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My dreams were at once more fantastic and agreeable than my writings. Options
Daemon
Posted: Friday, November 03, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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My dreams were at once more fantastic and agreeable than my writings.

Mary Shelley (1797-1851)
KSPavan
Posted: Friday, November 03, 2017 1:56:47 AM

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Quotation of the Day

My dreams were at once more fantastic and agreeable than my writings.

Mary Shelley (1797-1851)
KSPavan
Posted: Friday, November 03, 2017 1:56:47 AM

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Quotation of the Day

My dreams were at once more fantastic and agreeable than my writings.

Mary Shelley (1797-1851)
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Friday, November 03, 2017 3:13:14 AM

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Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft, 1797–1851, English author; daughter of William Godwin

and Mary Wollstonecraft

. In 1814 she fell in love with the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley

, accompanied him abroad, and after the death of his first wife in 1816 was married to him. Her most notable contribution to literature is her novel of terror, Frankenstein, published in 1818. It is the story of a German student who learns the secret of infusing life into inanimate matter and creates a monster that ultimately destroys him. Included among her other novels are Valperga (1823), The Last Man (1826), and the partly autobiographical Lodore (1835). After Shelley's death in 1822, she devoted herself to caring for her aged father and educating her only surviving child, Percy Florence Shelley. In 1839–40 she edited her husband's works.
Bibliography

See her journal (ed. by F. L. Jones, 1947); her letters (ed. by M. Spark and D. Stamford, 1953); biographies by M. Spark (1951, repr. 1988), N. B. Gerson (1973), and M. Seymour (2001); C. Gordon, Romantic Outlaws: The Extraordinary Lives of Mary Wollstonecraft and Her Daughter Mary Shelley (2015); studies by W. A. Walling (1972), E. Sunstein (1989), and R. Montillo (2013).
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.
Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft

Born Aug. 30, 1797, in London; died there Feb. 1, 1851. English writer. Daughter of W. Godwin; wife of P. B. Shelley.

The hero of Shelley’s novel Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus (1818; Russian translation, 1965) creates a monster that tries to do good, but, embittered by loneliness, kills its creator. A gloomy picture of the coming downfall of mankind through epidemics and starvation is at the center of her novel The Last Man (1826). Shelley also wrote the autobiographical novel Lodore (1835) and commentaries to a posthumous edition of works by P. B. Shelley (1839).
WORKS
The Letters of Mary Shelley, vols. 1–2. Norman, Okla., 1944–46.
Mary Shelley’s Journal. Norman, Okla., 1947.
REFERENCES
Bel’skii, A. A. Angliiskii roman 1800–1810-x gg. Perm’, 1968.
Spark, M. Child of Light. Hadleigh, Essex, 1951.
Small, C. Ariel Like a Harpy. London, 1972.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.


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with my pleasure
Bully_rus
Posted: Friday, November 03, 2017 11:57:37 AM
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Daemon wrote:
My dreams were at once more fantastic and agreeable than my writings.

Mary Shelley (1797-1851)


Yeah. Dreams can't last for much too long, however fantastic and agreeable they are...
Bully_rus
Posted: Friday, November 03, 2017 11:57:38 AM
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Yeah. They must be, because otherwise they would be misplaced...
thar
Posted: Friday, November 03, 2017 3:34:30 PM

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Any learners - this is the old meaning of 'fantastic', as in a fantasy, not reality. Something fantastic need not be good. It can be a dystopian fantasy - it can be horrible - the point is that it is imagined, not realistic.
As in Frankenstein's creature.


Not the modern meaning of fantastic - 'excellent'.


'At once' means there is a contrast between the two ideas - more wildly unrealistic and yet still nicer.
Ie fantastic is expected to be the opposite of agreeable.
Victor Rivas Vicente
Posted: Friday, November 03, 2017 7:42:41 PM

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This particular phrase "My dreams were at once more fantastic and agreeable than my writings." comes from Mary Shelley´s intro to the 1831 edition of "Frankenstein", aimed to explain how she came up with that story.

The entire paragraph where it appears is as follows:

"It is not singular that, as the daughter of two persons of distinguished literary celebrity, I should very early in life have thought of writing. As a child I scribbled; and my favourite pastime, during the hours given me for recreation, was to "write stories." Still I had a dearer pleasure than this, which was the formation of castles in the air—the indulging in waking dreams—the following up trains of thought, which had for their subject the formation of a succession of imaginary incidents. My dreams were at once more fantastic and agreeable than my writings. In the latter I was a close imitator—rather doing as others had done, than putting down the suggestions of my own mind. What I wrote was intended at least for one other eye—my childhood's companion and friend; but my dreams were all my own; I accounted for them to nobody; they were my refuge when annoyed—my dearest pleasure when free."

It wasn't very hard to find the source, but still it required some going through uninformative stuff...
And I wonder if it would be possible to publish with each quote the exact source where it comes from, instead of just the author's name linked to their bio...
Verbatim
Posted: Friday, November 03, 2017 10:11:45 PM
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Daemon wrote:
My dreams were at once more fantastic and agreeable than my writings.

Mary Shelley (1797-1851)


Her dreams being at the same time more fantastic and agreeable than her writings, knowing only her phantasmagoric writing,
leaves us wondering about the dichotomy.
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