The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

The Persian Royal Road Options
Daemon
Posted: Saturday, November 18, 2017 12:00:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/7/2009
Posts: 22,255
Neurons: 66,768
Location: Inside Farlex computers
The Persian Royal Road

The Persian Royal Road was an ancient highway built by King Darius I in the 5th Century BCE to facilitate communication throughout his empire. The route, reconstructed using archeological research and historical records, passed through present day Turkey, Iraq, and Iran. The Greek historian Herodotus' praise for the speed of the Persian couriers, who were said to be able to travel the road's 1,677 miles (2,699 kilometers) in seven days, is popularly associated with what US public service? More...
KSPavan
Posted: Saturday, November 18, 2017 1:28:49 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/28/2015
Posts: 2,161
Neurons: 2,021,240
Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India
Article of the Day
The Persian Royal Road
The Persian Royal Road was an ancient highway built by King Darius I in the 5th Century BCE to facilitate communication throughout his empire. The route, reconstructed using archeological research and historical records, passed through present day Turkey, Iraq, and Iran.
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Saturday, November 18, 2017 7:59:52 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/27/2014
Posts: 1,797
Neurons: 910,428
Location: Tbilisi, T'bilisi, Georgia
Like Roman roads indeed. Serving to transfer troops over huge distances.
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Saturday, November 18, 2017 8:33:01 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/19/2017
Posts: 947
Neurons: 84,045
Location: Baghdad, Mayorality of Baghdad, Iraq
road built for Daruis

with my pleasure
monamagda
Posted: Saturday, November 18, 2017 12:34:22 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/4/2014
Posts: 5,802
Neurons: 3,779,977
Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia

Persian couriers were ancient mounted messengers (despatch riders) kept ready at regular stages throughout old Persia for carrying the royal despatches at the time of the Achaemenid Empire.

In Ancient Greek, Persian courier was called ἄγγαρος (ángaros, “Persian mounted courier”), whence Latin angarius, which is probably from an East Asian language (e.g., Sanskrit अजिरा (ajirā, “agile, swift”)). The word "angel" (ἄγγελος) is probably loaned from and related to Greek ἄγγαρος.

In about 440 BC, Herodotus wrote in The Histories (book 8.98)[3] about the Persian couriers:

“ Nothing mortal travels so fast as these Persian messengers. The entire plan is a Persian invention; and this is the method of it. Along the whole line of road there are men (they say) stationed with horses, in number equal to the number of days which the journey takes, allowing a man and horse to each day; and these men will not be hindered from accomplishing at their best speed the distance which they have to go, either by snow, rain, heat, or by the darkness of night. The first rider delivers his despatch to the second and the second passes it to the third; and so it is borne from hand to hand along the whole line, like the light in the torch-race, which the Greeks celebrate to Vulcan. The Persians give the riding post in this manner, the name of Angarum.[a] ”

Paraphrase of the Herodotus description was used by the United States Postal Service as a motto on the entrance to the Central Post Office building in New York City: "Neither snow, nor rain, nor heat, nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds.

https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persian_couriers

Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2017 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.