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If you can get nothing better out of the world, get a good dinner out of it, at least. Options
Daemon
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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If you can get nothing better out of the world, get a good dinner out of it, at least.

Herman Melville (1819-1891)
KSPavan
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 12:12:18 AM

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Quotation of the Day

If you can get nothing better out of the world, get a good dinner out of it, at least.

Herman Melville (1819-1891)
pedro
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 7:08:55 AM

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or an echo at least

All good ideas arrive by chance- Max Ernst
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 8:29:46 AM

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The quotation is not from Mobey Dick, as far as I can remember the novel.
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 8:33:24 AM

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American author born in America

with my pleasure
monamagda
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 12:52:37 PM

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Context from : Moby-Dick. 1922.

Chapter CI
The Decanter


During my researches in the leviathanic histories, I stumbled upon an ancient Dutch volume, which, by the musty whaling smell of it, I knew must be about whalers. The title was Dan Coopman, wherefore I concluded that this must be the invaluable memoirs of some Amsterdam cooper in the fishery, as every whale-ship must carry its cooper. I was reinforced in this opinion by seeing that it was the production of one ‘Fitz Swackhammer.’ But my friend Dr. Snodhead, a very learned man, professor of Low Dutch and High German in the college of Santa Claus and St. Pott’s, to whom I handed the work for translation, giving him a box of sperm candles for his trouble—this same Dr. Snodhead, so soon as he spied the book, assured me that Dan Coopman did not mean ‘The Cooper,’ but ‘The Merchant.’ In short, this ancient and learned Low Dutch book treated of the commerce of Holland; and, among other subjects, contained a very interesting account of its whale-fishery. And in this chapter it was, headed ‘Smeer,’ or ‘Fat,’ that I found a long detailed list of the outfits for the larders and cellars of 180 sail of Dutch whalemen; from which list, as translated by Dr. Snodhead, I transcribe the following:—
400,000 lbs. of beef.
60,000 lbs. Friesland pork.
150,000 lbs. of stock fish.
550,000 lbs. of biscuit.
72,000 lbs. of soft bread.
2,800 firkins of butter.
20,000 lbs. Texel & Leyden cheese.
144,000 lbs. cheese (probably an inferior article).
550 ankers of Geneva.
10,800 barrels of beer.

Most statistical tables are parchingly dry in the reading; not so in the present case, however, where the reader is flooded with whole pipes, barrels, quarts, and gills of good gin and good cheer.
At the time, I devoted three days to the studious digesting of all this beer, beef, and bread, during which many profound thoughts were incidentally suggested to me, capable of a transcendental and Platonic application; and, furthermore, I compiled supplementary tables of my own, touching the probable quantity of stock-fish, etc., consumed by every Low Dutch harpooneer in that ancient Greenland and Spitzbergen whale-fishery. In the first place, the amount of butter, and Texel and Leyden cheese consumed, seems amazing. I impute it, though, to their naturally unctuous natures, being rendered still more unctuous by the nature of their vocation, and especially by their pursuing their game in those frigid Polar seas, on the very coasts of that Esquimaux country where the convivial natives pledge each other in bumpers of train oil.

The quantity of beer, too, is very large, 10,800 barrels. Now, as those Polar fisheries could only be prosecuted in the short summer of that climate, so that the whole cruise of one of these Dutch whalemen, including the short voyage to and from the Spitzbergen sea, did not much exceed three months, say, and reckoning 30 men to each of their fleet of 180 sail, we have 5400 Low Dutch seamen in all; therefore, I say, we have precisely two barrels of beer per man, for a twelve weeks’ allowance, exclusive of his fair proportion of that 550 ankers of gin. Now, whether these gin and beer harpooneers, so fuddled as one might fancy them to have been, were the right sort of men to stand up in a boat’s head, and take good aim at flying whales; this would seem somewhat improbable. Yet they did aim at them, and hit them too. But this was very far north, be it remembered, where beer agrees well with the constitution; upon the Equator, in our Southern fishery, beer would be apt to make the harpooneer sleepy at the mast-head and boozy in his boat; and grievous loss might ensue to Nantucket and New Bedford.

The quantity of beer, too, is very large, 10,800 barrels. Now, as those Polar fisheries could only be prosecuted in the short summer of that climate, so that the whole cruise of one of these Dutch whalemen, including the short voyage to and from the Spitzbergen sea, did not much exceed three months, say, and reckoning 30 men to each of their fleet of 180 sail, we have 5400 Low Dutch seamen in all; therefore, I say, we have precisely two barrels of beer per man, for a twelve weeks’ allowance, exclusive of his fair proportion of that 550 ankers of gin. Now, whether these gin and beer harpooneers, so fuddled as one might fancy them to have been, were the right sort of men to stand up in a boat’s head, and take good aim at flying whales; this would seem somewhat improbable. Yet they did aim at them, and hit them too. But this was very far north, be it remembered, where beer agrees well with the constitution; upon the Equator, in our Southern fishery, beer would be apt to make the harpooneer sleepy at the mast-head and boozy in his boat; and grievous loss might ensue to Nantucket and New Bedford. 11
But no more; enough has been said to show that the old Dutch whalers of two or three centuries ago were high livers; and that the English whalers have not neglected so excellent an example. For, say they, when cruising in an empty ship, if you can get nothing better out of the world, get a good dinner out of it, at least. And this empties the decanter.

Read more : http://www.bartleby.com/91/101.html
Bully_rus
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 1:25:00 PM
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Joined: 3/26/2013
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Location: Minsk, Minskaya Voblasts', Belarus
Daemon wrote:
If you can get nothing better out of the world, get a good dinner out of it, at least.

Herman Melville (1819-1891)


Yeah. At least, it can help you get by till better times and then you can try again...
Verbatim
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 2:12:22 PM
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Red Buttons "Never Got a Dinner", never mind a good dinner, until he roasted some fellows for it.
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