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I have heard men talk of the blessings of freedom, ... but I wish any wise man would teach me what use to make of it now that... Options
Daemon
Posted: Monday, January 22, 2018 12:00:00 AM
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I have heard men talk of the blessings of freedom, ... but I wish any wise man would teach me what use to make of it now that I have it.

Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832)
KSPavan
Posted: Monday, January 22, 2018 5:28:07 AM

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Quotation of the Day

I have heard men talk of the blessings of freedom, ... but I wish any wise man would teach me what use to make of it now that I have it.

Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832)
Emel Rapchan
Posted: Monday, January 22, 2018 6:56:00 AM

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Location: Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil
Freedom is a blessing thing that few people really know what to do with it.
It is a good point made by a person like Sir Walter Scott a playwriter and novelist that was the author of varies greats and remarkable pieces of work like Rob Roy, Ivanhoe, The Lady of the Lake, and many others.
thar
Posted: Monday, January 22, 2018 8:21:30 AM

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Joined: 7/8/2010
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From Ivanhoe

It is a specific circumstance, not a general philosophy.

Iwish tfd would understand the difference! d'oh! d'oh!

Quote:
Both the Saxon chiefs were made prisoners at the same moment, and each under circumstances expressive of his character. Cedric, the instant that an enemy appeared, launched at him his remaining javelin, which, taking better effect than that which he had hurled at Fangs, nailed the man against an oak-tree that happened to be close behind him. Thus far successful, Cedric spurred his horse against a second, drawing his sword at the same time, and striking with such inconsiderate fury, that his weapon encountered a thick branch which hung over him, and he was disarmed by the violence of his own blow. He was instantly made prisoner, and pulled from his horse by two or three of the banditti who crowded around him. Athelstane shared his captivity, his bridle having been seized, and he himself forcibly dismounted, long before he could draw his weapon, or assume any posture of effectual defence.

The attendants, embarrassed with baggage, surprised and terrified at the fate of their masters, fell an easy prey to the assailants; while the Lady Rowena, in the centre of the cavalcade, and the Jew and his daughter in the rear, experienced the same misfortune.

Of all the train none escaped except Wamba, who showed upon the occasion much more courage than those who pretended to greater sense. He possessed himself of a sword belonging to one of the domestics, who was just drawing it with a tardy and irresolute hand, laid it about him like a lion, drove back several who approached him, and made a brave though ineffectual attempt to succour his master. Finding himself overpowered, the Jester at length threw himself from his horse, plunged into the thicket, and, favoured by the general confusion, escaped from the scene of action. Yet the valiant Jester, as soon as he found himself safe, hesitated more than once whether he should not turn back and share the captivity of a master to whom he was sincerely attached.

“I have heard men talk of the blessings of freedom,” he said to himself, “but I wish any wise man would teach me what use to make of it now that I have it.”

As he pronounced these words aloud, a voice very near him called out in a low and cautious tone, “Wamba!” and, at the same time, a dog, which he recognised to be Fangs, jumped up and fawned upon him. “Gurth!” answered Wamba, with the same caution, and the swineherd immediately stood before him.

“What is the matter?” said he eagerly; “what mean these cries, and that clashing of swords?”

“Only a trick of the times,” said Wamba; “they are all prisoners.”

“Who are prisoners?” exclaimed Gurth, impatiently.

“My lord, and my lady, and Athelstane, and Hundibert, and Oswald.”

“In the name of God!” said Gurth, “how came they prisoners?—and to whom?”

“Our master was too ready to fight,” said the Jester; “and Athelstane was not ready enough, and no other person was ready at all. And they are prisoners to green cassocks, and black visors. And they lie all tumbled about on the green, like the crab-apples that you shake down to your swine. And I would laugh at it,” said the honest Jester, “if I could for weeping.” And he shed tears of unfeigned sorrow.

Gurth’s countenance kindled—“Wamba,” he said, “thou hast a weapon, and thy heart was ever stronger than thy brain,—we are only two—but a sudden attack from men of resolution will do much—follow me!”

“Whither?—and for what purpose?” said the Jester.

“To rescue Cedric.”

“But you have renounced his service but now,” said Wamba.

“That,” said Gurth, “was but while he was fortunate—follow me!”

As the Jester was about to obey, a third person suddenly made his appearance, and commanded them both to halt. From his dress and arms, Wamba would have conjectured him to be one of those outlaws who had just assailed his master; but, besides that he wore no mask, the glittering baldric across his shoulder, with the rich bugle-horn which it supported, as well as the calm and commanding expression of his voice and manner, made him, notwithstanding the twilight, recognise Locksley the yeoman, who had been victorious, under such disadvantageous circumstances, in the contest for the prize of archery.
Bully_rus
Posted: Monday, January 22, 2018 12:12:54 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/26/2013
Posts: 2,511
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Location: Minsk, Minskaya Voblasts', Belarus
Daemon wrote:
I have heard men talk of the blessings of freedom, ... but I wish any wise man would teach me what use to make of it now that I have it.

Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832)


Yeah. The cursings of freedom are more important than its blessings...
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