The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Kimitake Hiraoka, AKA Yukio Mishima (1925) Options
Daemon
Posted: Sunday, January 14, 2018 12:00:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/7/2009
Posts: 25,720
Neurons: 76,338
Location: Inside Farlex computers
Kimitake Hiraoka, AKA Yukio Mishima (1925)

Born into a samurai family, Mishima served briefly in the finance ministry before going on to become one of the most important Japanese novelists of the 20th century. His novels are known for their exquisite attention to detail and character and often involve paradoxes—such as when a troubled monk destroys the temple he loves in The Temple of the Golden Pavilion. Following a failed coup attempt in 1970, he tried to commit seppuku, ritual suicide by self-disembowelment. How did he die? More...
KSPavan
Posted: Sunday, January 14, 2018 6:17:59 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/28/2015
Posts: 4,519
Neurons: 2,692,186
Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India
Today's Birthday
Kimitake Hiraoka, AKA Yukio Mishima (1925)
Born into a samurai family, Mishima served briefly in the finance ministry before going on to become one of the most important Japanese novelists of the 20th century. His novels are known for their exquisite attention to detail and character and often involve paradoxes—such as when a troubled monk destroys the temple he loves in The Temple of the Golden Pavilion. Following a failed coup attempt in 1970, he tried to commit seppuku, ritual suicide by self-disembowelment.
monamagda
Posted: Sunday, January 14, 2018 8:02:16 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/4/2014
Posts: 6,725
Neurons: 4,699,820
Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia

The Tragic Life and Death of Yukio Mishima

Seppuku, often called ‘hari-kari’ in the west, is an excruciating way to die, even when done correctly. Though far too many western-made films depict it as a disgraced samurai simply impaling himself on his sword (and dying instantly), the correct way is to plunge the twenty-five centimeter long blade into one’s abdomen and begin cutting from right to left, with the aim of spilling one’s intestines. At a specified point another samurai, called the kaishakunin, will cut your head off – if they do it right, a sliver of flesh on the neck will remain so that the head can hang in front of the body.

The Tatenokai members accompanying Yukio didn’t exactly get his, or their own, seppuku right. Yukio did his part, cutting his stomach open, but his kaishakunin, Masakatsu Morita, failed to decapitate his leader after several attempts and passed his sword to another Tatenokai member, Hiroyasu Koga, who finished the job. Yukio would have been alive until the final blow. Morita stabbed himself in the stomach, and again, Koga, a skilled Kendo practitioner, stepped in to do his duty. It is rumoured that he now lives as a Shinto priest on the island of Shikoku.

It’s unclear whether his coup attempt was merely a pretext for a nobler suicide than he could have achieved at home with pills and vodka. It’s clear that the world lost a monumental

talent: in the moments before his death, he composed a jisei, a death poem:
“A small night storm blows
Saying ‘falling is the essence of a flower’
Preceding those who hesitate”


http://www.cvltnation.com/the-tragic-life-and-death-of-yukio-mishima/
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2008-2018 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.