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As for a future life, every man must judge for himself between conflicting vague probabilities. Options
Daemon
Posted: Monday, November 20, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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As for a future life, every man must judge for himself between conflicting vague probabilities.

Charles Darwin (1809-1882)
Dubai
Posted: Monday, November 20, 2017 2:12:38 AM

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Dear Colleagues.

I do not understand the quotation.
May you kindly explain it.

Thank you so much for your always help.

A friend in need is a friend indeed.
Antonio Gallo
Posted: Monday, November 20, 2017 2:45:03 AM

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"Vague possibilities" means that you may or you may not live another life, it all depends on what you wish. If you think you can start all over again and do your past things better, you may hope for another life and do things better. But if you judge it's not worth, you won't have another chance ...
KSPavan
Posted: Monday, November 20, 2017 2:59:33 AM

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Quotation of the Day

As for a future life, every man must judge for himself between conflicting vague probabilities.

Charles Darwin (1809-1882)
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Monday, November 20, 2017 7:49:05 AM

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There can be no "future life" in the sense which we attach to the word. It is my personal judgement.
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Monday, November 20, 2017 11:50:57 AM

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English Naturalist

with my pleasure
Bully_rus
Posted: Monday, November 20, 2017 2:09:17 PM
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Daemon wrote:
As for a future life, every man must judge for himself between conflicting vague probabilities.

Charles Darwin (1809-1882)


The afterlife exists, just like afterglow, aftertaste or aftermath...
monamagda
Posted: Monday, November 20, 2017 3:48:03 PM

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Context from: The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin,

Volume I Page 133

DAY 97 OF 188


Nor can I overlook the difficulty from the immense amount of suffering through the world. I am, also, induced to defer to a certain extent to the judgment of the many able men who have fully believed in God; but here again I see how poor an argument this is. The safest conclusion seems to me that the whole subject is beyond the scope of man's intellect; but man can do his duty."

Again in 1879 he was applied to by a German student, in a similar manner. The letter was answered by a member of my father's family, who wrote:--

"Mr. Darwin begs me to say that he receives so many letters, that he cannot answer them all.

"He considers that the theory of Evolution is quite compatible with the belief in a God; but that you must remember that different persons have different definitions of what they mean by God."

This, however, did not satisfy the German youth, who again wrote to my father, and received from him the following reply:--

"I am much engaged, an old man, and out of health, and I cannot spare time to answer your questions fully,--nor indeed can they be answered. Science has nothing to do with Christ, except in so far as the habit of scientific research makes a man cautious in admitting evidence. For myself, I do not believe that there ever has been any revelation. As for a future life, every man must judge for himself between conflicting vague probabilities."

The passages which here follow are extracts, somewhat abbreviated, from a part of the Autobiography, written in 1876, in which my father gives the history of his religious views:--

"During these two years (October 1836 to January 1839.) I was led to think much about religion. Whilst on board the 'Beagle' I was quite orthodox, and I remember being heartily laughed at by several of the officers (though themselves orthodox) for quoting the Bible as an unanswerable authority on some point of morality. I suppose it was the novelty of the argument that amused them. But I had gradually come by this time, i.e. 1836 to 1839, to see that the Old Testament was no more to be trusted than the sacred books of the Hindoos. The question then continually rose before my mind and would not be banished,--is it credible that if God were now to make a revelation to the Hindoos, he would permit it to be connected with the belief in Vishnu, Siva, etc., as Christianity is connected with the Old Testament? This appeared to me utterly incredible.

"By further reflecting that the clearest evidence would be requisite to make any sane man believe in the miracles by which Christianity is supported,--and that the more we know of the fixed laws of nature the more incredible do miracles become,--that the men at that time were ignorant and credulous to a degree almost incomprehensible by us,--that the Gospels cannot be proved to have been written simultaneously with the events,--that they differ in many important details, far too important, as it seemed to me, to be admitted as the usual inaccuracies of eye-witnesses;--by such reflections as these, which I give not as having the least novelty or value, but as they influenced me, I gradually came to disbelieve in Christianity as a divine revelation. The fact that many false religions have spread over large portions of the earth like wild-fire had some weight with me.

"But I was very unwilling to give up my belief; I feel sure of this, for I can well remember often and often inventing day-dreams of old letters between distinguished Romans, and manuscripts being discovered at Pompeii or elsewhere, which confirmed in the most striking manner all that was written in the Gospels. But I found it more and more difficult, with free scope given to my imagination, to invent evidence which would suffice to convince me. Thus disbelief crept over me at a very slow rate, but was at last complete. The rate was so slow that I felt no distress.

"Although I did not think much about the existence of a personal God until a considerably later period of my life, I will here give the vague conclusions to which I have been driven.


http://charles-darwin.classic-literature.co.uk/the-life-and-letters-of-charles-darwin-volume-i/ebook-page-132.asp
Verbatim
Posted: Monday, November 20, 2017 10:09:29 PM
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Daemon wrote:
As for a future life, every man must judge for himself between conflicting vague probabilities.

Charles Darwin (1809-1882)


Not just "every man must judge for himself" but leave at that.
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