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The Saturday Night Massacre (1973) Options
Daemon
Posted: Friday, October 20, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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The Saturday Night Massacre (1973)

While investigating the Watergate scandal, special prosecutor Archibald Cox subpoenaed audiotapes of conversations implicating US President Richard Nixon in a cover-up of a burglary of the Democratic headquarters at the Watergate Hotel in Washington, DC. Nixon refused to produce the tapes and ordered the US attorney general and his deputy to fire Cox. On the same Saturday, both men resigned in protest, and public outcry eventually forced Nixon to surrender the tapes. What happened to Cox? More...
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Friday, October 20, 2017 2:46:18 AM

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Saturday Night Massacre
Saturday Night Massacre
Watergate scandal
WatergateFromAir.JPG
Events

Timeline

"White House horrors"

1972 presidential election

Watergate burglaries

White House tapes

"Saturday Night Massacre"

United States v. Nixon

Inauguration of Gerald Ford

People

Watergate burglars

James W. McCord, Jr. Bernard Barker Frank Sturgis Virgilio Gonzalez Eugenio Martinez

Committee for the Re-Election
of the President (CRP)

Jeb Magruder John N. Mitchell Robert Mardian Fred LaRue Kenneth Parkinson Maurice Stans

White House

John Dean E. Howard Hunt Egil Krogh Gerald Ford G. Gordon Liddy John Ehrlichman H. R. Haldeman Charles Colson Gordon C. Strachan Alexander Butterfield Richard Nixon Rose Mary Woods

Judiciary

Archibald Cox Leon Jaworski John Sirica

Journalists

Carl Bernstein Bob Woodward

Intelligence community

Richard Helms James Schlesinger L. Patrick Gray
W. Mark Felt
aka "Deep Throat"

Congress

Sam Ervin Howard Baker Peter Rodino

Groups

Committee for the Re-Election
of the President (CRP)

"White House Plumbers"

Senate Watergate Committee

The Washington Post

The Saturday Night Massacre was the term given by political commentators[1] to U.S. President Richard Nixon's executive dismissal of independent special prosecutor Archibald Cox, and the resignations of Attorney General Elliot Richardson and Deputy Attorney General William Ruckelshaus on October 20, 1973 during the Watergate scandal.[2][3][4]
History

Richardson appointed Cox in May of that year, after having given assurances to the House Judiciary Committee that he would appoint a special prosecutor to investigate the events surrounding the Watergate break-in of June 17, 1972. The appointment was created as a Career Reserved position in the Justice department, which meant (a) it came under the authority of the Attorney General, and (b) the incumbent could not be removed for any reason other than "for cause" (e.g. gross improprieties or malfeasance in office). Richardson had, in his confirmation hearings before the U.S. Senate, given the explicit promise not to use his ministerial authority to dismiss the Watergate Special Prosecutor, unless for cause.

When Cox issued a subpoena to President Nixon, asking for copies of taped conversations recorded in the Oval Office and authorized by Nixon as evidence, the president initially refused to comply. On Friday, October 19, 1973, Nixon offered what was later known as the Stennis Compromise—asking U.S. Senator John C. Stennis to review and summarize the tapes for the special prosecutor's office. Since Stennis was famously hard-of-hearing, Cox refused the compromise that same evening and it was believed that there would be a short rest in the legal maneuvering while government offices were closed for the weekend.

However, the following day Nixon ordered Attorney General Richardson to fire Cox. Richardson refused, and resigned in protest. Nixon then ordered Deputy Attorney General William Ruckelshaus to fire Cox. He also refused and resigned.[5][6]

Nixon then ordered the Solicitor General, Robert Bork (as acting head of the Justice Department) to fire Cox. Both Richardson and Ruckelshaus had given personal assurances to the congressional oversight committee that they would not interfere, but Bork had not. Though Bork claims that he believed Nixon's order to be valid and appropriate, he considered resigning to avoid being "perceived as a man who did the President's bidding to save my job."[7] Nevertheless, having been brought to the White House by limousine and sworn in as Acting Attorney General, Bork wrote the letter firin

with my pleasure
KSPavan
Posted: Friday, October 20, 2017 3:24:13 AM

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This Day in History
The Saturday Night Massacre (1973)
While investigating the Watergate scandal, special prosecutor Archibald Cox subpoenaed audiotapes of conversations implicating US President Richard Nixon in a cover-up of a burglary of the Democratic headquarters at the Watergate Hotel in Washington, DC. Nixon refused to produce the tapes and ordered the US attorney general and his deputy to fire Cox. On the same Saturday, both men resigned in protest, and public outcry eventually forced Nixon to surrender the tapes.
taurine
Posted: Friday, October 20, 2017 3:29:04 AM

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Well, well... Senator Ted Kennedy, infamous womanizer and a drunken driver of a car in which drowned a woman had his say against Cox.
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