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To admit authorities, however heavily furred and gowned, into our libraries and let them tell us how to read, what to read,... Options
Daemon
Posted: Friday, December 8, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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To admit authorities, however heavily furred and gowned, into our libraries and let them tell us how to read, what to read, what value to place upon what we read, is to destroy the spirit of freedom which is the breath of those sanctuaries. Everywhere else we may be bound by laws and conventions—there we have none.

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941)
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Friday, December 8, 2017 1:30:30 AM

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English novelist

with my pleasure
KSPavan
Posted: Friday, December 8, 2017 5:15:11 AM

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Quotation of the Day

To admit authorities, however heavily furred and gowned, into our libraries and let them tell us how to read, what to read, what value to place upon what we read, is to destroy the spirit of freedom which is the breath of those sanctuaries. Everywhere else we may be bound by laws and conventions—there we have none.

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941)
Dr. Handy
Posted: Friday, December 8, 2017 7:22:30 AM

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Our civil liberties are at war...with people who have no idea what it took to get those liberties...
mudbudda669
Posted: Friday, December 8, 2017 10:53:22 AM

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Word, Though I don't mind a little advice sometimes.
monamagda
Posted: Friday, December 8, 2017 1:03:50 PM

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Context from : The Common Reader, Second Series, by Virginia Woolf

How Should One Read a Book?

In the first place, I want to emphasise the note of interrogation at the end of my title. Even if I could answer the question for myself, the answer would apply only to me and not to you. The only advice, indeed, that one person can give another about reading is to take no advice, to follow your own instincts, to use your own reason, to come to your own conclusions. If this is agreed between us, then I feel at liberty to put forward a few ideas and suggestions because you will not allow them to fetter that independence which is the most important quality that a reader can possess. After all, what laws can be laid down about books? The battle of Waterloo was certainly fought on a certain day; but is Hamlet a better play than Lear? Nobody can say. Each must decide that question for himself. To admit authorities, however heavily furred and gowned, into our libraries and let them tell us how to read, what to read, what value to place upon what we read, is to destroy the spirit of freedom which is the breath of those sanctuaries. Everywhere else we may be bound by laws and conventions — there we have none.

But to enjoy freedom, if the platitude is pardonable, we have of course to control ourselves. We must not squander our powers, helplessly and ignorantly, squirting half the house in order to water a single rose-bush; we must train them, exactly and powerfully, here on the very spot. This, it may be, is one of the first difficulties that faces us in a library. What is “the very spot”? There may well seem to be nothing but a conglomeration and huddle of confusion. Poems and novels, histories and memoirs, dictionaries and blue-books; books written in all languages by men and women of all tempers, races, and ages jostle each other on the shelf. And outside the donkey brays, the women gossip at the pump, the colts gallop across the fields. Where are we to begin? How are we to bring order into this multitudinous chaos and so get the deepest and widest pleasure from what we read?

Read more:https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/w/woolf/virginia/w91c2/chapter22.html

Bully_rus
Posted: Friday, December 8, 2017 3:29:26 PM
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Daemon wrote:
To admit authorities, however heavily furred and gowned, into our libraries and let them tell us how to read, what to read, what value to place upon what we read, is to destroy the spirit of freedom which is the breath of those sanctuaries. Everywhere else we may be bound by laws and conventions—there we have none.

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941)


Yeah. They found the other way around to desecrate those sanctuaries and to destroy the spirit of freedom...
zina antoaneta
Posted: Friday, December 8, 2017 8:51:33 PM

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zina antoaneta
Posted: Friday, December 8, 2017 8:54:32 PM

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Wasn't Virginia Wolf aware of the big bad wolf, aka the THOUGHT police? After all, she drowned herself.
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