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Evelyn Waugh (1903) Options
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Evelyn Waugh (1903)

Waugh was an English novelist who is widely considered the greatest satirist of his generation. His novels, characterized by sardonic wit, technical brilliance, and his devoted Catholicism, include A Handful of Dust and Brideshead Revisited. Waugh also wrote amusing travel books. After service in World War II, he led a retired life, and his writing grew increasingly misanthropic. In 1925, Waugh's suicide attempt was thwarted when he was coincidentally attacked by what animal? More...
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Evelyn Waugh (1903)
Waugh was an English novelist who is widely considered the greatest satirist of his generation. His novels, characterized by sardonic wit, technical brilliance, and his devoted Catholicism, include A Handful of Dust and Brideshead Revisited. Waugh also wrote amusing travel books. After service in World War II, he led a retired life, and his writing grew increasingly misanthropic.
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Evelyn Waugh
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Evelyn Waugh
Evelyn Waugh
Evelynwaugh.jpeg
Evelyn Waugh, photographed in about 1940
Born 28 October 1903
London, United Kingdom
Died 10 April 1966 (aged 62)
Combe Florey, Somerset, United Kingdom
Occupation Writer
Nationality British
Education Lancing College, Hertford College, Oxford
Period 1923–64
Genres Novel, biography, short story, travel writing, autobiography, satire, humour
Spouse(s) (1) 1929 Evelyn Gardner (divorced 1930, annulled 1936)
(2) 1937 Laura Herbert
Children Four daughters (one died in infancy); three sons

Arthur Evelyn St. John Waugh (/ˈɑːθə ˈiːvlɪn ˈsɪndʒən wɔː/; 28 October 1903 – 10 April 1966), known as Evelyn Waugh, was an English writer of novels, biographies and travel books. He was also a prolific journalist and reviewer. His best-known works include his early satires Decline and Fall (1928) and A Handful of Dust (1934), his novel Brideshead Revisited (1945) and his trilogy of Second World War novels collectively known as Sword of Honour (1952–61). Waugh is widely recognised as one of the great prose stylists of the 20th century.

The son of a publisher, Waugh was educated at Lancing and Hertford College, Oxford, and worked briefly as a schoolmaster before becoming a full-time writer. As a young man, he acquired many fashionable and aristocratic friends, and developed a taste for country house society that never left him. In the 1930s he travelled extensively, often as a special newspaper correspondent; he was reporting from Abyssinia at the time of the 1935 Italian invasion. He served in the British armed forces throughout the Second World War, first in the Royal Marines and later in the Royal Horse Guards. All these experiences, and the wide range of people he encountered, were used in Waugh's fiction, generally to humorous effect; even his own mental breakdown in the early 1950s, brought about by misuse of drugs, was fictionalised.

Waugh had converted to Roman Catholicism in 1930, after the failure of his first marriage. His traditionalist stance led him to oppose strongly all attempts to reform the Church; the changes brought about in the wake of the Second Vatican Council of 1962–65, particularly the introduction of the vernacular Mass, greatly disturbed him. This blow, together with a growing dislike for the welfare state culture of the postwar world and a decline in his health, saddened his final years, although he continued to write. To the public at large he generally displayed a mask of indifference, but he was capable of great kindness to those he considered his friends, many of whom remained devoted to him throughout his life. After his death in 1966, he acquired a new following through film and television versions of his work, such as Brideshead Revisited in 1981.
Biography
Family background
Lord Cockburn, the Scottish judge, was one of Waugh's great-great-grandfathers.

Arthur Evelyn St. John Waugh was born on 28 October 1903 to Arthur Waugh (1866–1943) and Catherine Charlotte Raban (1870–1954), into a family with English, Scottish, Welsh, Irish and Huguenot origins. Distinguished forebears include Lord Cockburn (1779–1854), a leading Scottish advocate and judge, William Morgan (1750–1833), a pioneer of actuarial science who served The Equitable Life Assurance Society for 56 years, and Philip Henry Gosse (1810–88), a natural scientist who became notorious through his depiction as a religious fanatic in his son Edmund's memoir Father and Son.[1] Of those bearing the Waugh name, the Rev. Alexander Waugh (1754–1827) was a minister in the Secession Church of Scotland who helped found the London Missionary Society, and was one of the leading Nonconformist preachers of his day.[2] His grandson Alexander Waugh (1840–1906) was a country medical practitioner who bullied his wife and children and became known in the Waugh family as "the Brute". The elder of his two sons, born in 1866, was Arthur Waugh.[3]

After attending Sherborne School and New College, Oxford, Arthur Waugh began a career in publishing and as a literary critic. In 1902 he became managing director of Chapman and Hall, publishers of the works of Charles Dickens.[4] He had married Catherine Raban (1870–1954)[5] in 1893; their first son Alexander Raban Waugh (always known as Alec) was born on 8 July 1898. Alec Waugh later became a novelist of note. At the time of his birth the family were living in North London, at Hillfield Road, West Hampstead where, on 28 October 1903, the couple's second son was born, "in great haste before Dr Andrews could arrive", Catherine recorded.[6] On 7 January 1904 the boy was christened Arthur Evelyn St John Waugh, but was known in the family and in the wider world as Evelyn.[7][n 1]
Childhood
Golders Green and Heath Mount

In 1907 the family left Hillfield Road for Underhill, a house which Arthur had built in nearby Golders Green,[8] then a semi-rural area of dairy farms, market gardens and bluebell woods.[9] Evelyn received his first lessons at home from his mother, with whom he formed a particularly close relationship—Arthur Waugh was a more distant figure, whose bond with his elder son Alec was such that Evelyn often felt excluded.[10][11] In September 1910 Evelyn began as a day pupil at Heath Mount preparatory school. He was by then a lively child of many interests, who had already written his first complete story, "The Curse of the Horse Race".[12] Waugh spent six relatively contented years at Heath Mount; on his own assertion he was "quite a clever little boy", who was seldom distressed or overawed by

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