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Henry VII Is Crowned King of England (1485) Options
Daemon
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Henry VII Is Crowned King of England (1485)

As a noble from the House of Lancaster, Henry fled England when the rival House of York triumphed in 1471. He later returned, rallied his supporters, and defeated Richard III in 1485. He then married Elizabeth of York and ended the Wars of the Roses between the two houses. Plots against him persisted, and two years later, Yorkists rebelled in support of Lambert Simnel, a boy they claimed was the Earl of Warwick. The rebellion was crushed by Henry's forces. What did Henry do with young Lambert? More...
KSPavan
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This Day in History
Henry VII Is Crowned King of England (1485)
As a noble from the House of Lancaster, Henry fled England when the rival House of York triumphed in 1471. He later returned, rallied his supporters, and defeated Richard III in 1485. He then married Elizabeth of York and ended the Wars of the Roses between the two houses. Plots against him persisted, and two years later, Yorkists rebelled in support of Lambert Simnel, a boy they claimed was the Earl of Warwick. The rebellion was crushed by Henry's forces.
raghd muhi al-deen
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Henry VII of England
Henry VII of England
Henry VII
King Henry VII.jpg
Portrait of King Henry VII holding a Tudor Rose, wearing collar of the Order of the Golden Fleece, dated 1505, by unknown artist, National Portrait Gallery, London (NPG 416).
King of England (more...)
Reign 22 August 1485 – 21 April 1509
Coronation 30 October 1485
Predecessor Richard III
Successor Henry VIII
Spouse Elizabeth of York
Issue
Arthur, Prince of Wales
Margaret, Queen of Scots
Henry VIII of England
Elizabeth Tudor
Mary, Queen of France
Edmund Tudor, Duke of Somerset
Katherine Tudor
House House of Tudor
Father Edmund Tudor, 1st Earl of Richmond
Mother Lady Margaret Beaufort
Born 28 January 1457
Pembroke Castle, Wales
Died 21 April 1509 (aged 52)
Richmond Palace, England
Burial Westminster Abbey, London
Signature
English Royalty
House of Tudor
Coat of Arms of Henry VII of England (1485-1509).svg
Royal Coat of Arms
Henry VII
Arthur, Prince of Wales
Margaret, Queen of Scots
Henry VIII
Mary, Queen of France

Henry VII (Welsh: Harri Tudur; 28 January 1457 – 21 April 1509) was King of England and Lord of Ireland from his seizing the crown on 22 August 1485 until his death on 21 April 1509, as the first monarch of the House of Tudor.

Henry won the throne when his forces defeated Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth Field. He was the last king of England to win his throne on the field of battle. Henry cemented his claim by marrying Elizabeth of York, daughter of Edward IV and niece of Richard III. Henry was successful in restoring the power and stability of the English monarchy after the political upheavals of the civil wars known as the Wars of the Roses. He founded the Tudor dynasty and, after a reign of nearly 24 years, was peacefully succeeded by his son, Henry VIII.

Although Henry can be credited with the restoration of political stability in England, and a number of commendable administrative, economic and diplomatic initiatives, the latter part of his reign was characterised by a financial rapacity which stretched the bounds of legality. The capriciousness and lack of due process which indebted many in England were soon ended upon Henry VII's death after a commission revealed widespread abuses.[1] According to the contemporary historian Polydore Vergil, simple "greed" in large part underscored the means by which royal control was over-asserted in Henry's final years.[2]
Ancestry and early life
Young Henry VII, by a French artist (Musée Calvet, Avignon)

Henry VII was born at Pembroke Castle on 28 January 1457 to the 13-year-old Margaret Beaufort, Countess of Richmond. His father, Edmund Tudor, 1st Earl of Richmond, died three months before his birth.[3]

Henry's paternal grandfather, Owen Tudor, originally from the Tudors of Penmynydd, Isle of Anglesey in Wales, had been a page in the court of Henry V. He rose to become one of the "Squires to the Body to the King" after military service at Agincourt.[4] Owen is said to have secretly married the widow of Henry V, Catherine of Valois. One of their sons was Edmund Tudor, father of Henry VII. Edmund was created Earl of Richmond in 1452, and "formally declared legitimate by Parliament".[5]

Henry's main claim to the English throne derived from his mother through the House of Beaufort. Henry's mother, Lady Margaret Beaufort, was a great-granddaughter of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, fourth son of Edward III, and his third wife Katherine Swynford. Katherine was Gaunt's mistress for about 25 years; when they married in 1396, they already had four children, including Henry's great-grandfather John Beaufort. Thus Henry's claim was somewhat tenuous: it was from a woman, and by illegitimate descent. In theory, the Portuguese and Spanish royal families had a better claim (as far as "legitimacy" is concerned)[citation needed] as descendants of Catherine of Lancaster, the daughter of John of Gaunt and his second wife Constance of Castile.
Groat of Henry VII

Gaunt's nephew Richard II legitimised Gaunt's children by Katherine Swynford by Letters Patent in 1397. In 1407, Henry IV, who was Gaunt's son by his first wife, issued new Letters Patent confirming the legitimacy of his half-siblings, but also declaring them ineligible for the throne.[6] Henry IV's action was of doubtful legality, as the Beauforts were previously legitimised by an Act of Parliament, but it further weakened Henry's claim.

Nonetheless, by 1483 Henry was the senior male Lancastrian claimant remaining, after the deaths in battle or by murder or execution of Henry VI, his son Edward of Westminster, Prince of Wales, and the other Beaufort line of descent through Lady Margaret's uncle, the 2nd Duke of Somerset.

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monamagda
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In June 1487, Simnel landed in Lancashire, supported by 2,000 German mercenaries provided by Edward IV’s sister Margaret, duchess of Burgundy, and in company with a genuine Yorkist claimant, John de la Pole, earl of Lincoln, who had abandoned his temporary loyalty to the Tudors. The issue was settled in the Battle of Stoke (June 1487); Lincoln was killed, Simnel and Symonds were taken, the other Yorkist leaders disappeared. Symonds was kept in prison, but Henry VII displayed only sardonic contempt for Simnel, whom he recognized to have been a harmless dupe. Employed in the royal kitchens, the pretender made a modest career for himself, dying soon after 1534.


https://www.britannica.com/biography/Lambert-Simnel-English-pretender
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