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The Kalash Options
Daemon
Posted: Thursday, November 02, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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The Kalash

Approximately 3,000 members of the Kalash people currently inhabit the isolated mountain valleys of the North-West Frontier Province of Pakistan. The Kalash belief system differs drastically from those of surrounding ethnic groups and is said to be the last untouched representative of Indo-European mythology. Genetic testing has indicated that the Kalash are a distinct and perhaps aboriginal population. What is unique about their language? More...
KSPavan
Posted: Thursday, November 02, 2017 1:42:42 AM

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Article of the Day
The Kalash
Approximately 3,000 members of the Kalash people currently inhabit the isolated mountain valleys of the North-West Frontier Province of Pakistan. The Kalash belief system differs drastically from those of surrounding ethnic groups and is said to be the last untouched representative of Indo-European mythology. Genetic testing has indicated that the Kalash are a distinct and perhaps aboriginal population.
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Thursday, November 02, 2017 2:50:36 AM

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Joined: 4/19/2017
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Location: Baghdad, Mayorality of Baghdad, Iraq
Present Continuous Tense (Progressive)
What is the present continuous tense?
We create the present continuous tense by using the present participle (-ing form) of the verb after the present-tense form of the auxiliary verb be (which conjugates as is, am, or are).
Unlike the present simple tense, which is used to express things that are always the case or are at a fixed time in the future, we use the present continuous (also called the present progressive) tense to speak about actions that are currently happening, whether generally or at the exact moment of speech. It can also be used to describe actions or events that are planned for the future (but are not definitively fixed in time, such as a timetable).
Actions happening at the moment of speech
The most common occurrence of the present continuous is when someone or something is performing an action at the very moment being described. In this case, the object of the verb is usually in the presence of or very near to the speaker. For example:

“I am going home now.”
“He is crying because of the movie.”
“We are heading to the park.”
“It is raining outside.”

Actions happening currently, but not at the moment of speech
The present continuous can also indicate something that is currently happening but which is not at the exact moment of speech. It generally refers to something that the person or thing is currently engaged in doing that is taking place continuously over a longer period of time, but which is not (necessarily) permanent. For example:

“John is working in telemarketing.”
“She is running for president.”
“I am living in London.”

Actions or events planned for the future
Like the present simple tense, the present continuous can also describe future events. However, unlike the present simple, it describes that which someone is planning or expecting to do, as opposed to that which is at a fixed point in time in the future. The formation of the verb does not change to reflect this; rather, information from the rest of the sentence informs the future intention.

“She is running for president next year.”
“I am taking my driving test after the Christmas break.”
“We are watching a movie later.”

With adverbs
We can also add adverbs relating to time between be and the present participle to specify or clarify when or how frequently something happens or occurs.

“I am already leaving.” (I am leaving sooner than I expected.)
“She is still living next door.” (She continues to live next door, perhaps longer than was expected.)

The adverb always
There is also a special usage when the adverb always is used between be and the present participle. Rather than literally meaning that the action always happens (as you might expect), it instead means that that action very often happens. We use this as a means of adding hyperbolic emphasis to how frequently something happens or occurs, and it usually implies that the action or event is questionable, irritating, or undesirable to some degree. For example:

“My husband is always leaving dirty dishes in the sink!”
“The used car I bought is always breaking down.”
“You are always losing your phone!”

Negative sentences
A negative sentence in the present continuous describes what is not currently happening. We form these by adding the word not after the auxiliary verb be. For second-person, third-person, and first-person plural (but not first-person singular), be and not can also be contracted.
For example:

“I am not watching the movie.”
“He is not crying.”
“You aren’t leaving until the house is clean.”
“She isn’t going home for Thanksgiving this year.”

with my pleasure
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Thursday, November 02, 2017 9:20:38 AM

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Location: Tbilisi, T'bilisi, Georgia
They look pretty much Caucasian. Must be a remnant Indo-Aryan tribe indeed.
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