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Profile: DavidLearn
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User Name: DavidLearn
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Joined: Monday, January 27, 2014
Last Visit: Tuesday, November 26, 2019 6:34:45 PM
Number of Posts: 3,585
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Please, could you correct or confirm these paragraphs?
Posted: Tuesday, November 26, 2019 4:23:10 PM
Hi FounDit,
I really DO appreciate your corrections and time. It looks a lot better.

David.
Topic: Please, could you correct or confirm these paragraphs?
Posted: Tuesday, November 26, 2019 11:52:03 AM
Hi Teachers.

Please, could you correct or confirm this mail?

Juan told me that a client had received a wheel chair through the old distributor with whom he was not happy.
The problem is that the client already had a wheel chair and wanted to buy another one with the exact same measurement.
As you can see, the chair that was delivered does not have the same measurement that the client requested.

I believe option "b" is better, isn't it?
a) Anyway, the first thing that I need you to pass me are the drawings of the two chairs to be able to compare them.
b) Anyway, the first thing that I need are the drawings of the two chairs in order to be able to compare them.

What can we do to solve the problem? Because although this problem comes from Rehagirona, I would like to give a solution to the client.
Do you think I can give him some kind of solution?
Please, tell me something asap because the client is very angry and has been waiting for a solution for 2 months.

Another question:
Instead of "measurement", could it be better to say "dimensions"?

Thanks.
Topic: Could you correct these directions?
Posted: Wednesday, November 20, 2019 2:04:20 PM
FounDit wrote:
Ah, well, knowing they have a list to choose from does help, and I can see it would make the exercise easier to complete.

I should have explained that from the very beginning. Anxious

FounDit wrote:
So to answer your question about a) or b), both use the word "know", or "in order to know".

There is nothing wrong with those, but you could also use the words "to determine". But that may be just me. Either would work. I just lean slightly more towards determine.

To complete these wh-questions and answers, first look at the bold words in the answers to determine the question word. Then according to the tense in red, use the correct forms of the given verbs.

I really like, to determine; I'll use it in the directions. Thanks a lot for your help, FounDit.

David.
Topic: Could you correct these directions?
Posted: Wednesday, November 20, 2019 5:05:49 AM
Thanks for your opinions to both of you.

I have already done the exercise and the students like it because we made groups in class to do it. I just wanted to be sure that the directions were right or if the could be easier.

Let me explain the exercise, please.
On the previous pages to the exercise there are charts to explain the language rules for three tenses: present progressive, present simple, and simple future.
There's also another page explaining the use of a few question words.
Let me write a few examples of that.

"What time" introduces questions about specific time (hours).
In short: time (specific).

"Where" introduces questions about place, position or direction.
In short: place or direction.

"Why" introduces questions about the reason, about the motive for an action or situation.
In short: reason or motive.

"How often" introduces questions about frequency.
In short: frequency.

And so on.


Then comes the first answer for the students based on the explanations about question words and the bold words in the given answer, in the example I gave you is "every day". Since "every day" is there in the answer, they have to know which is the most appropriate question word. Writing "frequency" after "The bold part indicates the...", helps them to know the question word that is more suitable in this case, "How often".

The bold part indicates the ________________________________.


After that I give them the tense and simple form of the verb they have to use, in order to fill in the blanks both, the question and the answer.

Tense: Simple Present
Principal Verb: HAVE

_______ _________ ______ they _________ coffee for breakfast?
They __________ coffee for breakfast every day.


I hope I have explained myself clearer, if not do tell me.

David.





Topic: Could you correct these directions?
Posted: Monday, November 18, 2019 1:19:43 PM
Hi teachers,
I would like to know if the following directions are correct. Is it better "b" than "a"?

a) To complete these wh-questions and answers, first look at the bold words in the answers to know the question word. Then according to the tense in red, use the correct forms of the given verbs.

b) To complete these wh-questions and answers, first look at the bold words in the answers in order to know the question word. Then according to the tense in red, use the correct forms of the given verbs.

Example:

The bold part indicates the ________________________________

Tense: Simple Present
Principal Verb: HAVE

1. _______ _________ ______ they _________ coffee for breakfast?
They __________ coffee for breakfast every day.



Solution:
The bold part indicates the frequency.

Tense: Simple Present
Principal Verb: HAVE

1. How often do they have coffee for breakfast?
They have coffee for breakfast every day.

Thanks.
Topic: Are the explanations correct?
Posted: Monday, October 28, 2019 2:13:22 AM
Hi Hedy,
Thanks for your reply.

David.
Topic: Are the explanations correct?
Posted: Sunday, October 27, 2019 10:55:40 AM
Hi teachers,
Do you agree with the following explanations about the differences between them?

The present perfect can be used to talk about unfinished actions that started in the past and are still true in the present. This is often possible with the prepositions "since" or "for" and the verbs "study, know, work, stay, live, teach, and wear"; also with stative verbs.

In other words, the present perfect except for the verbs mentioned before doesn't apply for actions going on at the moment of speaking.
For actions going on at the moment of speaking with the prepositions "since" and "for", we have to use present perfect continuous.

Examples:
a) I've watched a very interesting film. (I'm not watching it now. I've watched it at sometime in my life, recent or not.)
b) I've been watching a very interesting film for an hour. (I'm still watching the film now.)
c) I've been watching a very interesting film since nine. Now it's about ten. (I'm still watching the film now.)

Thanks.
Topic: A simple question.
Posted: Sunday, October 27, 2019 10:11:37 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hi again.
I think all your suggestions are OK . . .
"What does the fireman who followed. . ." and "What did the fireman who followed . . ." are both fine - but "following" works for both past and present tenses.
I don't think any one of them is better then the others.

"The" before axes - yes, it's totally OK. There are a specific set of axes being carried in the film, so the definite article would fit.
I think, actually, that I would probably say "the axes" if I were asking the question right after seeing the film - but I don't think it's better than just "axes".

****************
I see the subject of the clause as the whole noun-phrase "the fireman who followed the one with the axes". Definitely not just "fireman" - though that is the "base noun" of the noun-phrase.

You made me think for a minute or two there . . .
As an interrogative, the subject comes after the auxiliary verb "did".

In the answer, you could make "the fireman" (or "he") OR "a hose" the subject
What did the fireman who followed the one with axes have in his hand?
1. He had a hose.
2. A hose was what he had.


Trying to be perfectly logical, "What did he have?" seems to be answered by "A hose was what he had."
However, it seems much more natural to just say "He had a hose."

Hi Drag0n,
Thanks for the explanations. Crystal clear now. Dancing

What does the fireman following the one with the axes have in his hand?
Subject + gerund phrase = "the fireman following the one with the axes". Right?

David.
Topic: A simple question.
Posted: Saturday, October 26, 2019 10:41:27 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
I agree with pjharvey.

Though I, personally, would never use "that" as a pronoun for a person (any more than I would call a baby "it"), it IS a correct grammatical form which has existed since at least Shakespeare's days.

Quote:
"There is a widespread belief, sometimes taught as correct usage, that only 'who' and not 'that' should be used to introduce a restrictive relative clause identifying a person. But 'that' has been used in this way for centuries, going back to the Old English period, and has been used by the finest writers in English, as in "The man that once did sell the lion's skin / While the beast liv'd, was kill'd with hunting him" (Shakespeare). and "Scatter thou the people that delight in war" (King James Bible). In contemporary usage, 'who' predominates in such contexts, but 'that' is used with sufficient frequency to be considered standard . . ."
American Heritage Dictionary

Also, yes, it is a defining relative clause, so doesn't need commas - and it should all be in the past (OR all in the present would work too, as you are asking the question about a film-clip which still exists).

Srirr is right that "follows" needs to be the third person singular, not "follow".

And "one", used in this way, follows context as Srirr says. "One" refers back to the subject noun before it (fireman).

******************
Using the very 'neutral' word "carrying" isn't a "better grammatical form", but removes any difficult choices about "that/who/which" and tenses.

You have seen the film. What did the fireman following the one with axes have in his hand? (considering the 'seeing of the film' as a past thing)

In this film, what does the fireman following the one with axes have in his hand? (considering 'the film' as a present, existing thing)


I also appreciate your help and explanations, Drag0n.

Drag0nspeaker wrote:
What did the fireman following the one with axes have in his hand?

This one is also correct, isn't it?
What did the fireman who followed the one with axes have in his hand?

Drag0nspeaker wrote:
What does the fireman following the one with axes have in his hand?

This one is also correct, isn't it?
What does the fireman who follows the one with axes have in his hand?

What about using "the" in front of "axes"?

Another question:
The subject in my sentences is "the fireman who followed/follows the one with axes", not just "the fireman"; right?

David.


Topic: A simple question.
Posted: Saturday, October 26, 2019 10:40:43 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
I agree with pjharvey.

Though I, personally, would never use "that" as a pronoun for a person (any more than I would call a baby "it"), it IS a correct grammatical form which has existed since at least Shakespeare's days.

Quote:
"There is a widespread belief, sometimes taught as correct usage, that only 'who' and not 'that' should be used to introduce a restrictive relative clause identifying a person. But 'that' has been used in this way for centuries, going back to the Old English period, and has been used by the finest writers in English, as in "The man that once did sell the lion's skin / While the beast liv'd, was kill'd with hunting him" (Shakespeare). and "Scatter thou the people that delight in war" (King James Bible). In contemporary usage, 'who' predominates in such contexts, but 'that' is used with sufficient frequency to be considered standard . . ."
American Heritage Dictionary

Also, yes, it is a defining relative clause, so doesn't need commas - and it should all be in the past (OR all in the present would work too, as you are asking the question about a film-clip which still exists).

Srirr is right that "follows" needs to be the third person singular, not "follow".

And "one", used in this way, follows context as Srirr says. "One" refers back to the subject noun before it (fireman).

******************
Using the very 'neutral' word "carrying" isn't a "better grammatical form", but removes any difficult choices about "that/who/which" and tenses.

You have seen the film. What did the fireman following the one with axes have in his hand? (considering the 'seeing of the film' as a past thing)

In this film, what does the fireman following the one with axes have in his hand? (considering 'the film' as a present, existing thing)

I also appreciate your help and explanations, Drag0n.

[quote=Drag0nspeaker]What did the fireman following the one with axes have in his hand?
This one is also correct, isn't it?
What did the fireman who followed the one with axes have in his hand?

[quote=Drag0nspeaker]what does the fireman following the one with axes have in his hand?
This one is also correct, isn't it?
What does the fireman who follows the one with axes have in his hand?

What about using "the" in front of "axes"?

David.


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