The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

The Lindbergh Operation Options
Daemon
Posted: Monday, October 23, 2017 12:00:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/7/2009
Posts: 22,026
Neurons: 66,081
Location: Inside Farlex computers
The Lindbergh Operation

The first so-called transatlantic operation, the Lindbergh Operation was a telesurgical procedure performed in September 2001 by a team of French surgeons located in New York on a patient in Strasbourg, France. The minimally invasive procedure to remove the patient's gallbladder was performed by a surgical robot that received instructions from a doctor via a high-speed fiber optic service. The virtual elimination of what inherent aspect of long-distance transmissions made the procedure possible? More...
KSPavan
Posted: Monday, October 23, 2017 1:17:32 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/28/2015
Posts: 2,005
Neurons: 1,975,780
Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India
Article of the Day
The Lindbergh Operation
The first so-called transatlantic operation, the Lindbergh Operation was a telesurgical procedure performed in September 2001 by a team of French surgeons located in New York on a patient in Strasbourg, France. The minimally invasive procedure to remove the patient's gallbladder was performed by a surgical robot that received instructions from a doctor via a high-speed fiber optic service.
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Monday, October 23, 2017 8:31:42 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/27/2014
Posts: 1,744
Neurons: 886,964
Location: Tbilisi, T'bilisi, Georgia
High-speed fibre optic service must have been key in this case, IMO.
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Monday, October 23, 2017 9:45:57 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/19/2017
Posts: 759
Neurons: 68,526
Location: Baghdad, Mayorality of Baghdad, Iraq

Lindbergh Operation
Also found in: Medical.
Lindbergh Operation

The Lindbergh operation was a complete tele-surgical operation carried out by a team of French surgeons located in New York on a patient in Strasbourg, France (over a distance of several thousand miles) using telecommunications solutions based on high-speed services and sophisticated surgical robotics. The operation was performed successfully on September 7, 2001 by Professor Jacques Marescaux and his team from the IRCAD (Institute for Research into Cancer of the Digestive System). This was the first time in medical history that a technical solution proved capable of reducing the time delay inherent to long distance transmissions sufficiently to make this type of procedure possible. The name was derived from that of American aviator Charles Lindbergh, because he was the first person to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean.
Details of the procedure

The operation involved minimally invasive surgery: The 45-minute procedure consisted of a cholecystectomy on a 68-year-old female patient in surgical ward A in Strasbourg Civil Hospital, in Eastern France. From New York, the surgeon controlled the arms of the ZEUS Robotic Surgical System, designed by Computer Motion, to operate on the patient. The link between the robotic system and the surgeon was provided by a high-speed fiberoptic service deployed thanks to the combined efforts of several France Telecom group entities.

Commenting on the operation, Professor Marescaux said:
“ I believe that this demonstration of the feasibility of a completely safe remotely performed surgical procedure—and notably the first trans-Atlantic operation—ushers in the third revolution we've seen in the field of surgery in the past ten years.

The first was the arrival of minimally invasive surgery, enabling procedures to be performed with guidance by a camera, meaning that the abdomen and thorax do not have to be opened. The second was the introduction of computer-assisted surgery, where artificial intelligence enhances the safety of the surgeon's movements during a procedure, rendering them more accurate, while introducing the concept of distance between the surgeon and the patient. It was thus a natural extrapolation to imagine that this distance—currently several meters in the operating room—could potentially be up to several thousand kilometers.
This is what we have just demonstrated thanks to the combined technical prowess of Computer Motion, which created the digital robot required, and France Telecom, which was able to deploy a broadband transmission service with optimized compression, thus limiting the time delay between the command of the action and its return on the monitor to a level that is virtually imperceptible to the human eye.
The demonstration of the feasibility of a trans-Atlantic procedure—dubbed 'Oper

with my pleasure
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2017 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.