a mariner stopping a man on his way to a wedding and recounting to him the supernatural events he experienced during a long sea voyage. As the story progresses, the wedding guest's impatience fades and is replaced by fascination. What events may have inspired the poem? More...
KSPavan
Posted: Monday, January 29, 2018 5:20:42 AM

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Article of the Day
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner is a poem written by English poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Published in 1798, it represented a shift to modern poetry and heralded the beginning of English Romanticism. The poem opens with a mariner stopping a man on his way to a wedding and recounting to him the supernatural events he experienced during a long sea voyage. As the story progresses, the wedding guest's impatience fades and is replaced by fascination.
monamagda
Posted: Monday, January 29, 2018 4:55:54 PM

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Was the ‘ancient mariner’ real?
The ancient mariner didn’t exist but it’s likely that Coleridge was inspired by a conversation with fellow poet William Wordsworth, who had recently read George Shelvocke's A Voyage Round the World. Shelvocke writes of an incident when his second in command shot an albatross, which had been following the ship for several days. The ship, called the Speedwell, was later lost at Juan Fernandez Island.

Others say the poem was inspired by a dream that Coleridge's friend, George Cruikshank had after reading Thomas James's Strange and Dangerous Voyage. This account refers to an old man who had been shipwrecked and survives thanks to angels piloting the ship.

There’s also a theory that the old man who speaks at the start of the Rime of the Ancient Mariner may have been Fletcher Christian who led the mutiny onboard the HMS Bounty in 1789. Coleridge would have been aware of the rumours that Christian had faked his own death and returned to England – therefore the old man of the poem could well have been inspired by Christian.


Read more at https://www.rmg.co.uk/discover/explore/rime-ancient-mariner#zqUQYhCsT92QRRsz.99
Hope123
Posted: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 11:55:07 AM

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Thanks for all the research you do, Mona. I'm not much for poetry, but this one was always one of my favourites.

It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.
thar
Posted: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 12:17:51 PM

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I am sorry, but I can never see this title without thinking of a frosted sailor.

I like this poem - but it is hard to take it seriously when I can't get the 'rime' image out of my head!




Sometimes you can just be a bit too clever for your own good, Tenny-boy!

In Icelandic, the sound-alike is rím while frost is hrím
You can hear the difference! d'oh!
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