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It does make a difference what you call things. Options
Daemon
Posted: Thursday, October 26, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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It does make a difference what you call things.

Kate Wiggin (1856-1923)
KSPavan
Posted: Thursday, October 26, 2017 1:40:08 AM

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Quotation of the Day

It does make a difference what you call things.

Kate Wiggin (1856-1923)
Jim Cape
Posted: Thursday, October 26, 2017 4:00:45 AM

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Here is my two expressions of the day, for the quote of the day. That's as clear as mud or WTF! It makes no sense the way it's written. Wheres the context that goes with it? Try this one. The river was full.
ibj_ldn
Posted: Thursday, October 26, 2017 8:27:14 AM

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Maybe it should (also) be "It does make a difference HOW you call AND TELL things." but I'm not a native speaker, so...
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Thursday, October 26, 2017 10:06:32 AM

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Wiggin, Kate Douglas
Wiggin, Kate Douglas (Smith), 1856–1923, American author and educator, b. Philadelphia. In San Francisco she organized the first free kindergartens on the Pacific coast (1878) and with her sister established a training school for kindergarten teachers. As part of her teaching career she wrote her first book, The Story of Patsy (1883). The most popular among her many later works for children were The Birds' Christmas Carol (1887), Timothy's Quest (1890), Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm (1903), and Mother Carey's Chickens (1911).
Bibliography

See her autobiography, My Garden of Memory (1923); biography by her sister, Nora A. Smith (1925).
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
Wiggin, Kate Douglas (Smith)(1856–1953) author, educator; born in Philadelphia, Pa. Raised in Maine, where her widowed mother moved to, she attended various schools in the Northeast before moving to California (1873) with her mother and stepfather. She took a course to be a kindergarten teacher and from 1877 on was active in operation of kindergartens and promoting the kindergarten movement in California. She married in 1881, moved to New York City in 1884, and after her husband's death in 1889 she began to concentrate on writing. Among her numerous books for children, her best known are Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm (1903) and Mother Carey's Chickens (1911). She also wrote some books for adults drawing on her many trips to Europe, and with her sister, Nora Smith, she wrote a three-volume book about the kindergarten movement, The Republic of Childhood (1895–96).
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.


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with my pleasure
FX2
Posted: Thursday, October 26, 2017 11:34:35 AM
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It does make a difference what you call things.

Kate Wiggin (1856-1923)



-- It is true!!! A bad hair day is a common day, just labeled differently.


Have a nice day!Drool
Bully_rus
Posted: Thursday, October 26, 2017 1:47:11 PM
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Daemon wrote:
It does make a difference what you call things.

Kate Wiggin (1856-1923)


Yeah. It's even more true when and how you call names...
Verbatim
Posted: Thursday, October 26, 2017 1:55:50 PM
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Not to "the things", only to what we think of them.
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