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Daemon
Posted: Saturday, October 14, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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Vajra

The Vajra is a ritual object that holds a symbolic significance to Buddhists and Hindus. The scepter-like implement, whose name means both "thunderbolt" and "diamond" in Sanskrit, is said to have the ability to cut through ignorance like a thunderbolt and be indestructible like a diamond. In Buddhist rituals, it is often employed in conjunction with a bell in order to achieve enlightenment. In Hindu mythology, the vajra is the weapon of the god Indra and is said to be made of what? More...
KSPavan
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Vajra
The Vajra is a ritual object that holds a symbolic significance to Buddhists and Hindus. The scepter-like implement, whose name means both "thunderbolt" and "diamond" in Sanskrit, is said to have the ability to cut through ignorance like a thunderbolt and be indestructible like a diamond. In Buddhist rituals, it is often employed in conjunction with a bell in order to achieve enlightenment. In Hindu mythology, the vajra is the weapon of the god Indra.
KSPavan
Posted: Saturday, October 14, 2017 1:29:20 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/28/2015
Posts: 2,020
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Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India
Article of the Day
Vajra
The Vajra is a ritual object that holds a symbolic significance to Buddhists and Hindus. The scepter-like implement, whose name means both "thunderbolt" and "diamond" in Sanskrit, is said to have the ability to cut through ignorance like a thunderbolt and be indestructible like a diamond. In Buddhist rituals, it is often employed in conjunction with a bell in order to achieve enlightenment. In Hindu mythology, the vajra is the weapon of the god Indra.
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Saturday, October 14, 2017 3:35:29 AM

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Vajra
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Vajra
Vajra.jpg
A Viśvavajra or "double vajra" appears in the emblem of Bhutan.

Vajra (Devanagari: वज्र; Chinese: 金剛 jīngāng; Korean: 금강저 geumgangjeo; Tibetan: རྡོ་རྗེ། dorje;[1][2][3] Dzongkha (Bhutan): dorji; Japanese: 金剛杵 kongōsho) is a Sanskrit word meaning both thunderbolt and diamond.[2] It is also a common male name in Tibet and Bhutan. Additionally, it is a symbolic ritual object that symbolizes both the properties of a diamond (indestructibility) and a thunderbolt (irresistible force).

The vajra is used symbolically by the Dharma traditions of Buddhism, Jainism and Hinduism, often to represent firmness of spirit and spiritual power.[4] The use of the vajra as a symbolic and ritual tool spread from India along with Indian religion and culture to other parts of East and Southeast Asia.
Early descriptions

The earliest mention of the Vajra is in the Rigveda, a part of four Vedas. It is described as the weapon of Indra, the god of heaven and the chief deity of the Rigvedic pantheon. Indra is described as using the Vajra to kill sinners and ignorant persons.[5] The Rigveda states that the weapon was made for Indra by Tvastar, the maker of divine instruments. The associated story describes Indra using the Vajra, which he held in his hand, to slay the Asura Vritra, who took the form of a serpent.[6]

On account of his skill in wielding the Vajra, some epithets used for Indra in the Rigveda were Vajrabhrit (bearing the bolt), Vajrivat or Vajrin (armed with the bolt), Vajradaksina (holding the bolt in his right hand), and Vajrabahu or Vajrahasta (holding the Vajra in his hand). The association of the Vajra with Indra was continued with some modifications in the later Puranic literature, and in Buddhist works. Buddhaghosa, a major figure of Theravada Buddhism in the 5th century, identified the Bodhisattva Vajrapani with Indra.[7]
The Vajra in the Puranas
Indra's Vajra as the privy seal of King Rama VI of Thailand.

Many later Puranas describe the Vajra, with the story modified from the Rigvedic original. One major addition involves the role of the Sage Dadhichi. According to one account, Indra, the King of the devas was once driven out of devaloka by an asura named Vritra. The asura was the recipient of a boon whereby he could not be killed by any weapon that was known till the date of his receiving the boon and additionally that no weapon made of wood or metal could harm him.[8]) Indra, who had lost all hope of recovering his kingdom was said to have approached Shiva who could not help him. Indra along with Shiva and Brahma went to seek the aid of Vishnu. Vishnu revealed to Indra that only the weapon made from the bones of the sage Dadhichi would defeat Vritra.[8] Indra and the other devas therefore approached the sage, whom Indra had once beheaded, and asked him for his aid in defeating Vritra. Dadhichi acceded to the devas' request but said that he wished that he had time to go on a pilgrimage to all the holy rivers before he gave up his life for them.[9] Indra then brought together all the waters of the holy rivers to Naimisharanya,[9] thereby allowing the sage to have his wish fulfilled without a further loss of time. Dadhichi is then said to have given up his life by the art of Yoga after which the Devas fashioned the Vajrayudha from his spine. This weapon was then used to defeat the asura, allowing Indra to reclaim his place as the King of devaloka

Another version of the story exists where Dadhichi was asked to safeguard the weapons of the devas as they were unable to match the arcane arts being employed by the asuras to obtain them. Dadhichi is said to have kept at the task for a very long time and finally tiring of the job, he is said to have dissolved the weapons in sacred water which he drank.[10]) The devas returned a long time later and asked him to return their weapons so that they might defeat the asuras, headed by Vritra, once in for all. Dadhichi however told them of what he had done and informed them that their weapons were now a part of his bones. However, Dadhichi, realising that his bones were the only way by which the devas could defeat the asuras willingly gave his life in a pit of mystical flames he summoned with the power of his austerities.[10] Brahma is then said to have fashioned a large number of weapons from Dadhichi's bones, including the Vajrayudha, which was fashioned from his spine. The devas are then said to have defeated the asuras using the weapons thus created.

There have also been instances where the war god Skanda (Murugan) is described as holding a Vajra.[11] Skanda is also the name of a Bodhisattva in Mahayana Buddhism who wields a Vajra.
Vajra in Vajrayana Buddhism

with my pleasure
monamagda
Posted: Saturday, October 14, 2017 12:18:57 PM

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Indra and Airavath fighting Vritra with Vajra made from Maharishi Dadhichi’s Bone


According to one account Indra the King of the devas was once driven out of devaloka by an asura named Vritra. The asura was the recipient of a boon whereby he could not be killed by any weapon that was known till the date of his receiving the boon and additionally that no weapon made of wood or metal could harm him. Indra, who had lost all hope of recovering his kingdom was said to have approached Shiva who could not help him. Indra along with Shiva and Brahma went to seek the aid of Vishnu. Vishnu revealed to Indra that only the weapon made from the bones of the sage Dadhichi would defeat Vritra. Indra and the other devas therefore approached the sage, whom Indra had once beheaded, and asked him for his aid in defeating Vritra. Dadhichi acceded to the devas’ request but said that he wished that he had time to go on a pilgrimage to all the holy rivers before he gave up his life for them. Indra then brought together all the waters of the holy rivers to Naimisharanya, thereby allowing the sage to have his wish fulfilled without a further loss of time. Dadhichi is then said to have given up his life by the art of Yoga after which the Devas fashioned the Vajrayudha from his spine this weapon was then used to defeat the asura, allowing Indra to reclaim his place as the King of devaloka. There have also been instances where the war god Skanda (Murugan) is described as holding a Vajra. Skanda is also the name of a Bodhisattva in Mahayana Buddhism who wields a Vajra.

https://www.templepurohit.com/story-of-maharishi-dadhichi/
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