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Profile: DavidLearn
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User Name: DavidLearn
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Joined: Monday, January 27, 2014
Last Visit: Friday, May 18, 2018 1:10:33 AM
Number of Posts: 3,225
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Should I also underlined "ago" in order to get the question?
Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 4:22:01 PM
NKM wrote:
The usual answer would be "It was twenty-four hours ago."

"Twenty-four hours ago he escaped from prison" is not how anybody would answer the question as presented. It might be the answer to some other question:

  "Why are we talking about him?"
  "Twenty-four hours ago he escaped from prison."




Hi NKM,
What does the "It" substitute or is it the dummy subject?

David.
Topic: Should I also underlined "ago" in order to get the question?
Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 4:13:48 PM
Hi everyone,
Thank you all for your help and comments.
It's a listening exercise, so I can't change anything about that.

This is the paragraph where I took the sentence from.
The inspector waited, and the Chief of Police looked at him coldly. ‘What are you waiting for?’ she asked. ‘Go out and find him! Three months ago this man – Alex Dinon – killed the President of our country. He’s a murderer – a dangerous man. Twenty-four hours ago he escaped from prison, and our new President wants him back in prison–today! Now! At once!’

I believe this one is correct:
How long ago did he escape from prison?
a) (He escaped from prison) twenty-four hours ago.
b) It was twenty-four hours ago.

David.
Topic: Should I also underlined "ago" in order to get the question?
Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 9:22:06 AM
Hi teachers,
According to the underlined part, I believe the question is the one I've written. My question is about "ago" in the answer, should I also underlined it in order to get the question or not?

How long ago did he escape from prison?
Twenty-four hours ago he escaped from prison.

Thanks.
Topic: Could the synonym express the meaning?
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 3:44:43 PM
NKM wrote:
Actually, "started to be" is essentially a literal definition of "became", but it wouldn't feel right in this sentence, because the "starting" wouldn't have lasted for 30 years. "Became" doesn't so strongly partake of the momentary aspect of "beginning".

That said, I don't really like "became" here either, even though it is often used that way despite its (softened) connotation of something that happens quickly at the onset. I'd prefer "came to be" instead.

 "… she moved into the Ritz Hotel in Paris, which came to be her home for 30 years."



Hi NKM,
A very interesting explanation. I appreciate that.

David.
Topic: Is there a synonym that expresses that meaning?
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 3:22:12 PM
NKM wrote:
Another possibility: "… rose to become known as …"



Hi NKM,
Thanks for yours!

David.
Topic: Is this question natural?
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 2:11:01 PM
hedy mmm wrote:
DavidLearn wrote:
Teachers,
Is this question natural?
How long ago did you finish your Easter holidays and came back to Barcelona?


Hi DavidLearn,

Firstly,
'Easter holiday' should be singular, (not holidays) for a holiday can be a few days in different places but still considered a holiday. If we speak of different or even same location at a different time, then it would be plural. For eg., "How long ago did you finish your Easter and Passover holidays and return to Barcelona."

In the case of just Easter, it could be a whole week...from Palm Sunday through the day after Easter Sunday, as in the USA's Bd. of Ed schools, which here we call Easter or Spring Break.

Secondly, It's necessary to know where the one inquiring is, geographically:

How long ago did you finish your Easter holiday and come back to Barcelona?
In this instance, the inquirer is in Barcelona.

How long ago did you finish your Easter holiday and return to Barcelona?, which is similar to the original question.
Or
When did you get back to Barcelona after your Easter Break?, as towan52 suggests.
In these instances, the inquirer is not necessarily in Barcelona.

It's the same definition in Spanish/English and American/ English.


Hi hedy mmm,
Thanks for your reply and explanations. I thought that the only time we can use "holidays" in plural, was for Christmas Holidays and Easter holidays.

In American English, holidays covers more than one day, and is implicit in the conversation as relating to Easter Holidays, Christmas Holidays, etc. Right?

David.
Topic: Could the synonym express the meaning?
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 2:07:38 PM
Hi teachers,
I wonder if "started to be" could be a synonym for "become" in this context?

At the beginning of World War II she moved into the Ritz Hotel in Paris, which became her home for 30 years.

Thanks.
Topic: Is there a synonym that expresses that meaning?
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 2:04:31 PM
FounDit wrote:
DavidLearn wrote:
Hi teachers,
I wonder if "transform", "start to be" or "have the position of" could be synonyms for "become" in this context?
In the 1920s, Chanel rose to become Paris’ top fashion designer.

Thanks.



The only one I think might work would be the last one, but omit "have".

In the 1920s, Chanel rose to the position of Paris’ top fashion designer.

She rose to this position. The reason I say omit the "have" is because I don't think Paris had an official position called Top Fashion Designer. If I'm wrong about that, then it does work.

Hi FounDit,
Thanks for your help and comments.

David.
Topic: Is there a synonym that expresses that meaning?
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 12:39:25 PM
Hi teachers,
I wonder if "transform", "start to be" or "have the position of" could be synonyms for "become" in this context?
In the 1920s, Chanel rose to become Paris’ top fashion designer.

Thanks.

Topic: Is this question natural?
Posted: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 10:29:05 AM
Thank you all for your help and comments. Angel

David.

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