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Profile: DavidLearn
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User Name: DavidLearn
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Joined: Monday, January 27, 2014
Last Visit: Friday, March 22, 2019 7:15:51 AM
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Final approaches (11)
Posted: Friday, March 22, 2019 2:31:32 AM
Audiendus wrote:
I use the word 'phrase' to mean any group of consecutive words that functions as a (complete) unit. So a clause is a type of phrase. Clauses are a subset of phrases. Technically, a phrase can also be a single word.

See the Wiki article on 'phrase':

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phrase


Hi Audiendus,
I appreciate your reply.
Technically, all gerunds are nouns and all gerund phrases are noun phrases, but not all nouns are gerunds and not all noun phrases are gerund phrases.

David.
Topic: Final approaches (11)
Posted: Thursday, March 21, 2019 5:25:38 PM
sureshot wrote:
Your assertion is an oversimplification. A phrase is a group of words. Such a group of words should not constitute a clause. However, a phrase can be a part of a clause.

I believe, a phrase consists of one or more words without a subject-verb combination.

sureshot wrote:
Your two examples have used the gerunds 'reading" and 'singing" as subjects of the two sentences. However, they do not comprise a phrase. They are single words and are each a part of the two simple sentence. The two simple sentences are each an independent clause.

According to the grammar definition of phrase, they do.

In the first sentence, "is relaxing" is a predicate. Similarly, in the second sentence, the predicate is "makes Carol happy".

If the subject of the first sentence is modified to "reading at night", it becomes a noun phrase. Similarly, if the subject of the second sentence is modified as "Singing popular songs" it comprises a noun phrase. These phrases are a part of the independent clause, which are also simple sentences.

I hope it helps.[/quote]
Hi sureshot,
Thanks for your comments. But I still believe that a phrase consists of one or more words. Maybe a gerund is a subphrase "a phrase making up part of a larger phrase".

David.
Topic: Final approaches (11)
Posted: Thursday, March 21, 2019 6:41:03 AM
Hi teachers,
I know that a gerund is a verb functioning as a noun, but is it a gerund a phrase as well? I believe so. I'm assuming that because a phrase consists of a word or group of words without a subject-verb combination.
Could you correct or confirm my assumption?
Examples:
Reading is relaxing.
Singing makes Carol happy.

Thanks.
Topic: Final approaches (10)
Posted: Saturday, March 16, 2019 1:05:21 PM
FounDit wrote:
It certainly fits my understanding of the term.

Thanks for your reply, FounDit. Angel

David.
Topic: Final approaches (10)
Posted: Saturday, March 16, 2019 2:44:05 AM
Hi teachers,
Peter hid her books under the bed.

In the sentence above "under the bed" is an adverbial prepositional phrase fo one reason:
1. Because it answers the question: Where did Peter hide her books? Right?


Thanks.
Topic: Final approaches (8)
Posted: Thursday, March 14, 2019 6:18:20 PM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hi!
Yes - that sounds good.
Definitely less disappointing than reading the book before watching the movie.
isn't it?

Thanks for your help, Drag0n.

David.
Topic: Final approaches (9)
Posted: Thursday, March 14, 2019 6:46:59 AM
The structure is PREPOSITION + object pro(noun).

Are the sentences natural and correct now?
a) I went to the cinema WITH them.
b) I went to the cinema WITH Mary and Don.
c) I bought snacks FOR them.
d) I bought snacks FOR Susan and Andy.

David.
Topic: Final approaches (9)
Posted: Thursday, March 14, 2019 5:59:53 AM
thar wrote:
A side point - your noun phrase would be 'both her and me', surely? I can understand you don't want to include distracting extras in your examples, but from a grammatical standpoint it is the same object - a noun phrase.
Comments disagreeing, anyone?

No comma - the 'both her and me' is a unit.
Got that.

Hmm... so "both her and me" is a noun phrase. That's true, I don't want to include distracting extras for the sake of the structure.

David.
Topic: Final approaches (9)
Posted: Thursday, March 14, 2019 4:52:47 AM
thar wrote:
[quote=DavidLearn]Hi teachers,
According to the structure, are the examples correct and natural?

Examples of prepositional phrases:

1. PREPOSITION + object pro(noun)
a) Peter gave a present TO her.

Very unusual. This would usually be
He gave her a present.
Only if you were really stressing it would you say that.
He gave the present to her, not to me. How could he!
The standard form would be the indirect object first, no preposition.

b) Peter gave a present TO Sheila.
Not quite as odd-sounding as 1, although still more likely to be 'he gave Sheila a present' unless there is further context to justify the longer form.
c) It's a big problem FOR her and me.

d) It's a big problem FOR Carol and me.

Nothing wrong, but feels a bit lacking. More natural either
Simple - us
Or, stressing the two people
both her/Sheila and me


Hi thar,
Then these are the ones:
a) He gave the present TO her, not TO me. How could he!
b) He gave the present TO Sheila, not TO me. How could he!

Even though "both" is a pronoun, it isn't an object pronoun. Have to look for another sentence.
c) It's a big problem FOR both, her and me.
d) It's a big problem FOR both, Carol and me.

thar wrote:
Sorry, don't mean to be niggling at everything you write, it just turns out that way! Nothing 'wrong' here, (and all fine in particular context, with particular stress) but in terms of natural, as a model sentence for eternal reference, in isolation - I am just saying what feels a bit less than natural to me.

No worries at all, honestly. I'm here to learn and to be corrected if that is the case. If that happens frequently is because I'm wrong.

David.
Topic: Final approaches (7)
Posted: Thursday, March 14, 2019 4:13:23 AM
thar wrote:
Yes, they seem OK. But 'the North of Europe' covers a wide area! It is not a single destination you would normally be said to drive to - Holland, Finland, Iceland? I suggest a minor change to make that more natural - the north of the city, or something like that.

Got that, thar.

David.

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