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Profile: DavidLearn
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User Name: DavidLearn
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Joined: Monday, January 27, 2014
Last Visit: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 7:33:19 AM
Number of Posts: 3,245
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Are both ideas correct?
Posted: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 5:19:23 PM
Hi teachers,
This dialogue is from the movie Despicable Me 2.

Agnes: What are you doing out here?
Gru: Remember when you said that I liked Lucy? Well, it turns out... you're right.
Agnes: Really?
Gru: Yes, but… well, she’s moving away. I’m never going to see her again.

I wrote the question and the answer myself.
What was Agnes right about?
She was right about Gru liking Lucy.

If the question and the answer is correct, are both ideas also correct?
a) Do I have to write "liking" in gerund just because there's the preposition "about" in that answer?
b) Linking is a gerund functioning as a noun.

Thanks.




Topic: Are both questions natural and equally correct?
Posted: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 4:58:45 PM
Audiendus wrote:
DavidLearn wrote:
I don't think I get things straightforward.
How did Peter feel? The question asks about how Peter felt, about his emotional condition, about his emotions then; right?

Don't they mean the same as "How did Peter feel?"?
a) What did Peter feel like?
b) What was Peter's emotional condition (like)?
c) What were Peter's emotions (like)?
d) What was his emotional state (like)?

The problem with "What did Peter feel like?" is that it is ambiguous. It could mean "What was Peter's emotional condition (like)?", but it could have either of the other two meanings mentioned by Drag0nspeaker, i.e. "What physical object did he feel similar to?" or "What did he want to do?".

"How did Peter feel?" avoids this ambiguity. It is not restricted to just one of these meanings, but is a general question about Peter's emotional/mental state.

If I ask someone how they feel, they may give various answers, e.g:

"I feel sad".
"I feel like an idiot."
"I feel like a mere machine."
"I feel like quitting."

The question is general, so they may interpret "feel" how they wish.

Hi Audiendus,
Thanks fo the explanations. I do have a much better picture now. "How does somebody feel?" asks directly about an emotional or mental state.

David.
Topic: Are both questions natural and equally correct?
Posted: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 2:30:43 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Both questions are natural and correct - however the first one is not so likely to be asked.

a) What did Peter feel like? - this means "What thing feels the same as Peter, when you touch it?" or "What did Peter want to do?"

What did Peter feel like?
He felt like a warm piece of meat.
He felt like eating an ice cream.

b) How did he feel?
He felt like a teenager going out on a first date.


Hi Drag0n,
I appreciate your reply.
I don't think I get things straightforward.
How did Peter feel? The question asks about how Peter felt, about his emotional condition, about his emotions then; right?

Don't they mean the same as "How did Peter feel?"?
a) What did Peter feel like?
b) What was Peter's emotional condition (like)?
c) What were Peter's emotions (like)?
d) What was his emotional state (like)?

David.
Topic: Are both questions natural and equally correct?
Posted: Monday, January 21, 2019 5:18:53 PM
Hello teachers,
Are both questions natural and equally correct? Do both of them ask about his emotional condition?

a) What did Peter feel like?
b) How did he feel?
He felt like a teenager going out on a first date.

Thanks.
Topic: Are the questions correct?
Posted: Sunday, January 20, 2019 12:44:40 PM
FounDit wrote:
There are several ways to ask this using both what and how. Including the ones that I wrote; right?

What is Peter feeling?
How would you describe Peter's emotional state?
What is his emotional state?
What emotion do you think he is feeling?


Hi FounDit,
Thanks a lot for your help once again.

David.
Topic: Are the questions correct?
Posted: Sunday, January 20, 2019 12:20:38 PM
Hi teachers,
Peter is annoyed.

The natural question is "How is Peter?"; right?
Could these questions be also correct to explain the meaning of the one above to the students?
a) What is his emotional state/condition (like)?
b) What are his emotions (like)?
To say the ones above with "How" instead of "What" is not correct, is it?

Thanks.
Topic: Which one is better?
Posted: Saturday, January 19, 2019 2:28:55 AM
FounDit wrote:
DavidLearn wrote:
Hello teachers,
I'm editing a movie with a video editor and a screen capture software to ask questions in class. If the location changes from one frame to the other, which one is better?
a) Location change(s)
b) Change of location

Thanks.


You could say: "location change" or "change of location". Both will work fine. I tend to favor the "change of location" choice.

Hello FounDit,
I appreciate your help.

David.
Topic: Which one is better?
Posted: Friday, January 18, 2019 2:15:47 PM
Hello teachers,
I'm editing a movie with a video editor and a screen capture software to ask questions in class. If the location changes from one frame to the other, which one is better?
a) Location changes
b) Change of location

Thanks.
Topic: simple present
Posted: Saturday, January 5, 2019 8:34:50 AM
Tara2 wrote:
DavidLearn wrote:
Hi Tara,
Though the present simple’s main use is for general rules, and grammatically represents timeless facts, native speakers often use it in an colloquial setting for storytelling. This can be to recount a past event, a film or book plot, or for running commentaries.

The present simple is also commonly used to give narratives of consumed stories, for example the plots of films, books and plays.

This is used to put the listener in the moment of the story. This technique is sometimes used in creative writing, as well as in spoken language.

I hope it helps.

David.

Hi David
Thank you
This book isn't a story or novel. It's my book in university.
In all books they use present simple?

Depends on the author. But as said, the present simple is commonly used to give narratives. Even though most narratives are told in the simple past, they are also written in present simple.

Narrative:
1) A story or account of events, experiences, or the like, whether true or fictitious.
2) A book, literary work, etc., containing such a story.
3) The art, technique, or process of narrating, or of telling a story.

David.
Topic: simple present
Posted: Saturday, January 5, 2019 6:30:01 AM
Hi Tara,
Though the present simple’s main use is for general rules, and grammatically represents timeless facts, native speakers often use it in an colloquial setting for storytelling. This can be to recount a past event, a film or book plot, or for running commentaries.

The present simple is also commonly used to give narratives of consumed stories, for example the plots of films, books and plays.

This is used to put the listener in the moment of the story. This technique is sometimes used in creative writing, as well as in spoken language.

I hope it helps.

David.

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